Psychology of dreams
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29-10-2015, 06:10 AM
Psychology of dreams
No, this thread is not about cigars really being penises.

It's about unresolved issues causing dreams. The extreme is wake dreams that seem real as in PTSD. The most common is recurring night mares.

When we have life experiences that either go counter to what our world view is, or where we are forced to act counter to our convictions, or that leave a big gap in our daily lives, we may quit thinking about it consciously during the day, but the brain never stops working on it. At night, when we are not busy working out present tense events, the brain goes back to the "unresolved files".

Often these dreams end up penetrating our consciousness, causing you to be aware of them. In PTSD they are so strong that they can over ride reality, most of the time they just happen while we are sort of watching.

Dreams that happen when you are half conscious can sometimes be managed. This doesn't work when they are just plain reruns of events ( like I dreamt about my husband's death every night for months after he died, just a complete rerun of everything that he did or said etc). In that case, the brain just takes another look at events.

Other times, the brain creates stories around the same theme to see how they will end. These are the dreams you can manage. Often you want to scream but can't, run but your legs don't work, and the like. If you resolve ahead of time that next time this happens, Super woman or your dad or dog or whatever will show up and speak for you or carry you away or shoot the trouble maker or whatever, you will snap to consciousness long enough to insert your hero. This often resolves that particular dream and it won't return. Sometimes it takes a couple of times.

Girly reminded me of this when he commented on it in another thread. It was told to me by a psychologist who was researching dreams. I tried it, and it worked. It didn't work on "reality re-runs" but it did on variations on themes.

Thought it might come in handy for some of you who have such issues, night mares can be nasty and it's worth a shot to try to get rid of them.

On the other end of the spectrum you have dreams where you can fly or bounce or take huge strides etc. These are pleasant and healthy dreams and it is good to consciously prolong them. They release euphoric chemicals and can influence the following day in a positive manner.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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29-10-2015, 06:16 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
I always just thought of dreams as my brain taking a vacation.....

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The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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29-10-2015, 06:53 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
(29-10-2015 06:16 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  I always just thought of dreams as my brain taking a vacation.....

Quite the opposite. Your body is taking the vacation.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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29-10-2015, 07:16 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
I saw in a documentary somewhere (a nova one I think) that they are speculating that nightmares are the body practicing how to respond in scary situations. Kids tend to have nightmares of monsters then as we get older it transitions to real life situations.

I don't know how accurate that is, but it was interesting.
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29-10-2015, 07:21 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
We don't really know all that much about dreams.

Probably there is a lot more to it than meets the eye. The brain tends to have reasons for why it does things.

I just wanted to share something practical that can help alleviate night mares. Would work for kids, too.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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29-10-2015, 07:37 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
I have all sorts of weird stuff passing through my head at night Some of it seems to have a point, some of it doesn't.

While I was studying Chinese, one strange thing I found was that people in my dreams would speak to me in Chinese, saying things I didn't think I understood, but if I woke up still remembering what they said and wrote it down, looked it up, and made an effort to decipher it, it would make sense. Given that those people were obviously coming out of my own mind, it stands to reason that I had some level of subliminal understanding that I couldn't quite bring to the surface while I was awake. I've heard a lot of other language enthusiasts say that one of the reasons sleep is important is because dreams serve as an opportunity for your mind to solidify memories it considers to be important. I've got no data to back up the concept, but it seems like a reasonable possibility to me.

I've never been plagued by nightmares despite some of the nasty experiences I've managed to seek out, but I've relived some bad memories from time to time nonetheless. Probably one of the most horrifying ones was based off a situation I encountered while attached to an anti drug raid about 15 years back in which we discovered a few young children (aged 2 to 6) in a basement who had been suffocated using plastic wrap. For years I thought I'd pushed it out of my mind, but recently, after having my own kids, a near duplicate of the experience revisited me in a dream, the only difference being that in the dream my own son was one of the kids. That had me in a pissed off mood for a couple days :/

Normally I just dream about stuff like zombies, which I kind of enjoy and end up being disappointed when I wake up and it's not real.

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29-10-2015, 08:03 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
(29-10-2015 07:37 AM)yakherder Wrote:  While I was studying Chinese, one strange thing I found was that people in my dreams would speak to me in Chinese, saying things I didn't think I understood, but if I woke up still remembering what they said and wrote it down, looked it up, and made an effort to decipher it, it would make sense. Given that those people were obviously coming out of my own mind, it stands to reason that I had some level of subliminal understanding that I couldn't quite bring to the surface while I was awake. I've heard a lot of other language enthusiasts say that one of the reasons sleep is important is because dreams serve as an opportunity for your mind to solidify memories it considers to be important. I've got no data to back up the concept, but it seems like a reasonable possibility to me.

That makes sense to me, having learned foreign languages, too. You pick up a lot of stuff peripherally and one does dream in the new language, probably integrating the peripheral stuff.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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29-10-2015, 08:05 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
I hate my flying dreams, for me those aren't fun at all. I only fly inside buildings for some reason and bump into and break stuff. I only rarely remember pleasant dreams. I have a lot of anxiety IRL and a lot of anxiety dreams. I also have a lot of narrated dreams and dreams where I am several characters, maybe because I write fiction and am often thinking about plot.

I've tried lucid dreaming techniques and not been able to make them work for me. Wish I could--the next time I have the dream where my father tries to knife me and everyone in the house to death, I would like to be able to change the outcome.
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29-10-2015, 08:06 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
One thing that bugs me about my dreams.... I'll dream I'm doing something -- and I'll light up a cigarette -- then feel guilty about smoking.

I haven't smoked in years.

Just once - I wish I'd just enjoy it, and get on with the rest of the dream...

Wink

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The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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29-10-2015, 08:08 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
(29-10-2015 08:05 AM)julep Wrote:  I hate my flying dreams, for me those aren't fun at all. I only fly inside buildings for some reason and bump into and break stuff. I only rarely remember pleasant dreams. I have a lot of anxiety IRL and a lot of anxiety dreams. I also have a lot of narrated dreams and dreams where I am several characters, maybe because I write fiction and am often thinking about plot.

I've tried lucid dreaming techniques and not been able to make them work for me. Wish I could--the next time I have the dream where my father tries to knife me and everyone in the house to death, I would like to be able to change the outcome.

Superman can blast out the walls and let you soar free... and he can turn your father into a bunny rabbit with a carrot.

Can you imagine it? That helps implant it, your brain can pull it up as reference during the dream and - voila.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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