Psychology of dreams
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29-10-2015, 08:14 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
(29-10-2015 08:08 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(29-10-2015 08:05 AM)julep Wrote:  I hate my flying dreams, for me those aren't fun at all. I only fly inside buildings for some reason and bump into and break stuff. I only rarely remember pleasant dreams. I have a lot of anxiety IRL and a lot of anxiety dreams. I also have a lot of narrated dreams and dreams where I am several characters, maybe because I write fiction and am often thinking about plot.

I've tried lucid dreaming techniques and not been able to make them work for me. Wish I could--the next time I have the dream where my father tries to knife me and everyone in the house to death, I would like to be able to change the outcome.

Superman can blast out the walls and let you soar free... and he can turn your father into a bunny rabbit with a carrot.

Can you imagine it? That helps implant it, your brain can pull it up as reference during the dream and - voila.

I'll try the carrot one. I'm getting close to a holiday visit with him which always makes the murder dreams multiply. I don't want to fly in my dreams at all, so maybe I will just imagine a pair of lead boots.
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29-10-2015, 08:41 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
I have had repeated dreams about real estate for YEARS: the locations and homes vary, but I'm always trying to buy or sell a very large house, which has something wrong with it, and I get lost in the house and can't seem to get out.
Sometimes the dream is about the house's location, sometimes about the layout,
Sometimes the house is in my local neighbourhood and I recognize the street names, other times it's in a strange neighbourhood or even a strange country.
Often my parents or children, and sometimes my pets (!) are in the dream with me!
These dreams seem quite rational: nothing really strange about them, but they often inspire impatience and frustration.

Just the other night, I had the same kind of dream, and this time my father (who died two years ago) was painting the walls of one room in a house I was thinking of buying. But at the same time, my husband and I were inspecting the room and seeing red mold growing along the support beams in the walls, which my father was trying to paint over in bright yellow. I kept telling my father, "no we can't buy this home, it has mold problems," but he just kept painting. Then I woke up.

I think I may have solved it: I have noticed that my dreams tend to be very literal, in that I will take a metaphor and play it out as if it were true (i.e. cat got your tongue will be dreamt of as a cat actually taking your tongue).
I think that the house(s) may be a literal interpretation of a bible verse: John 14:2
"My Father's house has many rooms ...; ?"

My father was a very pious man, who tended to whitewash the RCC's horrific misdeeds (painting over them?) while I and my husband could see the mold and we were "not buying it"!
Could all these "real estate" dreams be my subconscious trying to inspect and "buy into" or reject the values that my RCC brainwashing has imposed on me?
Stay tuned.

Your faith is not evidence, your opinion is not fact, and your bias is not wisdom
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29-10-2015, 09:32 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
Brain movies?

Don't let those gnomes and their illusions get you down. They're just gnomes and illusions.

--Jake the Dog, Adventure Time

Alouette, je te plumerai.
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29-10-2015, 09:32 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
I have a variety of different dreams. Sometimes I dream about my dad (he passed away several years ago). Those dreams can be quite vivid--I can see why religious people can sometimes think it is a sign or an actual loved one saying "hi" to them in their dreams. While I know it is my own brain producing these images, I still find the dreams of my dad very comforting.

I also have bizarre dreams. But I know where they come from. I have felt "trapped" by religion and society for awhile and now that I am an atheist, I am finally able to break free and live the life I want. The most bizarre of these dreams: I was living in a town that I couldn't get out of. You weren't allowed to go past a giant rock that was in the woods. If you did, the powers that be could cut off one of your fingers every time you tried to leave. I ended up leaving the town anyway with some faceless guy. We went past the giant rock and got caught and as punishment, we were going to have our fingers cut off. The faceless guy told them he he would have two fingers cut off instead of them doing anything to me. Then I woke up. Big Grin
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29-10-2015, 09:37 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
(29-10-2015 07:37 AM)yakherder Wrote:  I have all sorts of weird stuff passing through my head at night Some of it seems to have a point, some of it doesn't.

While I was studying Chinese, one strange thing I found was that people in my dreams would speak to me in Chinese, saying things I didn't think I understood, but if I woke up still remembering what they said and wrote it down, looked it up, and made an effort to decipher it, it would make sense. Given that those people were obviously coming out of my own mind, it stands to reason that I had some level of subliminal understanding that I couldn't quite bring to the surface while I was awake. I've heard a lot of other language enthusiasts say that one of the reasons sleep is important is because dreams serve as an opportunity for your mind to solidify memories it considers to be important. I've got no data to back up the concept, but it seems like a reasonable possibility to me.

I've never been plagued by nightmares despite some of the nasty experiences I've managed to seek out, but I've relived some bad memories from time to time nonetheless. Probably one of the most horrifying ones was based off a situation I encountered while attached to an anti drug raid about 15 years back in which we discovered a few young children (aged 2 to 6) in a basement who had been suffocated using plastic wrap. For years I thought I'd pushed it out of my mind, but recently, after having my own kids, a near duplicate of the experience revisited me in a dream, the only difference being that in the dream my own son was one of the kids. That had me in a pissed off mood for a couple days :/

Normally I just dream about stuff like zombies, which I kind of enjoy and end up being disappointed when I wake up and it's not real.

I can't imagine seeing something like that and not having nightmares about it. I just don't understand that level of evil. Or how people could possibly believe in a god who allows sick fucks to do something like that to children.
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29-10-2015, 10:00 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
(29-10-2015 08:05 AM)julep Wrote:  I hate my flying dreams, for me those aren't fun at all.

I had a flying dream just before I woke up this morning. It's only the second or third time I've ever flown in a dream. It was exhilarating; it was a beautiful spring day and I was walking down a slope in a meadow and the wind picked up a bit and I just lifted off and circled the meadow. I ended up setting down by a bunch of people who were just staring open-mouthed and I laughed and told them it was nothing they couldn't do if they wanted to and then the damn cat woke me up because it was past feeding time.

One thing I've noticed recently is that while I know people in my dreams they never look or sound like they do in real life. I'll be doing something with a really good friend and I wake up and realize that the dream image bore no resemblance to the real person. Thinking back, I don't remember ever having a dream where the person I knew it was in the dream ever matched the real person.

Atheism: it's not just for communists any more!
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29-10-2015, 11:15 AM
RE: Psychology of dreams
(29-10-2015 10:00 AM)unfogged Wrote:  
(29-10-2015 08:05 AM)julep Wrote:  I hate my flying dreams, for me those aren't fun at all.

I had a flying dream just before I woke up this morning. It's only the second or third time I've ever flown in a dream. It was exhilarating; it was a beautiful spring day and I was walking down a slope in a meadow and the wind picked up a bit and I just lifted off and circled the meadow. I ended up setting down by a bunch of people who were just staring open-mouthed and I laughed and told them it was nothing they couldn't do if they wanted to and then the damn cat woke me up because it was past feeding time.

One thing I've noticed recently is that while I know people in my dreams they never look or sound like they do in real life. I'll be doing something with a really good friend and I wake up and realize that the dream image bore no resemblance to the real person. Thinking back, I don't remember ever having a dream where the person I knew it was in the dream ever matched the real person.

I dream about people I know a lot. Sometimes I wake up in a panic because I've had huge dream fight with my husband where he says he wants a divorce. (When he dreams about me, he tells me, we are usually getting busy someplace like a conference room.)
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30-10-2015, 10:11 PM
RE: Psychology of dreams
Dreams are problem solvers and processing aids. Whether that is for mental problem solving or to simply feel good. A nightmare helps to 'face fear' and feel good dreams try to calm a person down. It's not perfect, but it's a mental helper.
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