Psychology of guns
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
26-10-2015, 03:14 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 02:29 PM)Reducetarian Wrote:  IMO, the real question here is: What are you (individual Americans) afraid of?
Now ask yourself: Why are you afraid of this?

Question 1. --- I'm not afraid. I carry a gun. I don't need to be afraid.
Question 2. -- see answer to question 1.

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes onlinebiker's post
26-10-2015, 03:52 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 02:41 PM)jennybee Wrote:  
(26-10-2015 02:29 PM)Reducetarian Wrote:  I don't think that your first point is true in places outside the USA. In places other than America, there's a big difference between being "pro-gun" and "pro-handgun-for-personal-protection"

There are many very competent, gun-safe hunters in Canada who are quite knowledgeable about weapons but don't think of their hunting rifles as a weapon for personal protection (except from bears). I think that such attitudes towards firearms are much more culturally specific than you may realize.

As a former Canadian army engineering officer and range safety officer, who has studied and fired weapons of pretty much every calibre, I would never consider carrying a firearm for personal protection in any area of any major metropolitan centre in Canada. So that would make me a gun-knowledgeable, "anti-handgun-for-"personal-protection" person. And I don't know of anyone who feels differently, among all my middle-aged army and hunter friends and acquaintances, be they politically liberal or conservative.

My son recently obtained his firearms license because his girlfriend and her family are avid hunters. He too would never consider obtaining a non-hunting-related firearm. And neither would his friends. Yet all are first-person-shooter video game players, Call-of-Duty fans, and paintball aficionados.

My father-in-law is the most bad-ass 70 year-old you ever met, goes deer and moose hunting yearly, regularly supplemented his family's diet with game meats, still hunts deer with a crossbow, subscribes to "chasse et pĂȘche" (a hunting and fishing magazine) and yet would never consider owning a handgun for self-protection, even though he lives in Montreal.

Now maybe that's because Canada has much stricter laws concerning firearms, and handguns in particular, but there is no significant movement to change this aspect of our culture. Rather, there is pressure to stop the illegal flow of handguns from the US.

At least in Canada, (and probably in Europe) there is A HUGE difference in attitude towards owning a firearm for hunting and owning a firearm for self-defence: the idea of owning a firearm for self-defence just doesn't enter into the equation for "ordinary" people in Canada and Europe, regardless of whether they live in urban or rural areas. (By "ordinary" I mean those not involved in gangs and/or organized crime).

IMO, the real question here is: What are you (individual Americans) afraid of?
Now ask yourself: Why are you afraid of this?

I'm afraid of getting raped or worse. I have had many scary situations happen. While I was in a grocery store parking lot, a man came up from behind me while I was getting a shopping cart, put his arm around me tightly and started hitting on me. I had another guy show up at my house and try to get in saying he was a repair man and would not leave. This was after I caught him peering through the holes in my fence at me and would have continued to do so if I had not asked him what the fuck he wanted. I have had situations where I have been stuck in really bad areas of the city and had a man follow me for several blocks at night. I have been hiking by myself in the woods and have come across a group of men and I just think to myself fuck, if something happened to me out here I'd be fucked without a gun or some way to protect myself. This is only a snapshot of some of the shit I have had to deal with. And unfortunately, I know many women who have had similar situations.

I've been in similar situations also. I've had a man try to throw me into traffic in broad daylight, had men follow me, had a man stick a gun in my back, been robbed by a pair of men twice, had a man grab my boob while I was walking in a park with a friend, also in broad daylight, had men change from friendliness to extreme, threatening hostility the minute you decline a date with them, run into more than my share of flashers, etc., etc., etc. Plus just the normal harassment and intimidation you get at the street level when you are a female walking by yourself. I understand that feeling of having to always be on your guard and being afraid of what might happen.

A gun isn't my personal choice for protection, and I support stricter gun control laws, but I totally get why women, especially, feel they need that kind of protection.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like julep's post
26-10-2015, 04:05 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 03:52 PM)julep Wrote:  
(26-10-2015 02:41 PM)jennybee Wrote:  I'm afraid of getting raped or worse. I have had many scary situations happen. While I was in a grocery store parking lot, a man came up from behind me while I was getting a shopping cart, put his arm around me tightly and started hitting on me. I had another guy show up at my house and try to get in saying he was a repair man and would not leave. This was after I caught him peering through the holes in my fence at me and would have continued to do so if I had not asked him what the fuck he wanted. I have had situations where I have been stuck in really bad areas of the city and had a man follow me for several blocks at night. I have been hiking by myself in the woods and have come across a group of men and I just think to myself fuck, if something happened to me out here I'd be fucked without a gun or some way to protect myself. This is only a snapshot of some of the shit I have had to deal with. And unfortunately, I know many women who have had similar situations.

I've been in similar situations also. I've had a man try to throw me into traffic in broad daylight, had men follow me, had a man stick a gun in my back, been robbed by a pair of men twice, had a man grab my boob while I was walking in a park with a friend, also in broad daylight, had men change from friendliness to extreme, threatening hostility the minute you decline a date with them, run into more than my share of flashers, etc., etc., etc. Plus just the normal harassment and intimidation you get at the street level when you are a female walking by yourself. I understand that feeling of having to always be on your guard and being afraid of what might happen.

A gun isn't my personal choice for protection, and I support stricter gun control laws, but I totally get why women, especially, feel they need that kind of protection.

I definitely support stricter gun control laws. I wish I could say I am surprised by your post, but I'm not. I am really sorry that those things happened to you. It can be very scary. I used to work at a sunglasses store back in college. The store was encased in glass. There was a guy, who clearly had some mental problems, who would stand outside the store, staring at me, touching himself through his pants. I had to call mall security every day to get rid of him. I have had men try and grab my boobs, ass, arm, put their hands on my inner thigh etc. All random asshole guys who I don't know or want to know. Like you said in your post, it doesn't take much for a situation to go from bad to worse. I wish I didn't live in a society where I felt like I needed a gun or self-defense classes to feel safe--but I do.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-10-2015, 04:55 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 02:29 PM)Reducetarian Wrote:  
(26-10-2015 01:01 PM)onlinebiker Wrote:  Yup... There is one difference though.. Those people that tend to be the most anti-gun are also the ones that have the least actual knowledge of firearms.

People that are pro-gun are generally very well versed in the safe use of firearms.

I don't think that your first point is true in places outside the USA. In places other than America, there's a big difference between being "pro-gun" and "pro-handgun-for-personal-protection"

There are many very competent, gun-safe hunters in Canada who are quite knowledgeable about weapons but don't think of their hunting rifles as a weapon for personal protection (except from bears). I think that such attitudes towards firearms are much more culturally specific than you may realize.

As a former Canadian army engineering officer and range safety officer, who has studied and fired weapons of pretty much every calibre, I would never consider carrying a firearm for personal protection in any area of any major metropolitan centre in Canada. So that would make me a gun-knowledgeable, "anti-handgun-for-"personal-protection" person. And I don't know of anyone who feels differently, among all my middle-aged army and hunter friends and acquaintances, be they politically liberal or conservative.

My son recently obtained his firearms license because his girlfriend and her family are avid hunters. He too would never consider obtaining a non-hunting-related firearm. And neither would his friends. Yet all are first-person-shooter video game players, Call-of-Duty fans, and paintball aficionados.

My father-in-law is the most bad-ass 70 year-old you ever met, goes deer and moose hunting yearly, regularly supplemented his family's diet with game meats, still hunts deer with a crossbow, subscribes to "chasse et pĂȘche" (a hunting and fishing magazine) and yet would never consider owning a handgun for self-protection, even though he lives in Montreal.

Now maybe that's because Canada has much stricter laws concerning firearms, and handguns in particular, but there is no significant movement to change this aspect of our culture. Rather, there is pressure to stop the illegal flow of handguns from the US.

At least in Canada, (and probably in Europe) there is A HUGE difference in attitude towards owning a firearm for hunting and owning a firearm for self-defence: the idea of owning a firearm for self-defence just doesn't enter into the equation for "ordinary" people in Canada and Europe, regardless of whether they live in urban or rural areas. (By "ordinary" I mean those not involved in gangs and/or organized crime).

IMO, the real question here is: What are you (individual Americans) afraid of?
Now ask yourself: Why are you afraid of this?

Same reason you don't disarm your military, there is no threat of a country invading Canada yet you have an army, armed and ready to go if there is. There are already many, many weapons and many criminals with weapons in the US. That is not changing anytime soon, so instead of leaving ourselfs defenseless, it's a peace of mind kind of thing to know you have an option for decent defense in a place where a lot of bad guys have guns.

Also not fair, Canadians are genetically nice people lol

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-10-2015, 05:09 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
I personnaly believe in non-lethal weapon like tasers, plastic bullet guns and good grasp of a martial art suited for your age, body type and sex to defend myself and it's the strategy I would recommand. Firearms are overkill and potentially dangerous in close encounters.

Freedom is servitude to justice and intellectual honesty.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes epronovost's post
26-10-2015, 05:20 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 05:09 PM)epronovost Wrote:  I personnaly believe in non-lethal weapon like tasers, plastic bullet guns and good grasp of a martial art suited for your age, body type and sex to defend myself and it's the strategy I would recommand. Firearms are overkill and potentially dangerous in close encounters.
Guns are SUPPOSED to be lethal................

That's rather the point.

"Non lethal" stuff is rather beige.... It's non-committal. Choose to defend yourself, or not. If you wish to be a pacifistic type, who is willing to let themselves be violated in the hopes that such action will lead to the world being a better place --- fine....

Me -- I'm gonna put some lead, where it'll do the most good...

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-10-2015, 05:21 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 05:09 PM)epronovost Wrote:  I personnaly believe in non-lethal weapon like tasers, plastic bullet guns and good grasp of a martial art suited for your age, body type and sex to defend myself and it's the strategy I would recommand. Firearms are overkill and potentially dangerous in close encounters.

It may make you feel better believing that, but it is not a survivable strategy for most people.

Sincerely,
An armed Canadian Drinking Beverage

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Chas's post
26-10-2015, 05:25 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 05:09 PM)epronovost Wrote:  I personnaly believe in non-lethal weapon like tasers, plastic bullet guns and good grasp of a martial art suited for your age, body type and sex to defend myself and it's the strategy I would recommand. Firearms are overkill and potentially dangerous in close encounters.

If they are even legal where you are, some states or places do not allow tasers. Martial Arts won't do any good against a gun from afar and guns that shoot rubber bullets are still firearms and rubber bullets are not very good for defending, they hurt but won't stop someone from shooting you, that's why they are mostly used for riot control and to break up protests.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-10-2015, 05:36 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 05:25 PM)JDog554 Wrote:  
(26-10-2015 05:09 PM)epronovost Wrote:  I personnaly believe in non-lethal weapon like tasers, plastic bullet guns and good grasp of a martial art suited for your age, body type and sex to defend myself and it's the strategy I would recommand. Firearms are overkill and potentially dangerous in close encounters.

If they are even legal where you are, some states or places do not allow tasers. Martial Arts won't do any good against a gun from afar and guns that shoot rubber bullets are still firearms and rubber bullets are not very good for defending, they hurt but won't stop someone from shooting you, that's why they are mostly used for riot control and to break up protests.

We can carry tasers here in Michigan -(you're in Holt, right??) - they changed the law a couple years ago....... I just don't find it a worthwhile effort.

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-10-2015, 05:38 PM
RE: Psychology of guns
(26-10-2015 05:36 PM)onlinebiker Wrote:  
(26-10-2015 05:25 PM)JDog554 Wrote:  If they are even legal where you are, some states or places do not allow tasers. Martial Arts won't do any good against a gun from afar and guns that shoot rubber bullets are still firearms and rubber bullets are not very good for defending, they hurt but won't stop someone from shooting you, that's why they are mostly used for riot control and to break up protests.

We can carry tasers here in Michigan -(you're in Holt, right??) - they changed the law a couple years ago....... I just don't find it a worthwhile effort.

I know we can do it here but I believe it is still illegal in a couple states. I think it was a good decision, nice to have the option.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: