Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
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31-01-2016, 12:33 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
Aliza is right. Putting the video on the internet so that the mentally disturbed masses can engage in a feeding frenzy was bad judgment. I am more interested in the psychology of the people who wish the young doctor harm. But, I know the psychology of the people who would do her harm because I have defended people who have done harm to others over some transgression that did not involve them personally. The shrinks usually diagnose them with any of several mental disorders within the general classification of "personality disorders." If you get a personality disorder diagnosis, it just means you are an asshole.
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31-01-2016, 12:37 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 12:33 PM)Black Eagle Wrote:  The shrinks usually diagnose them with any of several mental disorders within the general classification of "personality disorders." If you get a personality disorder diagnosis, it just means you are an asshole.
Unfortunately a diagnosis that includes "Personality disorder" is fairly common in my bloodline Weeping

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31-01-2016, 12:41 PM (This post was last modified: 31-01-2016 12:44 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 09:08 AM)Adrianime Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 07:30 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  She acted like an entitled, spoiled bitch. Whether charges were filed is irrelevant, (as are the threats ... bad as they are, they are a separate matter). She committed felony assault, destroyed his business records (or attempted to), and trespassed. If a man had done this to a woman, he would be locked up. She should be charged anyway. She publicly brought disrepute on her program and employer. She'll be terminated or suspended. "Leopards don't change their spots". No physician I know, would, in a million years act this way. She probably has a history of being an arrogant fuckwad. People don't just suddenly start acting this way, out of the blue. What's going on ? She's denying her behavior by "compartmentalizing" it and excusing it, saying "it's not me". Guess what bitch ? It IS you. Not to worry. She'll get a reality TV show offer, no doubt. If the driver had acted this way at her place of business, he would have been arrested. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compartmen...sychology)

I wouldn't put it past most people to act this way at some point in their lives. Behavior when you are intoxicated and emotionally damaged is not representative of the normal behavior of an individual. The people I know who know doctors tell me that doctors "party hard" because of how stressful their lives can be. It doesn't excuse her behavior, but her situation explains it to some extent. Demonizing her because of a single (and relatively harmless) incident is silly.

Also, what is the total damage towards this Uber driver that is worth raising a stink over? He was compensated (by her) and his business won't be affected. At best you could argue that he now might have a distrust of fear of passengers (which frankly, I would already have if I was him, which I why I will never be an Uber driver or get into an Uber).

And I disagree about the "if she were a man". I feel like she is being treated worse by the public because she is a female. If this were a guy I think the story would have blown over. As far as charges filed, it depends on the driver. I can't say whether or not he would have chosen to charge a male vs female.

You don't know that it's an isolated incident. Drunk people don't necessarily act that way. There's more to this ... than just this.
If a man had done this in a hospital, and assaulted a physician, he would have been arrested.

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31-01-2016, 12:47 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(30-01-2016 09:03 PM)Juice4Cheezits Wrote:  Hello, first post Smile

After seeing the video of the Miami physician who attacked the Uber driver, and then the follow up video where she apologized on national television, claimed she could not watch the entire video, claimed "When I look at the video, that's not me," etc ... I'm curious as to how you (whomever desires to respond to the thread) would break down what is going on psychologically with her response. Her shame, her inability to view her own behavior and accept it, her choice of phrases giving insight into her state of mind (i.e. "That's not me," and "I can't watch it," etc). I think one of the obvious things she is experiencing would be cognitive dissonance, for example. But what else ? For those who respond to the thread, I'd appreciate it if you would watch the video, and break it down from a psych point of view. Because she exhibits behavior that is quite common, in my opinion, concerning people who do not accept responsibility for their actions, who they are, thrive on cognitive dissonance, etc. So please feel free to give your take on the contrast between her actions with the driver, verses her position during her apology. Thanks !

Apology video, which shows some of the attack:




I don't see cognitive dissonance here. It's just a women acting out on her sense of entitlement , as society has taught her that she will suffer no consequences for her misbehavior being a women .
Outside of the hate she's receiving she would be correct, a man doing the same would end up with assault charges no doubt.

The "sincere" apology is just damage control.

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31-01-2016, 12:50 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 12:33 PM)Black Eagle Wrote:  Aliza is right. Putting the video on the internet so that the mentally disturbed masses can engage in a feeding frenzy was bad judgment. I am more interested in the psychology of the people who wish the young doctor harm. But, I know the psychology of the people who would do her harm because I have defended people who have done harm to others over some transgression that did not involve them personally. The shrinks usually diagnose them with any of several mental disorders within the general classification of "personality disorders." If you get a personality disorder diagnosis, it just means you are an asshole.
Thanks.
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31-01-2016, 01:04 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 12:47 PM)Slowminded Wrote:  
(30-01-2016 09:03 PM)Juice4Cheezits Wrote:  Hello, first post Smile

After seeing the video of the Miami physician who attacked the Uber driver, and then the follow up video where she apologized on national television, claimed she could not watch the entire video, claimed "When I look at the video, that's not me," etc ... I'm curious as to how you (whomever desires to respond to the thread) would break down what is going on psychologically with her response. Her shame, her inability to view her own behavior and accept it, her choice of phrases giving insight into her state of mind (i.e. "That's not me," and "I can't watch it," etc). I think one of the obvious things she is experiencing would be cognitive dissonance, for example. But what else ? For those who respond to the thread, I'd appreciate it if you would watch the video, and break it down from a psych point of view. Because she exhibits behavior that is quite common, in my opinion, concerning people who do not accept responsibility for their actions, who they are, thrive on cognitive dissonance, etc. So please feel free to give your take on the contrast between her actions with the driver, verses her position during her apology. Thanks !

Apology video, which shows some of the attack:




I don't see cognitive dissonance here. It's just a women acting out on her sense of entitlement , as society has taught her that she will suffer no consequences for her misbehavior being a women .
Outside of the hate she's receiving she would be correct, a man doing the same would end up with assault charges no doubt.

The "sincere" apology is just damage control.

I think she should have been arrested. Even though the Uber driver said that he wasn't going to press charges, the process of being handcuffed, hauled down to jail and left in a drunk tank all night would have been an appropriate first-offense response. Ultimately, this was a matter between two people who chose to settle it between themselves.

From what I can tell, the video's poster had no business in this matter at all.
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31-01-2016, 01:27 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
I'm not sure why some people seem to want to make this into a gender thing. If it was male, the situation would likely of been far more threatening.

Like this douche bag:



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31-01-2016, 01:43 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 01:27 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  I'm not sure why some people seem to want to make this into a gender thing. If it was male, the situation would likely of been far more threatening.

Facepalm
Yet you just did exactly that.

Intoxication has never been an acceptable defense.
The law applies to all, equally.
Rich or poor, professional or not, 100 pounds or 350 pounds.

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31-01-2016, 02:37 PM (This post was last modified: 31-01-2016 02:42 PM by coyote.)
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
The comments are against her because (my own opinion anyway) she's saying "that's not me".

That IS her. Clearly. It's right there on the video. She is, obviously, a person who would do exactly what she did. She is someone who believes she is 'above' that driver, and that therefore she is entitled to that behavior toward that driver. Odds are that had the vid never surfaced, she would never have felt a need to reach out to that driver. So not only does she feel she is somehow superior to a mere taxi driver, but she's also clearly lying to the world, and to herself, about it. You know, in order to preserve her profession and social position.

Interesting to watch her physical attractiveness work its magic on people.

BTW, it is interesting to compare her to folks who, when drunk or stoned, do what they later claim is "not who they are". It is my contention that the scenario is exactly opposite: alcohol and many other "social" drugs are de-inhibitors. They take away all the cover, and expose who you really are. The guy who beats his wife when he's drunk? The wife-beater is who he really is.
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31-01-2016, 02:43 PM (This post was last modified: 31-01-2016 03:02 PM by Juice4Cheezits.)
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 11:12 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 11:00 AM)Juice4Cheezits Wrote:  I just found her own response in her apology, to be almost textbook "something". And I'm curious what it is. Personally, I don't demonize her. Nor am I all that interested in her behavior towards the Uber driver. I'm more interested in the psychology behind her own response in her apology to her actions, and the contrast. But I'm sure I'll lose interest within the next 24 hours anyways, so lol.

Have you ever been drunk and done something you were totally embarrassment or ashamed of doing the next day? Her psychology seems to be exactly what you would expect from any remorseful person who did something like that while they were intoxicated, on a bad day.
Well, not everyone responds the same and displays the same behavior after doing something stupid while drunk they later regret. Some are remorseful for the harm they caused others, some are remorseful for what it says about their own behavior and could care less about the other person or consequences, etc. IMO there is self centered "guilt" (which is almost redundant, personally) and then there is guilt revolving around restitution, making something right, etc. Someone who feels shame because they were caught, verses someone who feels shame without the need to be caught, are two different things, etc and so forth.

As I said, I'm more interested in her response during her apology, than her drunken behavior. It's a very raw form of something I can't put my hand on. Remorse and guilt seem to be present, but her inability to face her own actions in video (i.e. "That's not me" or whatever she said") as well as her continued focus on the threats and such she received afterwards, as well as going on live TV, it just seems a bit fishy. Histrionic perhaps.

(31-01-2016 11:58 AM)Aliza Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 11:00 AM)Juice4Cheezits Wrote:  Personally, I'm not surprised by the commenters who demonize her, wish her ill will, etc. Mob mentality is nothing new, and it's much easier to participate in when one can do it from a distance (i.e. online attacks, leaving things on her car, calls, etc). To me, it's very similar to the depersonalization of using a gun: attempting to kill/harm/defend against someone with your bare hands, verses aiming a gun at them from a safe distance, are two wildly different things. One puts you at risk, the other you can do from a distance. A fast projectile does the dirty work, not your bare hands, so there is something depersonalized about it. Similar to online attacks and anonymous notes left on her car, etc. Such people would probably not say things to her face and risk physical confrontation, it's easier to do it from a distance. So that mob mentality doesn't surprise me. Animals gang up on one another, prey upon weaknesses, etc.

I just found her own response in her apology, to be almost textbook "something". And I'm curious what it is. Personally, I don't demonize her. Nor am I all that interested in her behavior towards the Uber driver. I'm more interested in the psychology behind her own response in her apology to her actions, and the contrast. But I'm sure I'll lose interest within the next 24 hours anyways, so lol.

The mob mentality is far worse than a drunk woman behaving inappropriately. We're not animals and behaving as such does no favors to our advancement as a species. This isn't expected behavior and it should not be tolerated or excused.

The poster of this video was wrong to put it on the internet. This may have been a public incident, and the law may be on the poster's side, but just because it's not illegal doesn't mean that it's not an expression poor, callous, and heartless judgment. This action has caused a disproportionate amount of backlash for this otherwise highly intelligent and talented woman and it will haunt her for the rest of her life. Why? For shits and giggles? Because someone decided on a whim that she deserved public humiliation?

Let's leave crime and punishment to the police and court system.
Actually, I would probably argue that human beings are animals. Predators at that. Mammals, etc. I didn't say we lack morality or ethics, but I would leave any discussions in that direction to a philosophy section or thread.

(31-01-2016 12:33 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  She got drunk and lost her shit over some silly shit. Shit happens.





(31-01-2016 12:33 PM)Black Eagle Wrote:  Aliza is right. Putting the video on the internet so that the mentally disturbed masses can engage in a feeding frenzy was bad judgment. I am more interested in the psychology of the people who wish the young doctor harm. But, I know the psychology of the people who would do her harm because I have defended people who have done harm to others over some transgression that did not involve them personally. The shrinks usually diagnose them with any of several mental disorders within the general classification of "personality disorders." If you get a personality disorder diagnosis, it just means you are an asshole.
I would say lots of projection is involved by those who would do her harm, amongst other things.

(31-01-2016 12:47 PM)Slowminded Wrote:  
(30-01-2016 09:03 PM)Juice4Cheezits Wrote:  Hello, first post Smile

After seeing the video of the Miami physician who attacked the Uber driver, and then the follow up video where she apologized on national television, claimed she could not watch the entire video, claimed "When I look at the video, that's not me," etc ... I'm curious as to how you (whomever desires to respond to the thread) would break down what is going on psychologically with her response. Her shame, her inability to view her own behavior and accept it, her choice of phrases giving insight into her state of mind (i.e. "That's not me," and "I can't watch it," etc). I think one of the obvious things she is experiencing would be cognitive dissonance, for example. But what else ? For those who respond to the thread, I'd appreciate it if you would watch the video, and break it down from a psych point of view. Because she exhibits behavior that is quite common, in my opinion, concerning people who do not accept responsibility for their actions, who they are, thrive on cognitive dissonance, etc. So please feel free to give your take on the contrast between her actions with the driver, verses her position during her apology. Thanks !

Apology video, which shows some of the attack:




I don't see cognitive dissonance here. It's just a women acting out on her sense of entitlement , as society has taught her that she will suffer no consequences for her misbehavior being a women .
Outside of the hate she's receiving she would be correct, a man doing the same would end up with assault charges no doubt.

The "sincere" apology is just damage control.
I would say her initial reaction to the video, is cognitive dissonance. She can't even stand to watch herself, and she is verbalizing, "That's not me". She cannot rationalize who she is seeing on the screen, with herself, to the degree she is telling herself, "It's not me," when it obviously is her. That to me, is at the very least, cognitive dissonance being displayed. There is a side to her, brought out by the dumping by the bf and the issue with her father and subsequent turn to alcohol, that she doesn't want to acknowledge is there, and can't look at.

What's it called when there are sides to yourself you don't want to acknowledge are there, even when you are looking directly at yourself on video being that person you don't want to acknowledge ? IOW, what's it called when you deny something with evidence to the contrary, and it involves your own self image ?

(31-01-2016 01:04 PM)Aliza Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 12:47 PM)Slowminded Wrote:  I don't see cognitive dissonance here. It's just a women acting out on her sense of entitlement , as society has taught her that she will suffer no consequences for her misbehavior being a women .
Outside of the hate she's receiving she would be correct, a man doing the same would end up with assault charges no doubt.

The "sincere" apology is just damage control.

I think she should have been arrested. Even though the Uber driver said that he wasn't going to press charges, the process of being handcuffed, hauled down to jail and left in a drunk tank all night would have been an appropriate first-offense response. Ultimately, this was a matter between two people who chose to settle it between themselves.

From what I can tell, the video's poster had no business in this matter at all.
FWIW, I believe she ordered an Uber car, to take her home. The Uber driver she is attacking, is not the one she ordered, he was there coincidentally. This is what set her off ... she is convinced he is the driver, and he is refusing to serve her. He's trying to tell her he's not her driver, the customer he's trying to drive is the one who ends up filming the incident. So the person filming the incident, is the original customer of this driver, whom this woman got in the way off, thinking this Uber driver was hers, when he wasn't. He was in the wrong place at the wrong time, and she didn't believe him, and apparently she forced his customer out of the car, or wouldn't let him get in, or something to that effect. Thus, when she went off, the original customer started to film it. So I believe his business in the matter, was that she was getting in the way of him and his Uber driver, so he was directly involved, if I understand the story correctly.
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