Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
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31-01-2016, 03:02 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 02:37 PM)coyote Wrote:  
The comments are against her because (my own opinion anyway) she's saying "that's not me".

That IS her. Clearly. It's right there on the video. She is, obviously, a person who would do exactly what she did. She is someone who believes she is 'above' that driver, and that therefore she is entitled to that behavior toward that driver. Odds are that had the vid never surfaced, she would never have felt a need to reach out to that driver. So not only does she feel she is somehow superior to a mere taxi driver, but she's also clearly lying to the world, and to herself, about it. You know, in order to preserve her profession and social position.

Interesting to watch her physical attractiveness work its magic on people.

BTW, it is interesting to compare her to folks who, when drunk or stoned, do what they later claim is "not who they are". It is my contention that the scenario is exactly opposite: alcohol and many other "social" drugs are de-inhibitors. They take away all the cover, and expose who you really are. The guy who beats his wife when he's drunk? The wife-beater is who he really is.

It's funny how some people have made it about her looks, or even the fact that she's a woman. No ones condoning how she acted, which was deplorable, but she fucked up, she apologized, no one was hurt, her and the driver reconciled. She's young, she was drunk, and stupid, but that doesn't mean her future needs to be ruined as a result of it.

I'm not sure why some folks on the internet, like some vindictive mob wish to have her head chopped off. I mean really, she ain't your scapegoat.

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
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31-01-2016, 03:22 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
My assessment: I expect that she sees herself as caring and empathetic due to the profession she has chosen and has never watched video of herself interacting rudely with others. It's shocking to most people to see themselves on film, that image is suddenly an "other" because you aren't inside it, so it's no wonder that she keeps protesting that she is not that person. Not so much cognitive dissonance regarding the behavior as expressing the separation of you the watcher from you the image.

Also, she's a doctor, and doctors are often treated like prima donnas. They do some tough, delicate work and use up a lot of energy to do that, so they are often allowed by the people around them to be brusque or rude, and this kind of entitled behavior can not only be learned, it is contagious. She also may have given herself a pass for being short with people around her because she thinks her stress is worse than their stress (a failing that she has in common with most humans).

I'm glad she apologized and hope she learns from it.

I wonder sometimes what all the images and scripts about life on video/reality shows, etc., do to ordinary people's heads, especially when they are stressed. This is just the kind of behavior that a Real-Housewife-of-Wherever or Kardashian would be urged to display for drama and a paycheck.
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31-01-2016, 03:24 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
Ok, here is my arm-chair psychoanalysis...

The term you may be looking for is dissociation. Dissociation is a coping mechanism experienced during traumatic events where one's personal identity or personal memories of a place or environment are dissociated with the event itself. There is also a Dissociative Identity Disorder which, by clinical definition, is not physiologically induced (by drugs or alcohol) and is not a one-time event.

The young lady is likely experiencing some sort of identity dissociation as a result of the stress of the situation caused by her drunken behavior, not the event itself. That feeling is further reinforced by her seeing a video of herself extremely intoxicated which I personally know to be a somewhat disconcerting experience.

I just wanted to let you know that I love you even though you aren't naked right now. Heart
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31-01-2016, 03:24 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 02:43 PM)Juice4Cheezits Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 01:04 PM)Aliza Wrote:  I think she should have been arrested. Even though the Uber driver said that he wasn't going to press charges, the process of being handcuffed, hauled down to jail and left in a drunk tank all night would have been an appropriate first-offense response. Ultimately, this was a matter between two people who chose to settle it between themselves.

From what I can tell, the video's poster had no business in this matter at all.
FWIW, I believe she ordered an Uber car, to take her home. The Uber driver she is attacking, is not the one she ordered, he was there coincidentally. This is what set her off ... she is convinced he is the driver, and he is refusing to serve her. He's trying to tell her he's not her driver, the customer he's trying to drive is the one who ends up filming the incident. So the person filming the incident, is the original customer of this driver, whom this woman got in the way off, thinking this Uber driver was hers, when he wasn't. He was in the wrong place at the wrong time, and she didn't believe him, and apparently she forced his customer out of the car, or wouldn't let him get in, or something to that effect. Thus, when she went off, the original customer started to film it. So I believe his business in the matter, was that she was getting in the way of him and his Uber driver, so he was directly involved, if I understand the story correctly.

So her world-wide public humiliation, ruined reputation and potential loss of her job is a suitable punishment for this guy who didn't get the cab he wanted?

This is not like a garment she can just remove when she's tired of it. She'll wear this shame for the rest of her life.
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31-01-2016, 03:32 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 03:24 PM)Aliza Wrote:  So her world-wide public humiliation, ruined reputation and potential loss of her job is a suitable punishment for this guy who didn't get the cab he wanted?

This is not like a garment she can just remove when she's tired of it. She'll wear this shame for the rest of her life

Apparently some people on the internet won't find catharsis until her head is under a guillotine.

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
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31-01-2016, 03:34 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 03:22 PM)julep Wrote:  My assessment: I expect that she sees herself as caring and empathetic due to the profession she has chosen and has never watched video of herself interacting rudely with others. It's shocking to most people to see themselves on film, that image is suddenly an "other" because you aren't inside it, so it's no wonder that she keeps protesting that she is not that person. Not so much cognitive dissonance regarding the behavior as expressing the separation of you the watcher from you the image.

Also, she's a doctor, and doctors are often treated like prima donnas. They do some tough, delicate work and use up a lot of energy to do that, so they are often allowed by the people around them to be brusque or rude, and this kind of entitled behavior can not only be learned, it is contagious. She also may have given herself a pass for being short with people around her because she thinks her stress is worse than their stress (a failing that she has in common with most humans).

I'm glad she apologized and hope she learns from it.
Interesting points, thanks Smile

Quote:I wonder sometimes what all the images and scripts about life on video/reality shows, etc., do to ordinary people's heads, especially when they are stressed. This is just the kind of behavior that a Real-Housewife-of-Wherever or Kardashian would be urged to display for drama and a paycheck.
I wonder at that too. I think constantly seeing scripted "reality" around us, leaves an imprint on people, who already have an interesting and unique relationship with personal identity. Personal identity is arguably a pursuit that takes decades for some, and a lifetime for others. Scripted existence may feed into a person's notions about identity, and create caricatures they become in their minds, even unbeknownst to them, so that in certain circumstances, those scripted roles come out, and they may find themselves "playing a role", and not even meaning too. And part of the continuous media stream as a source of input, probably plays a role in that forming and shaping of "identity".

(31-01-2016 03:24 PM)TurkeyBurner Wrote:  Ok, here is my arm-chair psychoanalysis...

The term you may be looking for is dissociation. Dissociation is a coping mechanism experienced during traumatic events where one's personal identity or personal memories of a place or environment are dissociated with the event itself. There is also a Dissociative Identity Disorder which, by clinical definition, is not physiologically induced (by drugs or alcohol) and is not a one-time event.

The young lady is likely experiencing some sort of identity dissociation as a result of the stress of the situation caused by her drunken behavior, not the event itself. That feeling is further reinforced by her seeing a video of herself extremely intoxicated which I personally know to be a somewhat disconcerting experience.
Good points as well, thanks. I was thinking of using the term dissociation, but wasn't sure if it would be too strong of a term to use in this case. I was also wondering if she was cycling through stages of grief as well, and once out of them, looking back at her going through some of the previous stages (anger, etc) she may not even be able to relate to that version of herself, because she went through it quickly.

(31-01-2016 03:24 PM)Aliza Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 02:43 PM)Juice4Cheezits Wrote:  FWIW, I believe she ordered an Uber car, to take her home. The Uber driver she is attacking, is not the one she ordered, he was there coincidentally. This is what set her off ... she is convinced he is the driver, and he is refusing to serve her. He's trying to tell her he's not her driver, the customer he's trying to drive is the one who ends up filming the incident. So the person filming the incident, is the original customer of this driver, whom this woman got in the way off, thinking this Uber driver was hers, when he wasn't. He was in the wrong place at the wrong time, and she didn't believe him, and apparently she forced his customer out of the car, or wouldn't let him get in, or something to that effect. Thus, when she went off, the original customer started to film it. So I believe his business in the matter, was that she was getting in the way of him and his Uber driver, so he was directly involved, if I understand the story correctly.

So her world-wide public humiliation, ruined reputation and potential loss of her job is a suitable punishment for this guy who didn't get the cab he wanted?
Perhaps you are confusing me with another poster ? I never stated anything along these lines.
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31-01-2016, 03:38 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 03:02 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 02:37 PM)coyote Wrote:  
The comments are against her because (my own opinion anyway) she's saying "that's not me".

That IS her. Clearly. It's right there on the video. She is, obviously, a person who would do exactly what she did. She is someone who believes she is 'above' that driver, and that therefore she is entitled to that behavior toward that driver. Odds are that had the vid never surfaced, she would never have felt a need to reach out to that driver. So not only does she feel she is somehow superior to a mere taxi driver, but she's also clearly lying to the world, and to herself, about it. You know, in order to preserve her profession and social position.

Interesting to watch her physical attractiveness work its magic on people.

BTW, it is interesting to compare her to folks who, when drunk or stoned, do what they later claim is "not who they are". It is my contention that the scenario is exactly opposite: alcohol and many other "social" drugs are de-inhibitors. They take away all the cover, and expose who you really are. The guy who beats his wife when he's drunk? The wife-beater is who he really is.

It's funny how some people have made it about her looks, or even the fact that she's a woman. No ones condoning how she acted, which was deplorable, but she fucked up, she apologized, no one was hurt, her and the driver reconciled. She's young, she was drunk, and stupid, but that doesn't mean her future needs to be ruined as a result of it.

I'm not sure why some folks on the internet, like some vindictive mob wish to have her head chopped off. I mean really, she ain't your scapegoat.

I'm not interested in her future either way. I'm only observing... and part of what I'm observing is a young attractive female being let off the hook compared to other folks. Jails are full of folks who, lacking such 'charms', couldn't catch a break early in their lives.

And the 'de-inhibitor' statement is also based on decades of observation. What we do when drunk is who we actually are. How mean we are to people, how abusive, etc... that all is exactly who we are. It is the desire to reconnect with who we are that often leads to addiction.
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31-01-2016, 03:49 PM (This post was last modified: 31-01-2016 03:53 PM by Tomasia.)
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 03:38 PM)coyote Wrote:  I'm not interested in her future either way. I'm only observing... and part of what I'm observing is a young attractive female being let off the hook compared to other folks. Jails are full of folks who, lacking such 'charms', couldn't catch a break early in their lives.

She was let off the hook because the victim didn't want to press charges.

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
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31-01-2016, 03:55 PM
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 03:49 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 03:38 PM)coyote Wrote:  I'm not interested in her future either way. I'm only observing... and part of what I'm observing is a young attractive female being let off the hook compared to other folks. Jails are full of folks who, lacking such 'charms', couldn't catch a break early in their lives.

She was let off the hook because the victim didn't want to press charges.

As a general statement (meaning referencing more than just this instance), how insane is that? If there is evidence a crime was committed, justice ought not hinge on whether the victim(s) wish to press charges.
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31-01-2016, 04:02 PM (This post was last modified: 31-01-2016 04:05 PM by Tomasia.)
RE: Psychology of the Miami Uber "Attacker"
(31-01-2016 03:55 PM)coyote Wrote:  
(31-01-2016 03:49 PM)Tomasia Wrote:  She was let off the hook because the victim didn't want to press charges.

As a general statement (meaning referencing more than just this instance), how insane is that? If there is evidence a crime was committed, justice ought not hinge on whether the victim(s) wish to press charges.

In situation like this it is. I know from personal experience.

One of my wife's fuck up of younger cousin, had a video of him posted on Facebook getting violently assualted by another guy. Me and my wife we're able to identify the guy who attacked him. We called the cops, they took a report. I was even able to show them the video. But they told us they couldn't do anything unless my cousin was willing to press charges.

"Tell me, muse, of the storyteller who has been thrust to the edge of the world, both an infant and an ancient, and through him reveal everyman." ---Homer the aged poet.

"In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it."
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