Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
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05-09-2013, 02:27 PM
Question Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
Theory of special relativity - if one twin moves at the speed of light, and then stops. He would have aged less than his twin who stayed behind.

Say you vibrated, 1 millimetre left and right at the speed of light, this counts as moving at or near the speed of light, yes?

If yes, does that mean the world around you will appear to have been sped up? That the moon and earth will flash across the sky every second or so (according to your watch), people and objects zooming past you in a blur?
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05-09-2013, 02:36 PM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
(05-09-2013 02:27 PM)PoolBoyG Wrote:  Theory of special relativity - if one twin moves at the speed of light, and then stops. He would have aged less than his twin who stayed behind.

Say you vibrated, 1 millimetre left and right at the speed of light, this counts as moving at or near the speed of light, yes?

If yes, does that mean the world around you will appear to have been sped up? That the moon and earth will flash across the sky every second or so (according to your watch), people and objects zooming past you in a blur?

The opposite actually. Everything around you would appear to slow down and then pretty much stop as you neared the speed of light. At light speed you would be unable to see of course since vision requires photons to enter your retinas.

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05-09-2013, 02:56 PM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
(05-09-2013 02:27 PM)PoolBoyG Wrote:  Theory of special relativity - if one twin moves at the speed of light, and then stops.

Well.

Stopping requires acceleration. Acceleration requires general relativity. The parameters of the question are insufficient...

So far as useful responses go, this may be of interest.

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05-09-2013, 02:59 PM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
Q on the Ultimate Vibrator

Yeah, totally not what I thought it was going to be. Pardon, Ferdi's head's in the gutter. Good thing, if it would've been that, I probably would have cried for clicking on this thread.
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05-09-2013, 03:49 PM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
Ultimate vibrator Thumbsup

I don't really like going outside.
It's too damn "peopley" out there....
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05-09-2013, 04:09 PM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
Yeah, the title was meant to be provocative to get more responses. I just want this answered.

So you need a continuous motion for this scenario to work? Okay, you're swaying in a circular motion at the speed of or near the speed of light.
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05-09-2013, 11:50 PM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
I think perhaps you (or twin A) will have aged differently, however the 'world' (people, objects, etc) will be (and appear) present time. During the process (as fast as light), then yes objects etc will be a blur, as in a motion blur).

Are you on drugs? lol.
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06-09-2013, 12:48 AM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
Well, assuming

1) there is a machine which can generate an infinite force to drive your body in a harmonic oscillation with peak speeds at c (this would be needed as your mass increases when you are accelerated and approaches infinity as you approach c).

And

2) you can survive that kind acceleration well exceeding 1000 Gs.

You probably couldn't detect anything but a blur as it would be beyond the capabilities of your eyes to sense anything distinguishable.

I also would speculate that, in that situation, you would spend so little time at or near c, that the effects of perceptible time dialation would be negligible. Also while you are vibrating at c, you're not actually translating through the space time continuum at c, so there might not be any observable changes between your frame of reference and an outside observer (similar to a cork bobbing in the waves).

Just some thoughts. I'll dig out my old physics textbooks on this someitmand investigate this further.

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06-09-2013, 03:08 PM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
(05-09-2013 04:09 PM)PoolBoyG Wrote:  Yeah, the title was meant to be provocative to get more responses. I just want this answered.

So you need a continuous motion for this scenario to work? Okay, you're swaying in a circular motion at the speed of or near the speed of light.

Well, its way easier to give an answer with circular motion because the acceleration is constant also there is a term that becomes zero the acceleration is perpendicular to the velocity.

It's a bit late here, but I can tell you this: The guy moving in circular motion will experience the acceleration towards the center of the circle as stronger than what it looks like from the perspective of someone standing still compared to the center of the circle.

Imagine we've drawn the circle the guy moves around, now for the acceleration to feel stronger for the "circle guy" his time has to move slower.

I'm a bit tired so I'm not fully trusting my non-mathematical explanation (might come an upgrade tomorrow). Can't really say why the acceleration is stronger except the math tells me so.

Acceleration of the guy moving in circles: a_0 = a/(1-(v/c)^2)
where a is the acceleration seen for the outside observer and v is the speed measured by him. a_0 is the acceleration felt by "circle guy".

Basically when you know how to get this equation, seeing for whom time goes slower is quite straight forward.
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07-09-2013, 11:52 PM
RE: Q on the Ultimate Vibrator and special relativity
(05-09-2013 02:27 PM)PoolBoyG Wrote:  Theory of special relativity - if one twin moves at the speed of light, and then stops. He would have aged less than his twin who stayed behind.

Say you vibrated, 1 millimetre left and right at the speed of light, this counts as moving at or near the speed of light, yes?

If yes, does that mean the world around you will appear to have been sped up? That the moon and earth will flash across the sky every second or so (according to your watch), people and objects zooming past you in a blur?

You kind of allude to it, but this is the classic "Twin Paradox" problem. The turnarounds/accelerations are non-inertial frames of reference which special relativity doesn't really address (hence why there isn't a paradox where both twins see the other traveling faster and therefore aging slower). The wiki goes into a couple ways to figure the effect of the turnaround, but general relativity handles the accelerating frames of reference:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twin_paradox

I think that the world would speed up around you, but we'd have to stay at a macroscopic scale--we can't reconcile general relativity withe quantum mechanics
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