Q. re. psychology of belief
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
02-07-2011, 09:40 AM
 
Q. re. psychology of belief
What is the psychological tendency to read meaning into stuff (stars, palms, tea leaves) called? I know it's superstition, but is there a technical name for this practice? Thanks.
Quote this message in a reply
02-07-2011, 12:53 PM
RE: Q. re. psychology of belief
(02-07-2011 09:40 AM)icouldbewrong Wrote:  What is the psychological tendency to read meaning into stuff (stars, palms, tea leaves) called? I know it's superstition, but is there a technical name for this practice? Thanks.

Tasseography, for tea leaves any way. Palmistry for palm reading. Astrology is of coarse, the belief in stars influence on our lives.

Pseudoscience (fake science) seems to pretty well cover all of them. I don't find a particular psychological name for the condition of the mind that believes these things.

Perhaps a belief in Parapsychology is what your searching for.

Oh, and by the way, welcome to the forum!

Oxymoron: "Religious teaching"
"Simple common sense goes out the window when religion comes in through the door." Me (Blasphemy Fan )
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
03-07-2011, 08:32 AM
RE: Q. re. psychology of belief
Micheal Shermer calls it patternicity, though he's more discussing the biological tendency for it.

I'm not a non believer, I believe in the possibility of anything. I just don't let the actuality of something be determined by a 3rd party.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-07-2011, 12:42 AM
 
RE: Q. re. psychology of belief
Thanks! Patternicity is brilliant (as is Shermer). There's some sort of logical fallacy or cognitive distortion behind patternicity and i'm trying to nail down the technical name if such exists.

And thanks for the welcome. Happy to be here.
Quote this message in a reply
06-07-2011, 12:47 PM
RE: Q. re. psychology of belief
(06-07-2011 12:42 AM)icouldbewrong Wrote:  Thanks! Patternicity is brilliant (as is Shermer). There's some sort of logical fallacy or cognitive distortion behind patternicity and i'm trying to nail down the technical name if such exists.

And thanks for the welcome. Happy to be here.

I'm not sure if "patternicity" is the official name or not, but it's long-established fact that human brains are wired to look for meaning and patterns even when such things don't really exist. The ability to spot false patterns and meanings is called pareidolia, and it's responsible for a lot of things, including the "backmasking" scare when rock and roll was first starting out and the ability to see faces in the clouds.

It's an evolutionary tendency. Failing to see a pattern - such as tiger paw prints being associated with the presence of tigers - when one is present often leads to death, whereas seeing patterns everywhere, including where none exist, is an evolutionary advantage. It lets you avoid the tigers. You might also be avoiding some things that don't exist, but the damage done by this is minimal.

"Owl," said Rabbit shortly, "you and I have brains. The others have fluff. If there is any thinking to be done in this Forest - and when I say thinking I mean thinking - you and I must do it."
- A. A. Milne, The House at Pooh Corner
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-07-2011, 11:15 AM (This post was last modified: 08-07-2011 11:18 AM by TrainWreck.)
RE: Q. re. psychology of belief
(06-07-2011 12:42 AM)icouldbewrong Wrote:  Thanks! Patternicity is brilliant (as is Shermer). There's some sort of logical fallacy or cognitive distortion behind patternicity and i'm trying to nail down the technical name if such exists.

Why isn't "belief," or "false belief," acceptable as the technical term?

I'm not familiar with Shermer's use of "patternicity," but that would seem to be a term that could be used in the discovery of "information" that leads to factual information, as well.
(06-07-2011 12:47 PM)Unbeliever Wrote:  The ability to spot false patterns and meanings is called pareidolia, and it's responsible for a lot of things, including the "backmasking" scare when rock and roll was first starting out and the ability to see faces in the clouds.
Yes, this would seem to be the correct term.

Humanism - ontological doctrine that posits that humans define reality
Theism - ontological doctrine that posits a supernatural entity creates and defines reality
Atheism - political doctrine opposed to theist doctrine in public policy
I am right, and you are wrong - I hope you die peacefullyCool
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
09-07-2011, 12:16 AM
 
RE: Q. re. psychology of belief
Aha, I think this is it: pareidolia! Wiki's got a nice (but too short) article on it, complete with funny photos. Thanks again!
Quote this message in a reply
02-08-2011, 07:41 PM
RE: Q. re. psychology of belief
Pareidolia is it, I believe also.
Just had an interesting argument with a friend of mine about whether Homo Sapiens are primarily the Tool Makers, (his view), or the Pattern Seekers, (mine).
I think the tools are made as fall out, (side effect) of the attempts at pattern recognition. I also think the psychological NEED to fit observations of one's environment into patterns, (systems), whether concocted, (religion), or the result of genuine science, is why we have religion today. We get uneasy without reference points for the observations. (??) The pattern seeking seems to come first .

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein
Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: