Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
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05-02-2013, 09:31 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
People don't seem to understand what random means in science. The science and mathematics of stochasticity (the study of randomness) is well established. There are patterns in randomness. For instance, if you flip a coin 100 times, the odds of there being seven "heads" in a row is one in three. You get a sort of meta-probability that can be used to analyze more complex probabilities.

Quantum Mechanics is based on stochastic randomness, that is it is truly random, truly probability based. If there is a structure underlying it then it must also be the structure underlying randomness itself.

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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05-02-2013, 09:37 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 09:31 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  People don't seem to understand what random means in science. The science and mathematics of stochasticity (the study of randomness) is well established. There are patterns in randomness. For instance, if you flip a coin 100 times, the odds of there being seven "heads" in a row is one in three. You get a sort of meta-probability that can be used to analyze more complex probabilities.

Quantum Mechanics is based on stochastic randomness, that is it is truly random, truly probability based. If there is a structure underlying it then it must also be the structure underlying randomness itself.

[Image: nnano.2012.34-f3.jpg]

The results of sending a ton of these substances through the double slit.

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05-02-2013, 09:43 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 09:37 PM)fstratzero Wrote:  
(05-02-2013 09:31 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  People don't seem to understand what random means in science. The science and mathematics of stochasticity (the study of randomness) is well established. There are patterns in randomness. For instance, if you flip a coin 100 times, the odds of there being seven "heads" in a row is one in three. You get a sort of meta-probability that can be used to analyze more complex probabilities.

Quantum Mechanics is based on stochastic randomness, that is it is truly random, truly probability based. If there is a structure underlying it then it must also be the structure underlying randomness itself.

[Image: nnano.2012.34-f3.jpg]

The results of sending a ton of these substances through the double slit.


Yeah, but how many double slits do we have in our brains?

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05-02-2013, 09:50 PM (This post was last modified: 05-02-2013 10:09 PM by fstratzero.)
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 09:43 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(05-02-2013 09:37 PM)fstratzero Wrote:  [Image: nnano.2012.34-f3.jpg]

The results of sending a ton of these substances through the double slit.


Yeah, but how many double slits do we have in our brains?
I would have to say 0, but the idea that entire molecules exhibit this duality is interesting. I think the question is how does nature deal with this or operate in spite of that effect.



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05-02-2013, 10:07 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 09:43 PM)Chas Wrote:  Yeah, but how many double slits do we have in our brains?


Do you realize what you just implied? That the quantum mechanical properties in particles and molecules is dependent on a particles path through two slits. Undecided

It doesn't matter if there are slits or not. The wave property doesn't only exist when the particle is presented with two slits, that would imply the particle knows what slits are. The double slit experiment is a way for us to determine if a particle acts like a wave or not.

Wikipedia Wrote:The double-slit experiment, sometimes called Young's experiment (after Young's interference experiment), is a demonstration that matter and energy can display characteristics of both waves and particles, and demonstrates the fundamentally probabilistic nature of quantum mechanical phenomena.

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05-02-2013, 10:15 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 10:07 PM)Aspchizo Wrote:  
(05-02-2013 09:43 PM)Chas Wrote:  Yeah, but how many double slits do we have in our brains?


Do you realize what you just implied? That the quantum mechanical properties in particles and molecules is dependent on a particles path through two slits. Undecided

It doesn't matter if there are slits or not. The wave property doesn't only exist when the particle is presented with two slits, that would imply the particle knows what slits are. The double slit experiment is a way for us to determine if a particle acts like a wave or not.

Wikipedia Wrote:The double-slit experiment, sometimes called Young's experiment (after Young's interference experiment), is a demonstration that matter and energy can display characteristics of both waves and particles, and demonstrates the fundamentally probabilistic nature of quantum mechanical phenomena.
Well responding to how it effects the brain is hard with out knowing all the particulars of the experiment. Personally I don't have the money to buy the article. Confused

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05-02-2013, 10:22 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 10:15 PM)fstratzero Wrote:  Well responding to how it effects the brain is hard with out knowing all the particulars of the experiment. Personally I don't have the money to buy the article. Confused

Uhhh, can you rephrase? lol

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05-02-2013, 10:24 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 10:22 PM)Aspchizo Wrote:  
(05-02-2013 10:15 PM)fstratzero Wrote:  Well responding to how it effects the brain is hard with out knowing all the particulars of the experiment. Personally I don't have the money to buy the article. Confused

Uhhh, can you rephrase? lol
Without being able to know how they did their experiment, distances involved, etc...

It's hard to respond, otherwise I'd be committing an argument from ignorance.

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05-02-2013, 10:28 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 10:07 PM)Aspchizo Wrote:  
(05-02-2013 09:43 PM)Chas Wrote:  Yeah, but how many double slits do we have in our brains?


Do you realize what you just implied? That the quantum mechanical properties in particles and molecules is dependent on a particles path through two slits. Undecided

It doesn't matter if there are slits or not. The wave property doesn't only exist when the particle is presented with two slits, that would imply the particle knows what slits are. The double slit experiment is a way for us to determine if a particle acts like a wave or not.

Wikipedia Wrote:The double-slit experiment, sometimes called Young's experiment (after Young's interference experiment), is a demonstration that matter and energy can display characteristics of both waves and particles, and demonstrates the fundamentally probabilistic nature of quantum mechanical phenomena.


Hmmm, do you need to join Vosur for the humor module implant? Consider

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05-02-2013, 10:52 PM
RE: Quantum mechanical effects in the Brain
(05-02-2013 10:24 PM)fstratzero Wrote:  Without being able to know how they did their experiment, distances involved, etc...

It's hard to respond, otherwise I'd be committing an argument from ignorance.

Ok that made more sense to me Tongue

Well if you want to assume the conditions of the experiment are the cause of the wave behaviour, sure. I think the experiment is a way for us to see the effects of a particle that behaves like a wave rather than that the experiment caused it.

There is much more room for a particle that participates in the double slit experiment than one that occupies a synapse. However uncertainty due to the wave-like properties wouldn't break down due to a lack of breathing space.

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