Question about logical fallacies
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21-06-2013, 08:51 AM
Question about logical fallacies
A theist says to me "you know nothing about eschatology". This has got to be some kind of logical fallacy but I don't know what. It's the flip side of appeal to authority. Instead of saying his position is true because some authority says so, he's saying my position is false because I'm not an authority. Is there a name for this kind of fallacy?

Same guy asks me "are you really saying that Christians did not believe in the resurrection until the 19th century?" I never said any such thing, nor did I say anything that would lead to that conclusion. Is this a straw man, red herring or something else?

What exactly is the difference between a straw man and a red herring?

By the way, I had to look up "eschatology".

Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice Is also great
And would suffice. -- Robert Frost
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21-06-2013, 09:40 AM
RE: Question about logical fallacies
He speak to you about "eschatology" (pseudo-science about the study of the end of the world).

In eschatology people use concordism and correlation with theirs sacred books. Therefore a verse can means what you want.

1.Straw man or Strawman :
A.Wikipedia
B.Wiktionary
C.Oxford Dictionary

2.Red Herring :
A.Wikipedia
B.Wiktionary
C.Oxford Dictionary

Video about eschatology with the method of concordism (I like this fucking music to manipulate people more easily) : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUOJdsItxvA
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21-06-2013, 09:56 AM
RE: Question about logical fallacies
In any point in my life prior to now, I would have assumed that "eschatology" had to do with poop. Thank you for enlightening me. I will be going now.

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21-06-2013, 10:01 AM
Re: Question about logical fallacies
Copro is the prefix for feces. Like coprophagy or coprolite.

Evolve
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21-06-2013, 10:01 AM
RE: Question about logical fallacies
(21-06-2013 09:56 AM)DancingSkeletons Wrote:  In any point in my life prior to now, I would have assumed that "eschatology" had to do with poop. Thank you for enlightening me. I will be going now.

That's "scatology". But they are very similar.Drinking Beverage

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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21-06-2013, 10:05 AM
Re: Question about logical fallacies
He's about 2000 years late to the party.

" I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance."
Socrates

At the very least, all he can say is that even as someone who has studied it, he does not know it all. And if you don't know everything, then you know nothing.

His argument/dismissal works both ways Thumbsup

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22-06-2013, 11:25 AM
RE: Question about logical fallacies
There's a listing of fallacies on Wikipedia that may be helpful.

A Christian telling you that "you know nothing about eschatology" may or may not be fallacious. If that is the entirety of his argument, it's Ad Hominem, because he's attacking you rather than your arguments. However, if you were trying to tell him what the bible says about the end of the world and he argued that you had it wrong, then he's just rebutting your arguments and the way to solve it is through citing the bible.

If he said "are you really saying that Christians did not believe in the resurrection until the 19th century?" and you weren't, it's only a straw man if he goes on to argue that without getting an answer. It could just be a simple misunderstanding, and in that case he was just asking for clarification -- that's not a fallacy, but rather just polite debating.

But, before you learn about logical fallacies, the most important one to learn may be the "Argument from Fallacy". That's where one person calls the other's viewpoint wrong just because they made a logical error... that person could be misusing logic but still have the right conclusion. If your opponent makes arguments that are logically fallacious, point out the mistake and then give him a chance to correct it and instead make an argument that isn't fallacious. Remember to keep an open mind and not automatically assume his argument must be wrong or logically erroneous in some way, because you know that if he approached your arguments with the same mindset that neither of you could ever convince each other. And if he points out your logical errors, fix them and move on -- we all make mistakes, even those of us who study them regularly. Making a mistake doesn't mean that you're wrong, but rather that you made a wrong argument, and that's always fixable.

My girlfriend is mad at me. Perhaps I shouldn't have tried cooking a stick in her non-stick pan.
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