Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
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04-12-2012, 04:51 PM (This post was last modified: 04-12-2012 04:57 PM by PoolBoyG.)
Question Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
How did you wean off smoking, or drinking?

I understand there's physical addiction (your body becomes physically ill until you can get your next fix), or there's some social pressure (only way to fit in with certain people, or locations), or you found nothing wrong with it, at all. I'd like to know peoples methods who had to face all of these.
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04-12-2012, 05:09 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(04-12-2012 04:51 PM)poolboyg88 Wrote:  How did you wean off smoking, or drinking?

I understand there's physical addiction (your body becomes physically ill until you can get your next fix), or there's some social pressure (only way to fit in with certain people, or locations), or you found nothing wrong with it, at all. I'd like to know peoples methods who had to face all of these.
There seem to be two ways to beat addiction.

The addict is forced to go through detox and is then kept away from the substance.
The addict chooses to go through detox and is then stays away from the substance.

Seriously, though, I had to get to the point where I couldn't live without alcohol but I couldn't continue to live with alcohol.
It was killing me, ruining my life. Alcohol had stopped working, the medicine was now the disease.

The support of other recovering alcoholics is key. They keep it real, they keep it fresh, they keep it honest.

I have quit smoking several times, but it hasn't stuck. I keep trying.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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04-12-2012, 05:53 PM (This post was last modified: 04-12-2012 05:58 PM by Leela.)
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
I'll just give you my story of stopping this addiction:

Well at my highest point I smoked two packs a day, but the fact that it was getting really expensive didn't bother me too much although I didn't have the money. The fact that I have asthma also did not bother me at all.

After moving in with my bf back then (who is now the hubby) we decided to stop smoking for health and financial reasons. But it only worked for a short time and we were back to it.

When I moved to Ireland to prepare my life with my hun there, and basically both our futures depended on me being and doing ok something happened. My lung started making problems. Had I been almost symptom free from my asthma now it started showing. I was out of breath from basically nothing. And then it started to become ugly because my lung started hurting. And I mean it was hurting like crap. Breathing alone hurt so bad that I thought I will die, I worked at a callcenter at that time, imagine you have to talk 8 hours a day when breathing already hurts. I did not have the money to see a doctor at the time either.
But I realized that if I fail my hubby and I are going to starve to death in Romania. I was using the last money we had to start the life in Ireland. I was buying cigarettes instead of food at that point and was running low on money.
So being scared of failing, running low on money like that, and feeling like dieing just from breathing normally made me stop.
And I still do feel like smoking sometimes and then I remind myself that I would like to live a few more years.

Before we moved back to Romania a few months ago I had a very stressful phase and I nearly restarted smoking. Meaning I smoked for about a week, and I immediately, with my first cigarette, felt the pain in my lungs back. And after two or three days I caught a very nasty lung infection. It was indeed so nasty that my doctor got scared. He gave me a better asthma spray and 4 different medications and sent me home to bed. I had to stay in bed for 5 days and was not allowed anything but going to the toilet and back to bed. I had to eat a breakfast lunch and dinner that consisted of 13 pills everytime in the beginning. I went back to work still eating 8 pills with each meal.

And that was the last time I touched a cigarette.
And still I feel like smoking, when I am stressed out or very worried, but knowing that I will literally die from it within days keeps me on track very much.

So for me it needed the shock of "I am really dieing if I keep smoking" to actually take it seriously.

The pictures on the packs never bothered me, knowing about risks and lung cancer never bothered me, it needed me to nearly die from it to stop for ever.


What I recommend is, when you decide you stop smoking you do not have that last pack or last cigarette, because that will make you miss it even more. Also never ever touch a cigarette again once you stopped. If you take just one little breath from it you will be back on it!
I warn you a little. Withdrawl is of course not as bad as from Cocaine or so but it is not fun either. You will have very realistic dreams of smoking and you will probably wake up with a very bad conscious because you think you really did smoke. You will think about it a lot. The first 5 days or so is the physical withdrawl and you will be shaky and nervous and annoyed and probably dizzy and sick and restless....
I do not recommend to put anything in your mouth instead of smoking and no nikotine plasters or shit like that. If you put something else in your mouth (a candy, a carrot, a coffee,...) you are just replacing one addiction with the next one. If you feel weird not having that cigarette you consciously do something else. Like physically. Go to the bathroom and wash your hands if there is nothing else you can do. When you relax and you feel like smoking just count on yourself being to damn lazy to get up and find a shop to buy that.
Something else you can do, which is probably pretty nice. Estimate how much you spend on cigarettes per week. Once you stop you will put that money away every week. Don't spend it. And set yourself a milestone. Like after the first month you take the saved money and buy something nice, or go out, stuff like that. Or keep it and save up for something big so you can say "look at this TV, I could buy that BECAUSE I stopped smoking!!"


I hope that helped a little?

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04-12-2012, 05:56 PM
Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(04-12-2012 05:09 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(04-12-2012 04:51 PM)poolboyg88 Wrote:  How did you wean off smoking, or drinking?

I understand there's physical addiction (your body becomes physically ill until you can get your next fix), or there's some social pressure (only way to fit in with certain people, or locations), or you found nothing wrong with it, at all. I'd like to know peoples methods who had to face all of these.
There seem to be two ways to beat addiction.

The addict is forced to go through detox and is then kept away from the substance.
The addict chooses to go through detox and is then stays away from the substance.

Seriously, though, I had to get to the point where I couldn't live without alcohol but I couldn't continue to live with alcohol.
It was killing me, ruining my life. Alcohol had stopped working, the medicine was now the disease.

The support of other recovering alcoholics is key. They keep it real, they keep it fresh, they keep it honest.

I have quit smoking several times, but it hasn't stuck. I keep trying.

You're forgetting the third way.

Miraculous intervention from God.

The only downside is, it could turn you into a Calvinist.


Tongue










(With apologies to my favorite forum theist.) Big Grin

"All that is necessary for the triumph of Calvinism is that good Atheists do nothing." ~Eric Oh My
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04-12-2012, 06:00 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(04-12-2012 05:56 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  You're forgetting the third way.

Miraculous intervention from God.


Well, yeah, how the hell did I miss that one? Consider

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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04-12-2012, 06:02 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(04-12-2012 05:53 PM)Leela Wrote:  ... If you feel weird not having that cigarette you consciously do something else. Like physically. Go to the bathroom and wash your hands if there is nothing else you can do. When you relax and you feel like smoking just count on yourself being to damn lazy to get up and find a shop to buy that.
Something else you can do, which is probably pretty nice. Estimate how much you spend on cigarettes per week. Once you stop you will put that money away every week. Don't spend it. And set yourself a milestone. Like after the first month you take the saved money and buy something nice, or go out, stuff like that. Or keep it and save up for something big so you can say "look at this TV, I could buy that BECAUSE I stopped smoking!!"
My brother went and brushed his teeth every time he wanted a smoke.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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04-12-2012, 07:21 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
I smoked for a looooooong ass time. I tried quitting many times.
I no longer smoke. At one point I just said I was done. And so I was. Previously I tried the patch, dies, replacement therapy, cold turkey... nothing worked. Then when I decided I was done it worked.

Wierd to because I liked smoking, and I still miss it nearly four years later. I am glad to be rid of the expense, and the smell, and the constant urge to smoke. But I miss the act of smoking. I loved having a smoke outside on a cold day while having a coffee. Or smoking while reading/computering. I used to drink to though I've never been addicted, but it seriously affected my smoking. If I drank I would always have a cigarette in my hand until I was asleep.

My family has a history for alcoholism and addictive behaviour. I dislike alcohol and the effect it has on me, always have even when I was drinking often (ie, my youth). Whenever I could I would steer the conversation of intoxication over to marijuana. I used to smoke a lot of pot. Like so much I had to sell it to not be homeless. I was never chemically addicted to that either, I just really enjoyed being high as a kite and watching cartoons or talking about cereal and other Wierd shit.

Now I do nothing. I almost never drink, and on the rare occasion I do it's like just a couple beers (or maybe a gin and tonic)
I never smoke anything. Not cigarettes, and not mary jane.

I stopped smoking weed because it was holding me back from things I wanted to do, and if you're going to do something narcotic related you should try and be responsible with it. Now I just couldn't care less.

"I think of myself as an intelligent, sensitive human being with the soul of a clown which always forces me to blow it at the most important moments." -Jim Morrison
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05-12-2012, 04:48 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
This product should help you guys. Wink



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05-12-2012, 05:19 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(04-12-2012 04:51 PM)poolboyg88 Wrote:  How did you wean off smoking, or drinking?

I understand there's physical addiction (your body becomes physically ill until you can get your next fix), or there's some social pressure (only way to fit in with certain people, or locations), or you found nothing wrong with it, at all. I'd like to know peoples methods who had to face all of these.
I sort of just gave up smoking 35 years ago at 35. Must have been a sort of silent epiphany as there were minimal side effects.

Alcohol and prescription drugs are another story. At age 52 I spent 5 weeks in de-tox which involved keeping a daily diary, read by the former alkie councellors, who would insult you, along with your fellow addicts, a taper, and frequent visits to the local .A.A. and N.A. quasi religious centres where I choked on coffee and cigarette smoke.
It worked inasmuch as from that period my alcohol and benzo intake reduced considerably.....but do I give them unwarranted credit?

Today I am 16 days off benzos (don't work any more except adversely) and 15 days off the booze, largely due to some scarey liver enzyme readings and a cat scan. Also a past life review, a read up on alcohol's dangers etc and probably old age has hopefully tipped the scales. Even moderation can be bad in some things. Confused
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05-12-2012, 05:34 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(04-12-2012 05:56 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  
(04-12-2012 05:09 PM)Chas Wrote:  There seem to be two ways to beat addiction.

The addict is forced to go through detox and is then kept away from the substance.
The addict chooses to go through detox and is then stays away from the substance.

Seriously, though, I had to get to the point where I couldn't live without alcohol but I couldn't continue to live with alcohol.
It was killing me, ruining my life. Alcohol had stopped working, the medicine was now the disease.

The support of other recovering alcoholics is key. They keep it real, they keep it fresh, they keep it honest.

I have quit smoking several times, but it hasn't stuck. I keep trying.

You're forgetting the third way.

Miraculous intervention from God.

The only downside is, it could turn you into a Calvinist.


Tongue










(With apologies to my favorite forum theist.) Big Grin
Gwynnies. Heart

If yer sitting around doing nothing, you must choose to imbibe. Thing to remember, choose no every time the choice comes up. Then, inertia ftw. Smartass

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