Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
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05-12-2012, 05:50 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(05-12-2012 05:34 PM)houseofcantor Wrote:  
(04-12-2012 05:56 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  You're forgetting the third way.

Miraculous intervention from God.

The only downside is, it could turn you into a Calvinist.


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If yer sitting around doing nothing, you must choose to imbibe. Thing to remember, choose no every time the choice comes up. Then, inertia ftw. Smartass
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07-12-2012, 06:57 AM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
I just stopped buying my cigarettes and after my friends started nagging me for constantly taking their cigarettes, I have stopped smoking, because eventually, I didn't have anything to smoke. I have made myself stop.

As for alcohol, I smoke a lot of weed, so alcohol just kinda fell off the map, all by itself. I still drink from time to time, but it's maybe once every 2 months.

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07-12-2012, 11:00 AM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
Based on my experience, I seriously doubt that smoking creates a real addiction. I suppose it depends on how you define addiction. If you like to exercise and you overdo it, I suppose you can stretch the meaning and say that you are addicted to it, but I seriously doubt that you will feel ill if you don't do it for a while. Just the same, I never experienced sickness or weakness whenever I skipped a few days of smoking. I just kept wanting to do it until one day, after 16 years of smoking on and off, but mostly on, I simply stopped. For a few days before quitting I kept going back to the pack of cigarettes because I felt that something is missing and each time, halfway through the cigarette, I realized that my sense of dissatisfaction was still there and the cigarette was not helping.It just made me feel a little weaker and sicker for a few minutes.

I stopped buying them and a few months passed since. I never missed them yet. I didn't drop them because I was afraid they were killing me. I am lucky enough to have good DNA. I am very healthy, my grandparents are very old and alive, and nobody in my family died of cancer. I have close relatives who smoked for 30-40 years before they finally quit and they are still alive and pretty healthy for their age. My 16 years of smoking didn't touch my health in any way I can observe and I am stubborn. Nobody scared me into quitting. Fuck, even my doctor smokes. It was just time to quit and I had no difficulty doing it.

Now try to replace cigarettes in my story with heroin, meth, or even alcohol. It's simply not the same. If you are a 20 beers a day kind of guy, going suddenly from 20 to zero can literally fry your nervous system and kill you. You need at least 6-7 beers to function at all. However, you can smoke 20-40 cigarettes a day and simply stop doing it. It is a bad habit and a difficult one to unlearn sometimes, but it is really not worthy of being called an addiction.

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07-12-2012, 11:03 AM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(07-12-2012 11:00 AM)Malleus Wrote:  Based on my experience, I seriously doubt that smoking creates a real addiction. I suppose it depends on how you define addiction. If you like to exercise and you overdo it, I suppose you can stretch the meaning and say that you are addicted to it, but I seriously doubt that you will feel ill if you don't do it for a while. Just the same, I never experienced sickness or weakness whenever I skipped a few days of smoking. I just kept wanting to do it until one day, after 16 years of smoking on and off, but mostly on, I simply stopped. For a few days before quitting I kept going back to the pack of cigarettes because I felt that something is missing and each time, halfway through the cigarette, I realized that my sense of dissatisfaction was still there and the cigarette was not helping.It just made me feel a little weaker and sicker for a few minutes.

I stopped buying them and a few months passed since. I never missed them yet. I didn't drop them because I was afraid they were killing me. I am lucky enough to have good DNA. I am very healthy, my grandparents are very old and alive, and nobody in my family died of cancer. I have close relatives who smoked for 30-40 years before they finally quit and they are still alive and pretty healthy for their age. My 16 years of smoking didn't touch my health in any way I can observe and I am stubborn. Nobody scared me into quitting. Fuck, even my doctor smokes. It was just time to quit and I had no difficulty doing it.

Now try to replace cigarettes in my story with heroin, meth, or even alcohol. It's simply not the same. If you are a 20 beers a day kind of guy, going suddenly from 20 to zero can literally fry your nervous system and kill you. You need at least 6-7 beers to function at all. However, you can smoke 20-40 cigarettes a day and simply stop doing it. It is a bad habit and a difficult one to unlearn sometimes, but it is really not worthy of being called an addiction.
No, nicotine is physically addictive; but like any substance, the effect varies from person to person.

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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07-12-2012, 12:47 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
I agree with Chas.

Although I know that for Malleus it is true. I did not see any physical reactions when he stopped.
BUT, Mr. Husband, you were easily annoyed and very annoying for me for a few days. I am happy, that you told me that you were quitting cigarettes, otherwise there might have been fights.

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07-12-2012, 03:44 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
I smoke, but I often take a few days off or stop for a couple of weeks at a time. I always feel fine. I have never felt like I actually needed a smoke. I have also never felt ill or anything when I was not smoking. I guess it just affects me differently. Although, I roll my own... I don't like cigarettes. They are too big and have too much tobacco in them for me. I feel sick after a whole one, so a small rolly serves me well.

I smoke weed quite a lot aswell... I just got some of the smelliest shit I have ever had before. It is stinking out my entire house even though it is sealed away in a baggy within a tobacco bag within a metal money box. It is quite lovely. Tongue

I also drink quite often, but I'm Scottish, so it is allowed.

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07-12-2012, 03:51 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
(07-12-2012 03:44 PM)frankiej Wrote:  I also drink quite often, but I'm Scottish, so it is allowed expected.
fixt. Drinking Beverage

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08-12-2012, 09:55 AM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
I struggled with trying to quit drinking off and on for several years, because I recognized that it turned me in to a unmotivated vegetable. I even quit a few times, but never said that it was "once and for all", only that I figured it would be better if I quit. I never felt like I "hit bottom" in the AA sense, and from what I could read AA culture/school of thought made it seem like I was not really addicted if I did not hit bottom, or if I could manage to quit on my own. The reason I decided I needed to quit was that I started to pay attention to my emotional state, and realized that being intoxicated was putting me in a negative emotional state - down on myself, depressed about life, etc.

It was negatively affecting my decision making.
It was making me not care too much that I was coasting through life, waiting for life to happen to me, rather than directing my own outcome.
I also started to realize it was affecting my marriage, in that we, as a couple, were never not drinking, and I came to realize I did not know my wife without drink, at all.


Eventually, during midlife crisis related web-based soul searching, I ran across a web site called Rational Recovery that is all about quitting on your own, without having to subscribe the the AA culture & mindset. After reading through I just quit, that is all.

The "free time to think" that permanent sobriety suddenly provided, eventually led me here, to atheism -- The idea of internal locus of control applied to both quitting drinking, and to recognizing passive gods-will, you-ought-to-be-ashamed-to-be-human christianity as bs,and as what was preventing me from living.
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10-12-2012, 05:40 AM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
Malleus, tobacco is one of the most addictive substances. Physical addiction is pretty strong, but mental is even worse.

[Image: mean_physical_harm_and_mean_dependence.png]

As you can see here, tobacco rates pretty high on dependence, even more than alcohol. This "dependence" is both physical and mental type of addiction, but they both play equal parts in the overall addiction equation. I would say that physical addiction is actually easier to get rid of than mental. You can feel the pain and you can fight the pain and you can hate the pain, so you have an enemy to fight. Mental addiction is hard to define, it is secret, it is silent, like a ninja, it sneaks up to you and you have no idea that it's got its hands around your neck.

An example. Cannabis and smoking joints gives you no physical addiction, but I have problems with myself is I do not have weed in my smoking hours... These are not big problems, actually, not problems at all, but I am nervous, I get agitated really quick, I yell at people, I am highly hyperactive, full of energy, my thoughts are overwhelming, too much ideas...

I have to make an observation about this joint-addiction. I always smoke my joints with tobacco, so I have a problem with separating what addiction is troubling me. Am I slightly addicted to every-day joints or does a few tobaccos in my joints make me slightly addicted to tobacco? I would say both. In a small way, both of these shits are troubling me, but I think that tobacco makes me even physically addicted. A few cigarettes a day is still a few cigarettes a day, little, but still there.

Beware of the silent assassin, the tobacco.

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04-01-2013, 08:35 PM
RE: Question for past smokers, and alcoholics...
I drank, heavily, for well over two decades. In 2005, I was diagnosed with cirrhosis and Hep C. Doc said to stop drinking immediately, so I did. Right then. Haven't had a drink since. But your question was, "how?"

I've always enjoyed writing and wrote snippets of a story or two, never finishing one, for years. I bought a book called "No Plot? No Problem!" The author, Chris Baty, gives a "recipe" for finishing a 50,000-word novel in 30 days. In this book (it's about 50,000 words long), he tells what preparations to make, how to write that much, and so on. I was diagnosed on January 15, so on January 29, I started writing so as to have my 30 days in by February 28. While that 30 days was rough, writing that much with very little planning, I knew that if I could go that long without a drink, it would be easy from then on. I finished my 50,000 words on 2/28/2005 with a completed, if rough, novel.

If this sounds vaguely familiar, Chris' book has become the annual National Novel Writing Month, which you can join for free at NaNoWriMo dot org. It's a non-profit organization of groups and individuals throughout the world that get together to write a 50K-word novel every November. Many people "compete" every year (that is, they do it over and over every November). You "win" if you finish your novel. There's likely a group close to where you are that you can join and get together with like-minded folks to hack out your own novel in 30 days. Check it out. They also have a national script writing month in June or something, if you'd prefer that to a novel. Script, screenplay, I forget.

Anyway, that's how I stopped. I don't think it would work for everyone, but I've always felt that if something was controlling my life, I could kick it and not look back. I did it with amphetamines in my teens, and alcohol in my 40s.

Hope that helps.
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