Question for the Brits here...
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27-08-2017, 04:34 PM
Question for the Brits here...
Description for a role in a play that I would like to play----she is described as an aging American actress returning to the stage to play a British housekeeper, a "woman of character." This is a whole play within a play thing, first as herself (the American) rehearsing the role for the play where she is the British housekeeper who is the one described as a "woman of character."

Everything I've read in the script has her coming across (to me) as a cockney-type "character" (sort of an Eliza Doolittle "before") and I base that on some of the things she says as well as her grammar. But is this a description that a Brit would immediately understand means for her to be played instead as a more refined person (call it, Eliza Doolittle "after") type accent?

I've already auditioned so the time for changing up has come and gone, but now I'm curious. Especially since another person auditioning took the more refined accent route. Yes, I could have found several versions of the play on YouTube I'm sure, but I make a point of not doing that so that I don't immediately try to become an imitation of whatever I see online. I'd rather give my own take on it and then if I get the part, it's well, me, not an imitation of someone else specific.

Anyway, it's written by an English playwright, so, what say you any British friends here----what is your take on the description "a woman of character" when it comes to a stage role? Thanks!

Where are we going and why am I in this hand basket?
"Life is not all lovely thorns and singing vultures, you know." ~ Morticia Addams
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27-08-2017, 04:37 PM
RE: Question for the Brits here...
What play/author/period?

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27-08-2017, 04:38 PM (This post was last modified: 27-08-2017 05:37 PM by outtathereligioncloset.)
RE: Question for the Brits here...
EDIT: On second thought, answering that question here would give enough info for someone who wanted to "out" me IRL to be able to do so. I have an instinct that Banjo would not be the kind of person here to want to do that, but we DO have some trolls who...

Well, hopefully it isn't too late already.

Banjo, I PM'd the answer to you, since you asked, and I trust you...

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27-08-2017, 06:19 PM (This post was last modified: 27-08-2017 06:22 PM by dancefortwo.)
RE: Question for the Brits here...
(27-08-2017 04:38 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  EDIT: On second thought, answering that question here would give enough info for someone who wanted to "out" me IRL to be able to do so. I have an instinct that Banjo would not be the kind of person here to want to do that, but we DO have some trolls who...

Well, hopefully it isn't too late already.

Banjo, I PM'd the answer to you, since you asked, and I trust you...

Wait, are you asking people to guess the name of the play? Is it a Noel Coward play? I'm not familiar with all of his plays though so I might be totally off.

Edit to add: How about Noises Off???

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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27-08-2017, 06:29 PM
RE: Question for the Brits here...
It's something about farts.

Smile

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
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27-08-2017, 07:40 PM
RE: Question for the Brits here...
Banjo, you are a riot!




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29-08-2017, 04:31 AM
RE: Question for the Brits here...
I'd go with the less refined accent if she's a housekeeper and a more refined accent if a governess or a nanny, that's my take as a Brit.
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29-08-2017, 05:00 AM
RE: Question for the Brits here...
(27-08-2017 04:34 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  Anyway, it's written by an English playwright, so, what say you any British friends here----what is your take on the description "a woman of character" when it comes to a stage role? Thanks!
Generally a person "of Character" is somebody of good moral standing, or generally have a good moral compass, if that makes sense.

Those who were house keepers or butlers/maids etc, where normally of lower class, but had to in themselves "act the part". So for example, they would be honest people who would work hard to earn there money, and speak most likely in their native accent, but "pronunciat" themselves a bit more, as to be more appealing to the upper classes. With all the usual trimming of "Yes sir/no miss etc"

Personally I would suggest playing it in a slightly toned down "BBC English" voice, with a soft cockney twang, if possible

Hope that helps Smile

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(18-09-2017 09:47 AM)vahaaao Wrote:  Irresponsible bachelor daddy
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29-08-2017, 05:19 AM
RE: Question for the Brits here...
(27-08-2017 04:34 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  ...
"woman of character."
...

Ex-hooker.

Yes

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29-08-2017, 12:36 PM
RE: Question for the Brits here...
(29-08-2017 05:00 AM)OakTree500 Wrote:  
(27-08-2017 04:34 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  Anyway, it's written by an English playwright, so, what say you any British friends here----what is your take on the description "a woman of character" when it comes to a stage role? Thanks!
Generally a person "of Character" is somebody of good moral standing, or generally have a good moral compass, if that makes sense.

Those who were house keepers or butlers/maids etc, where normally of lower class, but had to in themselves "act the part". So for example, they would be honest people who would work hard to earn there money, and speak most likely in their native accent, but "pronunciat" themselves a bit more, as to be more appealing to the upper classes. With all the usual trimming of "Yes sir/no miss etc"

Personally I would suggest playing it in a slightly toned down "BBC English" voice, with a soft cockney twang, if possible

Hope that helps Smile

OT5,

Agreed. For us Brits a 'woman of character' is a solid character, not a joker. No need for posh, but certainly decent and good moral character. The type can be found in the TV series 'Upstairs Downstairs'.

D.
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