Quit Smoking
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11-07-2013, 07:44 AM
RE: Quit Smoking
(15-04-2013 01:25 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Cigarettes that is. Wink

Today is five weeks since I quit. This has always been one of the hardest benchmarks for me to reach (this ain't my first dance with the quit demon). Cravings are brutal right now. In fact, I think the cravings are part of the reason for my insomnia the last few days.

Dammit this sucks!

Cigarettes or wacky tobaccy, Stark?

"IN THRUST WE TRUST"

"We were conservative Jews and that meant we obeyed God's Commandments until His rules became a royal pain in the ass."

- Joel Chastnoff, The 188th Crybaby Brigade
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12-07-2013, 09:15 AM (This post was last modified: 12-07-2013 09:21 AM by joben1.)
RE: Quit Smoking
If you want to quit totally, why not try ecigs? Many have done it by reducing the nic content of the ejuice over time to zero. A lot easier than cold turkey.

Personally, I enjoyed smoking and enjoyed the nicotine hit. You get as close as you can get to smoking by using ecigs. This is why ecigs are perfect for me. Still get all the enjoyment whilst reducing the harmful effects to as near zero as drinking coffee.
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12-07-2013, 09:36 AM
RE: Quit Smoking
When I quit it helped me to know the 'good' it was doing, even if I couldn't see it or feel it.

So here's a timetable of what happens after you quit.

Within ...


• 20 minutes
Your blood pressure, pulse rate and the temperature of your hands and feet have returned to normal.

• 8 hours
Remaining nicotine in your bloodstream will have fallen to 6.25% of normal peak daily levels, a 93.75% reduction.

• 12 hours
Your blood oxygen level will have increased to normal and carbon monoxide levels will have dropped to normal.

• 24 hours
Anxieties have peaked in intensity and within two weeks should return to near pre-cessation levels.

• 48 hours
Damaged nerve endings have started to regrow and your sense of smell and taste are beginning to return to normal. Cessation anger and irritability will have peaked.

• 72 hours
Your entire body will test 100% nicotine-free and over 90% of all nicotine metabolites (the chemicals it breaks down into) will now have passed from your body via your urine. Symptoms of chemical withdrawal have peaked in intensity, including restlessness. The number of cue induced crave episodes experienced during any quitting day will peak for the "average" ex-user. Lung bronchial tubes leading to air sacs (alveoli) are beginning to relax in recovering smokers. Breathing is becoming easier and the lung's functional abilities are starting to increase.


• 5 - 8 days
The "average" ex-smoker will encounter an "average" of three cue induced crave episodes per day. Although we may not be "average" and although serious cessation time distortion can make minutes feel like hours, it is unlikely that any single episode will last longer than 3 minutes. Keep a clock handy and time them.

• 10 days
10 days - The "average" ex-user is down to encountering less than two crave episodes per day, each less than 3 minutes.


• 10 days to 2 weeks
Recovery has likely progressed to the point where your addiction is no longer doing the talking. Blood circulation in your gums and teeth are now similar to that of a non-user.

• 2 to 4 weeks
Cessation related anger, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, impatience, insomnia, restlessness and depression have ended. If still experiencing any of these symptoms get seen and evaluated by your physician.

• 21 days
Brain acetylcholine receptor counts that were up-regulated in response to nicotine's presence have now down-regulated and receptor binding has returned to levels seen in the brains of non-smokers.

• 2 weeks to 3 months
Your heart attack risk has started to drop. Your lung function is beginning to improve.

• 3 weeks to 3 months
Your circulation has substantially improved. Walking has become easier. Your chronic cough, if any, has likely disappeared. If not, get seen by a doctor, and sooner if at all concerned, as a chronic cough can be a sign of lung cancer.

• 8 weeks
Insulin resistance in smokers has normalized despite average weight gain of 2.7 kg (1997 study).

• 1 to 9 months
Any smoking related sinus congestion, fatigue or shortness of breath have decreased. Cilia have regrown in your lungs, thereby increasing their ability to handle mucus, keep your lungs clean and reduce infections. Your body's overall energy has increased.

• 1 year
Your excess risk of coronary heart disease, heart attack and stroke have dropped to less than half that of a smoker.

• 5 years
Your risk of a subarachnoid haemorrhage has declined to 59% of your risk while still smoking (2012 study). If a female ex-smoker, your risk of developing diabetes is now that of a non-smoker (2001 study).

• 5 to 15 years
Your risk of stroke has declined to that of a non-smoker.

• 10 years
Your risk of being diagnosed with lung cancer is between 30% and 50% of that for a continuing smoker (2005 study). Risk of death from lung cancer has declined by almost half if you were an average smoker (one pack per day). Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus and pancreas have declined. Risk of developing diabetes for both men and women is now similar to that of a never-smoker (2001 study).

• 13 years
The average smoker able to live to age 75 has 5.8 fewer teeth than a non-smoker (1998 study). But by year 13 after quitting, your risk of smoking induced tooth loss has declined to that of a never-smoker (2006 study).

• 15 years
Your risk of coronary heart disease is now that of a person who has never smoked. Your risk of pancreatic cancer has declined to that of a never-smoker (2011 study - but note 2nd pancreatic making identical finding at 20 years).

• 20 years
Female excess risk of death from all smoking related causes, including lung disease and cancer, has now reduced to that of a never-smoker (2008 study). Risk of pancreatic cancer reduced to that of a never-smoker (2011 study).


source


Be excellent to each other and party on, Dudes!
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12-07-2013, 09:42 AM
RE: Quit Smoking
Nice list.
I stopped 5 times,but i began 6 times.
I always relapse after 3-4 weeks.
Now,i considder reducing to 1 a day a huge archievement,but i used to stop for weeks the first year i smoked...

KC IS A LIAR!!!! HE PROMISED ME VANILLA CAKES AND GAVE ME STRAWBERRY CAKE Weeping
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12-07-2013, 09:45 AM
RE: Quit Smoking
One of the things I did was switch brand. If you REALLY want a cig- then smoke something you consider 'nasty'. You get the craving satisfied, but you don't enjoy it. Take the pleasure of smoking away and you are less likely to do it.


Be excellent to each other and party on, Dudes!
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12-07-2013, 09:47 AM
RE: Quit Smoking
Well,i enjoy all cigs.
Camer,pall mall,dunhill,marlboro,capital,rolling my own,ect.
I'm considering buying an ecig,but thats illegal here...

KC IS A LIAR!!!! HE PROMISED ME VANILLA CAKES AND GAVE ME STRAWBERRY CAKE Weeping
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12-07-2013, 09:57 AM
RE: Quit Smoking
(12-07-2013 09:47 AM)Lightvader Wrote:  Well,i enjoy all cigs.
Camer,pall mall,dunhill,marlboro,capital,rolling my own,ect.
I'm considering buying an ecig,but thats illegal here...

That makes me SO angry! There is NO reason to ban ecigs and every reason to encourage existing smokers who don't want to quit to switch to them.
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12-07-2013, 10:36 AM
RE: Quit Smoking
Yeah,it makes me mad!
Cigs are legal,but e-cigs arent!
I honestly never saw it as a way to stop,but as a way to get my daily nicotine hit in a less harmfull way.

KC IS A LIAR!!!! HE PROMISED ME VANILLA CAKES AND GAVE ME STRAWBERRY CAKE Weeping
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12-07-2013, 11:51 AM
RE: Quit Smoking
Carlo, I'd never give up the wacky stuff. You know that! Lol.

I used the ecigs for a while, but they didn't really do much for me except for when I was driving. It helped get me through the first three weeks or so, then I stopped using the ecigs too.

If I had a "secret" I'd definitely share, but the truth is, I just decided to quit for good...so I did. My wife smoked the entire time (and she still does), but after the first two weeks her smoking actually helped. By the two week mark, her cigarettes smelled so bad to my returning sense of smell, that whenever she smoked it reinforced my desire to stay cigarette free.

It's easy to forget how much better you feel after quitting. I think that's one of the reasons why relapse is so common. Remind yourself every day how much healthier you are. How easy it is to breathe. How good things taste and smell. And always remember that quitting is an accomplishment that deserves congratulations EVERY DAY.

So whether you quit an hour ago, or a year ago.....CONGRATULATIONS!!!!

Just visiting.

-SR
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12-07-2013, 01:14 PM
RE: Quit Smoking
(12-07-2013 11:51 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Carlo, I'd never give up the wacky stuff. You know that! Lol.

I used the ecigs for a while, but they didn't really do much for me except for when I was driving. It helped get me through the first three weeks or so, then I stopped using the ecigs too.

If I had a "secret" I'd definitely share, but the truth is, I just decided to quit for good...so I did. My wife smoked the entire time (and she still does), but after the first two weeks her smoking actually helped. By the two week mark, her cigarettes smelled so bad to my returning sense of smell, that whenever she smoked it reinforced my desire to stay cigarette free.

It's easy to forget how much better you feel after quitting. I think that's one of the reasons why relapse is so common. Remind yourself every day how much healthier you are. How easy it is to breathe. How good things taste and smell. And always remember that quitting is an accomplishment that deserves congratulations EVERY DAY.

So whether you quit an hour ago, or a year ago.....CONGRATULATIONS!!!!

What type of ecig did you try? Makes a helluva difference. If it was one of those cigalikes that you can buy at supermarkets then I'm not surprised.

My main ecig is a Vamo with variable wattage and resistance with either a rebuildable atty or a carto tank. Then again I like my GLV Mini, real smart and feels great in the hand. For going out and about I use my Ego 650mah with a Mega Dual Coil Short Carto.

Also, flavours make a helluva difference. My faves are Shire Malt, Tobacco Haze, 666, Black Cat and Cigarillos.

What I'm saying is you can't just give up after just trying one type and one flavour. I have yet to meet someone who failed to get off the stinkies by using the right ecig setup and a flavour they like.
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