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13-10-2012, 07:30 AM
RE: Quotable Quotes
(11-10-2012 07:19 PM)Near Wrote:  
Ayaan Hirsi Ali Wrote:The only position that leaves me with no cognitive dissonance is atheism. It is not a creed. Death is certain, replacing both the siren-song of Paradise and the dread of Hell. Life on this earth, with all its mystery and beauty and pain, is then to be lived far more intensely: we stumble and get up, we are sad, confident, insecure, feel loneliness and joy and love. There is nothing more; but I want nothing more.

I stand corrected.

I put this in Hitch's quotes above. Source: http://blog.newhumanist.org.uk/2011/12/c...-2011.html

But sure enough, page 480 of the Portable Atheist... he is quoting AHA.

I'll remove it from the Hitch list.

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13-10-2012, 08:09 AM
RE: Quotable Quotes
Quotes from LK Washburn ...

Every kiss of love imprinted by a mother's lips on the face of her babe gives the lie to the Christian doctrine of total depravity, and every gift which the heart of pity lays in the hand of misfortune brands this doctrine as false and a libel on our human nature.

The truths which God revealed have been overthrown by the truths which man has discovered.

No man ever yet tore down his altar and found a God behind it.

No church has all the truth, and no school either. So-called religion merely shows where the search after truth ended. But truth is the infinite reality, and it will always be for man to find.

When a minister says that God will help you, ask him to put up the collateral.

It is a waste of words to talk about God and what he knows and what he does. No man knows that God does anything, that God knows anything, or that there is a God.

What a queer thing is Christian salvation! Believing in firemen will not save a burning house; believing in doctors will not make one well, but believing in a saviour saves men. Fudge!

Lots of men who would not associate with infidels for fear of contaminating their characters are not yet out of jail.

Where the cross has been planted only superstitions have grown.

But it is neither as God nor as a man that Jesus must be regarded, but as a myth. No such person ever lived either as a human or divine existence. He is simply a creature of fancy, the fruit of the imagination. He is a character of the brain, the creation of religious genius.

To build one house for man is better than to build a dozen houses to God.

It rains on the just and the unjust, but rarely just enough on either.

There is no authority that can be quoted against a man but the authority of some other man.

A man cannot be happy who believes in hell, any more than he can sweeten his coffee with a pickle.

No creed can be stretched to the size of truth; no church can be made as large as man.

If God exists, what objection can he have to saying so?

We are told that all things are possible with God, and yet God cannot boil an egg in cold water.

If the factory pays taxes and the church does not, it follows that the church will someday own the factory.

God cannot be put into the national Constitution without putting liberty out of it.

The cross everywhere is a dagger in the heart of liberty.

History shows that there is nothing so easy to enslave and nothing so hard to emancipate as ignorance, hence it becomes the double enemy of civilization. By its servility it is the prey of tyranny, and by its credulity it is the foe of enlightenment.

The more mystery is encouraged, the more deceit can impose upon the human mind.

An organization that requires the suppression of facts and the discouragement of knowledge in order to maintain its supremacy is the relic of a tyranny which our free age and our free thought are in duty bound to remove from the earth.

The churches erected in the name of God will ere long be tombstones to his, memory.

What has God revealed to man that has ever helped him get a living?

Take away every achievement of the world and leave man freedom, and the earth would again bloom with every glory of attainment; but take away liberty and everything useful and beautiful would vanish.

A miracle is not an explanation of what we cannot comprehend.

There is greater argument in one fact than in all the creeds.

The doubter is the safe man; the man who can be depended upon. He does not build upon a foundation of guesswork, and the structure he erects will stand. Let us not fear doubt, but rather fear to have falsehood passed for truth.

Too long has this world been at the feet of the priest. Man is never in that position for his own benefit, but for the benefit of the priest.

We should scorn the person who would be mean enough to allow his fellow-being to be punished for his deeds. Yet we have a religion in our midst that is founded on this kind of meanness.

It is plain enough that men and women care for God. This is too apparent to be disputed, unless men and women are hypocrites. What is not so plain is that God cares for men and women.

Prayer is a hook that never caught any fish. It is a gun that never brought down any game.

The feet of progress have always been shod by doubt.

No man ever got an answer to prayer that he could show to another person.

The character of God would stand vastly higher in human estimation if he had visited the garden in which he had placed the first human pair and picked up the serpent and cast him over the garden wall before he had a chance to tempt Eve, instead of waiting until the mischief was done, and then cursing the whole lot for what he might so easily have prevented.

If there were no ministers and no priests, how long would there be any churches?

Unless some people change their habits before they die, there will be a lot of dirty angels in the next world, if there is any next world.

It has been discovered that the man who was lost in thought was not a church member.

Religion is no more the parent of morality than an incubator is the mother of a chicken.

Hell is where cowards have sent heroes.

When the church teaches that confession is good for the soul, it teaches false doctrine; it is only good for the church.

If man had no knowledge except what he has got out of the Bible he would not know enough to make a shoe.

We could believe in God if he shortened the road for the lame, led the blind or fed the starving.

A great many people who worship Jesus would not let him come at the back door.

A person has not much excuse for living who can make no better use of life than passing it in a nunnery.

Prayer is like a pump in an empty well, it makes lots of noise, but brings no water.

Laying up treasures in heaven never kept a man out of the poor-house.

Blessings on the man who first dared to doubt.

Trying to find God is a good deal like looking for money one has lost in a dream.

The power that conquers men today must be the power of enlightened opinion.

If we do not need to worship God six days in the week why do we need to worship him on the seventh?

God's name is not considered good at the banks.

Our duty to the God of Christianity is to bury him.

The measure of liberty which man enjoys determines the civilization of the age in which he lives.

Priest and God have formed some of the worst combinations in history.

A higher respect for man has been one of the chief promoters of civilization.

The doctrine of salvation by faith is a libel on justice and has done more to undermine the virtue of the world than vice itself.

People who rely most on God rely least on themselves.

A dogma is the hand of the dead on the throat of the living.

We do not want holy books, but true ones; not sacred writings, but sensible writings.

A church that sets up a religious faith as more essential than purity, than kindness, charity or goodness, is a dangerous institution.

Most men would kill the truth if truth would kill their religion.

The original sin was not in eating of the forbidden fruit, but in planting the tree that bore the fruit.

The church is a bank that is continually receiving deposits but never pays a dividend.

When religion comes in at the door common sense goes out at the window.

Christianity is like a slow clock -- always being moved ahead.

If wisdom and diamonds grew on the same tree we could soon tell how much men loved wisdom.

Christianity is a black spot on the page of civilization.

We must condemn Christianity, not Christians; strike the church, but spare the heart.

The reason that revelation is always made to the simple is that the wise could not be imposed upon.

The person who can make a loaf of bread is more to the world than the person who could perform a miracle.

When Christian ministers stand up in their pulpits and say Let us pray, if they would sometimes vary the invitation and say: Let us laugh, they would do their congregations more good.

People used to think that to mix religion with business spoiled the religion, now they think it spoils the business.

The foolish and cruel notion that a wife is to obey her husband has sent more women to the grave than to the courts for a divorce.

The man who accepts the faith of Calvin is miserable in proportion to the extent he carries it out.

To depend upon God is like holding on to the tail-end of nothing.

God has done nothing for men and women except to scare them out of their wits.

Civilization has come about by going to school more than to church.

Whatever tends to prolong the existence of ignorance or to prevent the recognition of knowledge is dangerous to the well-being of the human race.

The true man walks the earth as the stars walk the heavens, grandly obedient to those laws which are implanted in his nature.

Priests will pardon thieves but not philosophers.

A theologian is a person who uses the word God to hide his ignorance.

Where are the sons of gods that loved the daughters of men?
Where are the nymphs, the goddesses of the winds and waters?
Where are the gnomes that lived inside the earth?
Where are the goblins that used to play tricks on mortals?
Where are the fairies that could blight or bless the human heart?
Where are the ghosts that haunted this globe?
Where are the witches that flew in and out of the homes of men?
Where is the devil that once roamed over the earth?
Where are they? Gone with the ignorance that believed in them.

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13-10-2012, 08:31 AM
RE: Quotable Quotes
(13-10-2012 07:30 AM)DLJ Wrote:  
(11-10-2012 07:19 PM)Near Wrote:  

I stand corrected.

I put this in Hitch's quotes above. Source: http://blog.newhumanist.org.uk/2011/12/c...-2011.html

But sure enough, page 480 of the Portable Atheist... he is quoting AHA.

I'll remove it from the Hitch list.

I always thought that it was his quote as well, it seems to have his style. Either way, it is one of my favourites. Smile



I found another part to the gunpowder vs. printers ink quote further on in "The Haunted Bookshop".

The Haunted Bookshop, by Christopher Morely Wrote:Printers ink has been running a race against gunpowder these many, many years. Ink is handicapped, in a way, because you can blow up a man with gunpowder in half a second, while it may take twenty years to blow him up with a book. But gunpowder destroys itself along with it's victim, while a book can keep on exploding for centuries.

The Haunted Bookshop, by Christopher Morely Wrote:It is only the very young who find satisfaction in lying abed in the morning. Those who approach the term of the fifth decade are sensitively aware of the fluency of life, and have no taste to squander it among the blankets.

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14-10-2012, 04:06 AM
RE: Quotable Quotes
Quotes from Douglas Adams:

There are some oddities in the perspective with which we see the world. The fact that we live at the bottom of a deep gravity well, on the surface of a gas covered planet going around a nuclear fireball 90 million miles away and think this to be normal is obviously some indication of how skewed our perspective tends to be, but we have done various things over intellectual history to slowly correct some of our misapprehensions.

The system of life on this planet is so astoundingly complex that it was a long time before man even realized that it was a system at all and that it wasn't something that was just there.

I am fascinated by religion (that's a completely different thing from believing in it!) It has had such an incalculably huge effect on human affairs. What is it? What does it represent? Why have we invented it? How does it keep going? What will become of it? I love to keep poking and prodding at it. I've thought about it so much over the years that that fascination is bound to spill over into my writing.

I'd take the awe of understanding over the awe of ignorance any day.

If you try and take a cat apart to see how it works, the first thing you have on your hands is a non-working cat.
Life is a level of complexity that almost lies outside our vision; it is so far beyond anything we have any means of understanding that we just think of it as a different class of object, a different class of matter; 'life', something that had a mysterious essence about it, was God given, and that's the only explanation we had.
The bombshell comes in 1859 when Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. It takes a long time before we really get to grips with this and begin to understand it, because not only does it seem incredible and thoroughly demeaning to us, but it's yet another shock to our system to discover that not only are we not the centre of the Universe and we're not made by anything, but we started out as some kind of slime and got to where we are via being a monkey. It just doesn't read well.


All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others.

The world is a thing of utter inordinate complexity and richness and strangeness that is absolutely awesome. I mean the idea that such complexity can arise not only out of such simplicity, but probably absolutely out of nothing, is the most fabulous extraordinary idea. And once you get some kind of inkling of how that might have happened, it's just wonderful. And … the opportunity to spend 70 or 80 years of your life in such a universe is time well spent as far as I am concerned.

A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that."

Let us think the unthinkable, let us do the undoable, let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all.

The door was the way to... to... The Door was The Way. Good. Capital letters were always the best way of dealing with things you didn't have a good answer to.

We don't have to save the world. The world is big enough to look after itself. What we have to be concerned about is whether or not the world we live in will be capable of sustaining us in it.

He attacked everything in life with a mix of extraordinary genius and naive incompetence, and it was often difficult to tell which was which.

Imagine a puddle waking up one morning and thinking, "This is an interesting world I find myself in — an interesting hole I find myself in — fits me rather neatly, doesn't it? In fact it fits me staggeringly well, must have been made to have me in it!"
This is such a powerful idea that as the sun rises in the sky and the air heats up and as, gradually, the puddle gets smaller and smaller, it's still frantically hanging on to the notion that everything's going to be alright, because this world was meant to have him in it, was built to have him in it; so the moment he disappears catches him rather by surprise.
I think this may be something we need to be on the watch out for. We all know that at some point in the future the Universe will come to an end and at some other point, considerably in advance from that but still not immediately pressing, the sun will explode. We feel there's plenty of time to worry about that, but on the other hand that's a very dangerous thing to say.


Part of how we come to take command of our world, to take command of our environment, to make these tools by which we're able to do this, is we ask ourselves questions about it the whole time. So this man starts to ask himself questions. "This world," he says, "so who made it?" Now, of course he thinks that, because he makes things himself.
So he's looking for someone who would have made this world. He says, "Well, so who would have made this world? Well, it must be something a little like me. Obviously much, much bigger… and necessarily invisible. Now why did he make it?" Now we always ask ourselves "why?" because we look for intention around us; because we always intend– we do something with intention. We boil an egg in order to eat it. So we look at the rocks, and we look at the trees, and we wonder what intention is here even though it doesn't have intention.

We are not an endangered species ourselves yet, but this is not for lack of trying.

He hoped and prayed that there wasn't an afterlife. Then he realized there was a contradiction involved here and merely hoped that there wasn't an afterlife.

This was the evening of the last day of Gordon Way's life ... The weather forecast hadn't mentioned that, of course, that wasn't the job of the weather forecast, but then his horoscope had been pretty misleading as well. It had mentioned an unusual amount of planetary activity in his sign and had urged him to differentiate between what he thought he wanted and what he actually needed, and suggested that he should tackle emotional or work problems with determination and complete honesty, but had inexplicably failed to mention that he would be dead before the day was out.

I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.

In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.

It is no coincidence that in no known language does the phrase 'As pretty as an Airport' appear.

There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.


Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.

He felt that his whole life was some kind of dream and he sometimes wondered whose it was and whether they were enjoying it.

Nothing travels faster than the speed of light with the possible exception of bad news, which obeys its own special laws.

The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.

Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.

Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty- five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it. Anything invented after you’re thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

Dennis Hutch had stepped up into the top seat when its founder had died of a lethal overdose of brick wall, taken while under the influence of a Ferrari and a bottle of tequila.

Gorillas are not yet sufficiently advanced in evolutionary terms to have discovered the benefits of passports, currency declaration forms, and official bribery, and tend to wander backwards and forwards across the border as and when their beastly, primitive whim takes them.

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14-10-2012, 04:09 AM
RE: Quotable Quotes
Quotes from Douglas Adams:

There are some oddities in the perspective with which we see the world. The fact that we live at the bottom of a deep gravity well, on the surface of a gas covered planet going around a nuclear fireball 90 million miles away and think this to be normal is obviously some indication of how skewed our perspective tends to be, but we have done various things over intellectual history to slowly correct some of our misapprehensions.

The system of life on this planet is so astoundingly complex that it was a long time before man even realized that it was a system at all and that it wasn't something that was just there.

I am fascinated by religion (that's a completely different thing from believing in it!) It has had such an incalculably huge effect on human affairs. What is it? What does it represent? Why have we invented it? How does it keep going? What will become of it? I love to keep poking and prodding at it. I've thought about it so much over the years that that fascination is bound to spill over into my writing.

I'd take the awe of understanding over the awe of ignorance any day.

If you try and take a cat apart to see how it works, the first thing you have on your hands is a non-working cat.
Life is a level of complexity that almost lies outside our vision; it is so far beyond anything we have any means of understanding that we just think of it as a different class of object, a different class of matter; 'life', something that had a mysterious essence about it, was God given, and that's the only explanation we had.
The bombshell comes in 1859 when Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. It takes a long time before we really get to grips with this and begin to understand it, because not only does it seem incredible and thoroughly demeaning to us, but it's yet another shock to our system to discover that not only are we not the centre of the Universe and we're not made by anything, but we started out as some kind of slime and got to where we are via being a monkey. It just doesn't read well.


All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others.

The world is a thing of utter inordinate complexity and richness and strangeness that is absolutely awesome. I mean the idea that such complexity can arise not only out of such simplicity, but probably absolutely out of nothing, is the most fabulous extraordinary idea. And once you get some kind of inkling of how that might have happened, it's just wonderful. And … the opportunity to spend 70 or 80 years of your life in such a universe is time well spent as far as I am concerned.

A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that."

Let us think the unthinkable, let us do the undoable, let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all.

The door was the way to... to... The Door was The Way. Good. Capital letters were always the best way of dealing with things you didn't have a good answer to.

We don't have to save the world. The world is big enough to look after itself. What we have to be concerned about is whether or not the world we live in will be capable of sustaining us in it.

He attacked everything in life with a mix of extraordinary genius and naive incompetence, and it was often difficult to tell which was which.

Imagine a puddle waking up one morning and thinking, "This is an interesting world I find myself in — an interesting hole I find myself in — fits me rather neatly, doesn't it? In fact it fits me staggeringly well, must have been made to have me in it!"
This is such a powerful idea that as the sun rises in the sky and the air heats up and as, gradually, the puddle gets smaller and smaller, it's still frantically hanging on to the notion that everything's going to be alright, because this world was meant to have him in it, was built to have him in it; so the moment he disappears catches him rather by surprise.
I think this may be something we need to be on the watch out for. We all know that at some point in the future the Universe will come to an end and at some other point, considerably in advance from that but still not immediately pressing, the sun will explode. We feel there's plenty of time to worry about that, but on the other hand that's a very dangerous thing to say.


Part of how we come to take command of our world, to take command of our environment, to make these tools by which we're able to do this, is we ask ourselves questions about it the whole time. So this man starts to ask himself questions. "This world," he says, "so who made it?" Now, of course he thinks that, because he makes things himself.
So he's looking for someone who would have made this world. He says, "Well, so who would have made this world? Well, it must be something a little like me. Obviously much, much bigger… and necessarily invisible. Now why did he make it?" Now we always ask ourselves "why?" because we look for intention around us; because we always intend– we do something with intention. We boil an egg in order to eat it. So we look at the rocks, and we look at the trees, and we wonder what intention is here even though it doesn't have intention.

We are not an endangered species ourselves yet, but this is not for lack of trying.

He hoped and prayed that there wasn't an afterlife. Then he realized there was a contradiction involved here and merely hoped that there wasn't an afterlife.

This was the evening of the last day of Gordon Way's life ... The weather forecast hadn't mentioned that, of course, that wasn't the job of the weather forecast, but then his horoscope had been pretty misleading as well. It had mentioned an unusual amount of planetary activity in his sign and had urged him to differentiate between what he thought he wanted and what he actually needed, and suggested that he should tackle emotional or work problems with determination and complete honesty, but had inexplicably failed to mention that he would be dead before the day was out.

I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.

In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.

It is no coincidence that in no known language does the phrase 'As pretty as an Airport' appear.

There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.


Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.

He felt that his whole life was some kind of dream and he sometimes wondered whose it was and whether they were enjoying it.

Nothing travels faster than the speed of light with the possible exception of bad news, which obeys its own special laws.

The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.

Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.

Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty- five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it. Anything invented after you’re thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

Dennis Hutch had stepped up into the top seat when its founder had died of a lethal overdose of brick wall, taken while under the influence of a Ferrari and a bottle of tequila.

Gorillas are not yet sufficiently advanced in evolutionary terms to have discovered the benefits of passports, currency declaration forms, and official bribery, and tend to wander backwards and forwards across the border as and when their beastly, primitive whim takes them.

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