RE:tips to quit smoking
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27-07-2010, 04:01 AM
 
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
Well there is also some of the tips that are not mentioned here. I just want to mentioned some of them and just want to say that you have to Keep a picture of your family or someone very important to you with you at all times. And the another thing that I also want to say that whenever you have a craving for a cigarette, instead of lighting up, write down your feelings or whatever is on your mind.
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15-09-2010, 03:52 AM
 
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
I have read this all of the stuff and I just would like to say you that its really that much nice thread so that every one can get the proper idea about that. The more thing that I want to say that Smoking cessation throws our bodies into shock initially.
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15-09-2010, 04:24 AM
 
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
I began smoking cigarettes when I was 13 because I thought it was cool and an adult thing to do, because my mother smoked (my father did not). I forced myself to smoke, despite my body's initial protests over inhaling smoke. Of course, once your body is addicted to nicotine, and it doesn't take long, the protests go away.

With time, it became evident to me that smoking was not good for my health ... I didn't need research to conclude this ... I could feel it. But nicotine is very addictive. I continued until I was in college, where I quit for a year, but all it took was one cigarette and I was back smoking 2 packs a day again in a week!

I finally quit in graduate school, after my time in the Army (where cigarettes were cheap). I realized that the last thing I did each night was smoke a cigarette. And the first thing I did in the morning was smoke a cigarette. It was everything I could do to sleep through the night without a cigarette - I had lost control over the habit and this finally became clear. Once I truly made up my mind, I found I could get through that first week or two "cold turkey", and after that the cravings went away, never to return. Unless you've truly made up your mind to quit, nothing will work. Even then, the physical addiction can be too much for some people, who may need all sorts of "aids" to quitting.

Everyone who has ever quit cigarettes (and most smokers want to, but not badly enough), has quit more than once. If you quit, and then fall back in the habit, don't give up!! Keep trying. You can do it!!
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15-09-2010, 07:03 AM
 
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
This is reposted from my blog. Just thought I would share my smoking story.

A little background will let you know that I smoked for nearly (or about) fourteen years. I started in high school and brought it with me to the Army. The Army reinforced it for me, as a great number of Soldiers smoke. It might be one of the last places where it is socially acceptable. It’s actually expected. People will ask you to go smoke with them to continue the conversation. Most of us work outdoors anyway, so it’s easy. There aren’t any stairs to walk down or any doors to choke up with smoke. It just works.

So I tried (unsuccessfully) to quit many times. I tried at Fort Drum, and just couldn’t do it. Friends would give me advice.

I would give them advice back.

Quote:Them: “you should chew on pens instead”

Them: “you should try electronic cigarettes”

Them: “you should try sugar-free candy so you don’t gain weight while you quit”

Me: “do you smoke?”

Them: “no.”

Me: “then you should SHUT THE FUCK UP.”

Quitting just didn’t seem to work for me. I got irritable and ate more. Then I deployed to Afghanistan for the third time. Well, my smoking increased. Brenda and I were trying to have kids when I got back, and nicotine inhibits fertility on the male side. I wanted to save money and buy a motorcycle. My friends were pressuring me to quit, and so was my family. So I resolved to just up and do it. I went to smoking cessation class.

I went to the doctor, and I got put on Wellbutrin. I didn’t want a cigarette anymore, but I was always hungry. And the dreams were terrible. I couldn’t sleep, and so I ate to stay awake. And I was irritable because I couldn’t sleep. I slipped into a mild depression for months. Finally, when I left Afghanistan, I quit Wellbutrin too.

I became one of the people who I hated. I wanted to preach at my friends and give them advice on how I quit. Even if they enjoyed their smoking. Because I had used the drugs to quit, once I was off them I immediately wanted a cigarette again. I was still chemically dependent and working a high stress job. All my friends smoked. It was all I smelled all day. The smell of a cigarette, or the sound of a lighter would cause my mouth to water in anticipation. It was all very Pavlovian.

Really, it was merely a matter of time before I started smoking again. Brenda and I PCS’d to Fort Irwin, and I was having serious trouble adjusting to being back in the States. I didn’t necessarily have PTSD (this third trip to Afghanistan had been easiest), but I was showing hallmark symptoms.

Trouble sleeping, anxiety, I was snappish and irritable all the time. I shied away from crowds and anyone who “couldn’t relate”. Combine all that with the fact that I was yearning for a cigarette every day and it became inevitable that I start again.

I took over a training room at Fort Irwin as well. For those of you not in the know, a training room is an office at the unit level that serves as a clearing house for all administrative and legal and financial actions in and out of the unit.

It’s a very demanding job that requires a certain skill set. You have to be able to work under pressure and work very long hours. Everything that comes out has to be perfect, or it has to be done over. This is people’s careers that you are touching with every piece of paper you push. It was 12-14 hour days doing everything for everyone.

I snapped. I screamed at people, I became a monster to be around at work. I was feinding for a cigarette. Finally, I broke down and bummed one from a fellow NCO. It was like a wave of calm washed over me. I had nothing but kind words for everyone. I had fed the proverbial monkey. But in sating the monkey, I had opened up the floodgates to my own feelings of guilt. I sneaked cigarettes at work and couldn’t smoke in the car because I didn’t want to let Brenda down. I was great at work, but a wreck at home. My situation had reversed.

After about a month of this, I came clean and confessed to Brenda. I had been worried about what she would say. Secretly, I thought she might leave me for being weak. I should have known better. She was disappointed, but supportive and understanding. I love her for that.

As my work life settled down, my First Sergeant (the senior NCO in a Troop, Battery or Company) told me he was sending me to the board.

I refused.

I didn’t want to get promoted. I merely wanted to ride out the rest of my time as a Sergeant and get out. I was done (I still am, I’m only a few months from ETS). Unfortunately, he didn’t agree, as I had a couple of years left in the Army. He was looking out for my career, whether I wanted him to or not. So he counseled me in writing, and ordered me to attend the next NCO of the month board. That is where they send people to get some board experience before they go up for promotion.

Funny thing, that.

I won. I didn’t even study at first. I have one of those types of minds, where I can remember things and reference and cross-reference to see the relationship between them. And I retain it. Then the two people before me had to leave. And I beat the remaining guy.

The thing is, when you win, the next board becomes your place of duty. Now instead of the First Sergeant telling me to attend a board, I had the Command Sergeant Major (my First Sergeant’s boss) telling me to represent Him at the NEXT board. I planned to blow it, but try just hard enough not to make it obvious. I would avoid studying, and just let someone else “take it”.

As this all started, I started up smoking cessation class again. I wanted to be done. I felt guilty, and I wasn’t enjoying the cigarettes. It was an automatic thing for me. I was smoking without realizing I had just smoked. I was disgusted with myself. I sat through class after class before they gave me Chantix (instead of Wellbutrin) to quit.

I went from Squadron NCO of the Month to Squadron NCO of the Quarter. From there I became the Regimental NCO of the Quarter. After winning that, I went to Regimental NCO of the Year. Then on to Post NCO of the Quarter, where they revealed that this was going to serve double as my promotion board…the board I had been trying to avoid. Well, I won Post NCO of the Quarter, and there was a dinner. They gave me a gold watch and savings bonds and gift cards. NOW, I started to study. The next board was Fort Irwin NCO of the Year, and then on to FORSCOM and then the Army Board if I won those.

Those are big boards, and I couldn’t just slide through and try to fail quietly. So, in preparing for the Fort Irwin NCO of the Year board, it was revealed that a requirement for the board was being Combatives Level 1 qualified. I wasn’t. Rather than letting me bow out, like I had asked to, they sent SSG Robinson to teach me combatives, and then I would get my certificate by completing the final combatives test, where you get punched in the face until you secure a grapple on him. Four TIMES. The day of the clench drill, I took my first Chantix.

I learned combatives with SSG Robinson, and then demonstrated what I had learned to SFC Luna, Fort Irwin’s Combatives instructor. He pronounced me ready for the “clench drill” as it’s called and I went on with the graduating class. The guy doing the punch drill was a former Golden Gloves boxer. I went through the first time and got knocked the hell down a couple of times. I got back up, and secured the “clench”.

After a moment’s break, I formulated a plan. I knew the score, I was going to sidestep him as he swung and secure the clench from the rear. That ought to be easy enough.

Well, apparently he’d seen that before. Who would have guessed, huh?

As I stepped to the side, he stepped with me, but his foot landed on the instep of mine, rolling mine under his. And he outweighed me by a good hundred pounds. I hit the ground and felt my ankle grind. He continued to hit me until I got up and couldn’t stand on both feet.

Once he realized that something was actually wrong, I got to leave for a minute. I went outside and got some fresh air, walking it off. I had to pass though. I went back in and I finished the last three clenches on a broken ankle. I didn’t know it was broken at the time, but I suspected. It swelled pretty badly.

After the clenches were done, before I even went to the hospital, I went outside and lit a cigarette on instinct.

Nothing. No pleasure, no enjoyment, no taste, just nothing.

I never took another pill, and I never smoked another cigarette until I was in Korea.

I had one a few months ago, at a party. And again…Nothing.

I have no desire to smoke. I can hang around smokers all day, and it doesn’t bother me. I credit my ankle breaking on the first day I took that pill. Something between the pill and the pain flipped a switch in my head and finally allowed me to quit.

I think that the key is you have to want to be done. In Afghanistan, I had let Brenda and people I knew pressure me into quitting. I was doing it to increase the likelihood of conception and to save money. But I still wanted to smoke.

The second time, at Fort Irwin, I was tired of the way I felt about myself. Brenda didn’t pressure me to quit, I just was ready to do it for me. And with the exception of the one here in Korea, I have been smoke free for almost three years.
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15-09-2010, 08:03 PM
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
E-cigarette does have nicotine, that's what's in those drops you put in it. It just doesnt have any of the other weird chemicals that cigarettes have in them.
Nicotine is a vaso-constrictor.
That said, I quit smoking in 1982 when I was 20 years old. I had smoked off and on since I was 15, mostly on. Back then there weren't any patches, pills, lozenges, or gum. It was either do it, or don't.
What I did was this: When I got up in the morning I MADE myself drink my first cup of coffee without a cigarette. (so hard!) Then, when I thought I was going to rip my skin right off, I would light up, but only smoke maybe 1/2 the cigarette or less--just enough to get the craving off. Then, I would take the cigarette, carefully butt it out and put it back in the pack or on the ashtray. Then I would take the pack and ashtray and put it up in a cupboard out of sight (out of mind?!) I would then proceed to get busy with my day, doing whatever I needed to do and make myself go as LONG as I could without a cigarette. And again, when I thought I was going to absolutely rip my hair out or my skin off, I would take the OLD nasty butted-out cigarette and light it up. Repeat. By about the 3rd day, I could go pretty long without taking the first drag of the day and when I did it made me dizzy and sick. By the end of the first week I pretty much had it licked. The worst part was when I was drinking with my friends. But, i made it thru.
Since then I have only picked it up once, after I divorced my first husband, and that was more of a "weekend warrior" type thing, going to clubs and whatnot. It didnt' last long because by that time I was a hardcore runner and it interferred with my running.
If you really really want to, you can do it. It's like anything, you just have to be strong.
And pray to God to help you.....HAHAHAHAHAHAHA JUST KIDDING!!!!! (hadja there for a minute, didn't I?)
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16-09-2010, 12:08 AM
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
Acupuncture. The first treatment didn't work so I got a second treatment the next day. That reduced the cravings a lot. Three days after that I went for a third treatment. This one reduced the cravings to almost nothing. To back it up I used a visualization method that I thought up. Every time I saw a cigarette being lit up I imagined myself licking a used ashtray.
After I while I would gag when I saw someone smoking or lighting up.

I am always amazed when someone tells me acupuncture doesn't help you quit smoking. I had tried cold turkey a few times. The acupuncture was very different and made Quitting a huge amount easier. My uncle tried acupuncture. I gave him the exact same instructions you from my story above. He went for the first treatment and like mine it didn't do anything. He didn't return for a second treatment like I told him to. He said it didn't work. He didn't listen. He still smokes. His choice. He didn't make up his mind to quit and he didn't follow up on what worked for me. His loss.
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16-09-2010, 02:31 AM
 
RE: tips to quit smoking
(16-09-2010 12:08 AM)No J. Wrote:  Acupuncture. The first treatment didn't work so I got a second treatment the next day. That reduced the cravings a lot. Three days after that I went for a third treatment. This one reduced the cravings to almost nothing. To back it up I used a visualization method that I thought up. Every time I saw a cigarette being lit up I imagined myself licking a used ashtray.
After I while I would gag when I saw someone smoking or lighting up.

I am always amazed when someone tells me acupuncture doesn't help you quit smoking. I had tried cold turkey a few times. The acupuncture was very different and made Quitting a huge amount easier. My uncle tried acupuncture. I gave him the exact same instructions you from my story above. He went for the first treatment and like mine it didn't do anything. He didn't return for a second treatment like I told him to. He said it didn't work. He didn't listen. He still smokes. His choice. He didn't make up his mind to quit and he didn't follow up on what worked for me. His loss.

One of the techniques that the doctor told us to try in the military (and this would work for anyone carrying a backpack) was to carry a water bottle with about 1/2 cup of water in it. Then, when you are done with your cigarette, put it in the bottle to extingiush it. Keep using the same bottle until you can't put too many more butts in it. Put just enough water in it to where the butts can't absorb any more liquid.

Then set it in the sun for a day or two. From then on, every time you want a cigarette, take a whiff of the bottle instead. It supposedly helped a couple people in my unit quit. And, best of all, it's relatively free (especially compared to gums and lozenges).
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03-10-2010, 03:33 AM
 
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
Those are really great tips to follow but do you think if most individual are addicted to smoking they would really quite? As for me, I've been a chain smoker before and tried many strategies and tips on quitting but I could say it is tough doing all alone. I've been with Turning Winds Institution that guides and help me to overcome my addiction and an initiator to give me a wake up call on stop smoking.

Seek help and it will give you great result as well.
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30-11-2010, 03:01 AM
 
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
Excellent tips given by you in order to quit the smoking. I hope people will implement these tips and will quit smoking.
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01-12-2010, 01:25 AM
RE: RE:tips to quit smoking
The only ones who will are those who want to quit smoking. Many people say they want to quit, because that is what they believe that they are supposed to want, but they really don't want to quit. They are just saying they do for other reasons.
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