Raising free thinking children with religious family
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17-03-2012, 09:15 AM
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
After reading the posts on this topic I've come to realize that even the atheists that were once religious still have no problem with having a choice of believing in lies. We fight, argue, discredit lies constantly. If you allow your children the opportunity to believe in lies and don't inform them of the reality of things you might as well be promoting misinformation.

I understand the need for learning something on your own, but providing the facts when you know the children are misled is a must. I do not sympathize with religious beliefs. I refuse to enable a crutch in life when I have to stand on my own two feet.

The moment you say you allow your children to have a choice to be religious or not is the moment you fail them. Imagine the next time you are arguing with some delusional freak on the net and put the image of your child in the place of that freak. That's what your child could be doing one day if you give them the choice to promote lies and falsities. I can only provide the correct way and if at some point my children choose the wrong path, I can only hope I provided enough tools to keep them steady and I will continue to give facts along the way.

Remember, they won't always ask the questions you would ask. They will hear that an invisible sky daddy is watching over them and they are perfectly safe and believe it at some point. Why would they ask the question if everyone around them is telling them it is so. You have to be perceptive and aware of the hoards of information that is attacking your child's mind. Think about that one time you didn't ask the question and just assumed, later find out you were wrong and wondered why know one told you before hand.

I will bet you tell your child that they need good grades in school. Why aren't you giving them a choice of having bad grades or good grades? It's obvious why; because you know they won't always make the correct choices in life and you know you have to provide them with the correct path and fight to keep them on it. It is a long road to giving up religious empathy but that day will come. Especially as we start to have more Atheists not having to have been freed from religion.

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17-03-2012, 09:32 AM
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
(17-03-2012 09:15 AM)Clint Barnett Wrote:  After reading the posts on this topic I've come to realize that even the atheists that were once religious still have no problem with having a choice of believing in lies. We fight, argue, discredit lies constantly. If you allow your children the opportunity to believe in lies and don't inform them of the reality of things you might as well be promoting misinformation.

I understand the need for learning something on your own, but providing the facts when you know the children are misled is a must. I do not sympathize with religious beliefs. I refuse to enable a crutch in life when I have to stand on my own two feet.

The moment you say you allow your children to have a choice to be religious or not is the moment you fail them. Imagine the next time you are arguing with some delusional freak on the net and put the image of your child in the place of that freak. That's what your child could be doing one day if you give them the choice to promote lies and falsities. I can only provide the correct way and if at some point my children choose the wrong path, I can only hope I provided enough tools to keep them steady and I will continue to give facts along the way.

Remember, they won't always ask the questions you would ask. They will hear that an invisible sky daddy is watching over them and they are perfectly safe and believe it at some point. Why would they ask the question if everyone around them is telling them it is so. You have to be perceptive and aware of the hoards of information that is attacking your child's mind. Think about that one time you didn't ask the question and just assumed, later find out you were wrong and wondered why know one told you before hand.

I will bet you tell your child that they need good grades in school. Why aren't you giving them a choice of having bad grades or good grades? It's obvious why; because you know they won't always make the correct choices in life and you know you have to provide them with the correct path and fight to keep them on it. It is a long road to giving up religious empathy but that day will come. Especially as we start to have more Atheists not having to have been freed from religion.

I think your realization is correct, although I'm rather biased on this so I can't say my confirmation isn't prejudiced... but let's at least assume it's true in my case because it is.

You're making two mistaken assumptions here... one is that the theists are absolutely wrong. I agree that current evidence is on our side, which is why I'm "on our side" of atheism. But it doesn't mean that theism can't be correct.

But even if theism were absolutely untrue, the more important problem is assumption number two: that we should dictate what our children believe, even if they want to believe in false things. Are you that much of a dictator that you want to control your child's thoughts, too?

I understand that we have a responsibility to educate our children, but there's still a line that we shouldn't cross. I will not misinform or miseducate my child, but if she wants to believe in lies, it's not within my rights to tell her that she's not allowed to do that. My parents don't control my thoughts, and because they're Christians, it's rather a good thing that they don't. I believe that children should be allowed to disagree with their parents. This may lead them to stupid or false beliefs, but as a human I recognize that I'm not perfect, and so they may be right while I'm wrong. It's just a fact I have to live with.

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17-03-2012, 09:56 AM
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
(17-03-2012 09:32 AM)Starcrash Wrote:  
(17-03-2012 09:15 AM)Clint Barnett Wrote:  After reading the posts on this topic I've come to realize that even the atheists that were once religious still have no problem with having a choice of believing in lies. We fight, argue, discredit lies constantly. If you allow your children the opportunity to believe in lies and don't inform them of the reality of things you might as well be promoting misinformation.

I understand the need for learning something on your own, but providing the facts when you know the children are misled is a must. I do not sympathize with religious beliefs. I refuse to enable a crutch in life when I have to stand on my own two feet.

The moment you say you allow your children to have a choice to be religious or not is the moment you fail them. Imagine the next time you are arguing with some delusional freak on the net and put the image of your child in the place of that freak. That's what your child could be doing one day if you give them the choice to promote lies and falsities. I can only provide the correct way and if at some point my children choose the wrong path, I can only hope I provided enough tools to keep them steady and I will continue to give facts along the way.

Remember, they won't always ask the questions you would ask. They will hear that an invisible sky daddy is watching over them and they are perfectly safe and believe it at some point. Why would they ask the question if everyone around them is telling them it is so. You have to be perceptive and aware of the hoards of information that is attacking your child's mind. Think about that one time you didn't ask the question and just assumed, later find out you were wrong and wondered why know one told you before hand.

I will bet you tell your child that they need good grades in school. Why aren't you giving them a choice of having bad grades or good grades? It's obvious why; because you know they won't always make the correct choices in life and you know you have to provide them with the correct path and fight to keep them on it. It is a long road to giving up religious empathy but that day will come. Especially as we start to have more Atheists not having to have been freed from religion.

I think your realization is correct, although I'm rather biased on this so I can't say my confirmation isn't prejudiced... but let's at least assume it's true in my case because it is.

You're making two mistaken assumptions here... one is that the theists are absolutely wrong. I agree that current evidence is on our side, which is why I'm "on our side" of atheism. But it doesn't mean that theism can't be correct.

But even if theism were absolutely untrue, the more important problem is assumption number two: that we should dictate what our children believe, even if they want to believe in false things. Are you that much of a dictator that you want to control your child's thoughts, too?

I understand that we have a responsibility to educate our children, but there's still a line that we shouldn't cross. I will not misinform or miseducate my child, but if she wants to believe in lies, it's not within my rights to tell her that she's not allowed to do that. My parents don't control my thoughts, and because they're Christians, it's rather a good thing that they don't. I believe that children should be allowed to disagree with their parents. This may lead them to stupid or false beliefs, but as a human I recognize that I'm not perfect, and so they may be right while I'm wrong. It's just a fact I have to live with.

I would never assume I could control my childrens thoughts. That would make me have some sort of supernatural mind control Tongue

I may have worded things that could lead to misinterpretation (what can I say I read the bible too much). I'll try to give an example.

When I was in the army as a Paratrooper we started out with training and they would always show us the wrong way and then the right way. It wasn't until later that they realized that showing us the wrong way was really a bad idea. It would train you to think improperly. They eventually changed the entire training to only show you the right way. Knowing that if you knew the right way, that is the way you would go with it.

As far as your comment about my "assumptions" about the theist's being mistaken. You can say that I am mistaken, doesn't make it true it only makes that your opinion. I can only tell you that I'm a strong atheist and no evidence has been provided to lead me to believe otherwise. Then again, I'm very straight forward about who and what I am. As far as the dictator comment. Some things in life are dictated to us and we allow it. Keeping lies and misinformation out of the realm of truth is probably a good thing to be dictated note the key word here? Probably.

Everything dictated would need a set of checks and balances if you want to go the "I'm worried about the outcome" route. You make assumptions about my comments but it is completely understandable considering you have never met me and you don't truly know who I am. I understand the misinterpretation due to no facial expressions, no body language, and no tone of voice to follow. But know that I do not control my children with an iron fist. I do insure they are aware of the facts and I do not allow bullshit lies to have any grounds in reality. (and they do talk back a lot Tongue )

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17-03-2012, 10:18 AM
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
(17-03-2012 09:15 AM)Clint Barnett Wrote:  After reading the posts on this topic I've come to realize that even the atheists that were once religious still have no problem with having a choice of believing in lies. We fight, argue, discredit lies constantly. If you allow your children the opportunity to believe in lies and don't inform them of the reality of things you might as well be promoting misinformation.

I understand the need for learning something on your own, but providing the facts when you know the children are misled is a must. I do not sympathize with religious beliefs. I refuse to enable a crutch in life when I have to stand on my own two feet.

The moment you say you allow your children to have a choice to be religious or not is the moment you fail them. Imagine the next time you are arguing with some delusional freak on the net and put the image of your child in the place of that freak. That's what your child could be doing one day if you give them the choice to promote lies and falsities. I can only provide the correct way and if at some point my children choose the wrong path, I can only hope I provided enough tools to keep them steady and I will continue to give facts along the way.

Remember, they won't always ask the questions you would ask. They will hear that an invisible sky daddy is watching over them and they are perfectly safe and believe it at some point. Why would they ask the question if everyone around them is telling them it is so. You have to be perceptive and aware of the hoards of information that is attacking your child's mind. Think about that one time you didn't ask the question and just assumed, later find out you were wrong and wondered why know one told you before hand.

I will bet you tell your child that they need good grades in school. Why aren't you giving them a choice of having bad grades or good grades? It's obvious why; because you know they won't always make the correct choices in life and you know you have to provide them with the correct path and fight to keep them on it. It is a long road to giving up religious empathy but that day will come. Especially as we start to have more Atheists not having to have been freed from religion.

This totally depends on the nature of the child, really.

I know, if my parents had pushed atheism, being the rebel I was I would have embraced religion for much longer. As is, they didn't influence me in the least and I grew out of it at age ten, when I filed away all my fairy tale books and my dolls.

They let me explore, let me go to church and even study to become a nun. (the catholics like to start 'em early, lol).

But they always encouraged me to think and dad, being an engineer, often went through lengths to explain to me how things worked, at a very early age. He was great at reducing things to their essence, and I was able to understand concepts early because of that.

So I was raised with no restrictions re. religion, but with an analytical mind. Religion was never a topic of conversation at home at all. It was no big deal and both my parents just ignored it. They never told me they were atheists, they just didn't go to church and didn't ever mention god.

They loved questions, they answered everything no matter how stupid or provocative it may have been, and if they didn't know the answer they got the encyclopedia and read it to me and explained what it meant.

And bingo, I figured it all out for myself.

So, I believe in knowledge. If a lot of religious stuff comes their way, just make sure it's balanced by knowledge of how things really work. Lay a foundation for understanding the world in a rational manner. Explain - the universe, evolution, everything. What a cog is, what perpetual motion is, any and everything can be tailored so a 4 or 5 year old can grasp it. Wait til they ask a question, or do it when you know they have heard some religious BS.

The more of a big deal you make out of religion, the more of a big deal it is. Knowledge and free thought are the big deal you need to encourage.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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17-03-2012, 11:33 AM
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
(16-03-2012 01:56 AM)Egor Wrote:  
(08-03-2012 03:10 PM)JLMomma Wrote:  After growing up in a devoutly religious family and being heavily indoctrinated in Christianity I want my children to be able to make their own choice.

How's a five-year-old going to do that? And if they grow up without religious instruction, how are they going to be free to make any choice beyond agnosticisim?

That has to be one of the dumbest arguments I've heard. One should not indoctrinate a kid in a religion, for one. They are free to make whatever choice they want when older, but indoctrinating them in a religion makes that choice for them in favor of whatever religion it is you choose. I see it like this: you're at a buffet with steak, hamburgers, mac & cheese, etc. You're saying you should fill your kid's plate with only mac & cheese so that they are free to make any choice beyond not eating. How can you not see that that's retarded?

(16-03-2012 01:56 AM)Egor Wrote:  
Quote:I'm finding though that my relatives are pushing their own beliefs.

One night, my 5 yr old started telling me about Jesus loving her and how when she does bad things it makes him sad and that she has to pray to say sorry to him. She is a very advanced reader soon after this little bed time revelation she started reading a children's bible that was a gift from a family member.

Yeah, you should change that behavior right away.

Quote:I'm upset because I don't want her thinking there's some imaginary being is watching her or that she owes this being anything much less an apology. I was so scared of hell and demons when I was growing up. I don't want my kids to think that anything like that is even remotely real.

So can't you just let her believe in Jesus? Why do you have to rip that away from her?

So can't you just let her believe in Xenu? Allah? Her family's delusion of choice shouldn't be thrust upon her kid. If they're old enough to understand, that's one thing. At 5, kids believe everything their parents and authority figures tell them (for the most part lol). For one, the Jesus character in the Bible is a douche.

Jebus Wrote:And the disciples having come near, said to him, `Wherefore in similes dost thou speak to them?' And he answering said to them that -- `To you it hath been given to know the secrets of the reign of the heavens, and to these it hath not been given, for whoever hath, it shall be given to him, and he shall have overabundance, and whoever hath not, even that which he hath shall be taken from him. Because of this, in similes do I speak to them, because seeing they do not see, and hearing they do not hear, nor understand, and fulfilled on them is the prophecy of Isaiah, that saith, With hearing ye shall hear, and ye shall not understand, and seeing ye shall see, and ye shall not perceive, for made gross was the heart of this people, and with the ears they heard heavily, and their eyes they did close, lest they might see with the eyes, and with the ears might hear, and with the heart understand, and turn back, and I might heal them.

In other words, He chose to speak in confusing terms in order to fulfill a prophecy (self-fulfilling prophecy ftw) and so that "they" wouldn't understand, so he wouldn't have to accept them and heal them. Basically, "Screw you guys, I only want to help these other guys". Add to that the other parts where he's said he came to bring the sword, that families will divide themselves, to abandon their families and follow him, and where he instructed people to "let the dead bury the dead" and follow him. The Jesus character only preaches some basic moralities, but throws in a lot of guilt and superstition as well. None (or very little) of the things he said were original. The golden rule predates Christianity, and that's the most positive thing I can recall him saying.

(16-03-2012 01:56 AM)Egor Wrote:  
Quote:I feel like the whole Jesus topic is not even age appropriate for her. I wouldn't let her watch a show as scary and violent as the jesus story so why if it's someone religion is it appropriate?

2000 years of passion plays and suddenly they're not appropriate for children. Imagine that.

The Bible contains a lot of violence and sexuality that would bring up questions in a kid's mind that they aren't ready for, if they even understand what's going on.

(16-03-2012 01:56 AM)Egor Wrote:  
Quote:I feel like I'm being forced to bias her because other people can't mind their own business and have to push their beliefs on my child. It's so overbearing to teach my child something they know I don't believe. It's ridiculous.

But you still want them to babysit, right? I mean for as terrible as it all is that your daughter recognizes fault in herself and wants to be better in the future, we don't want Grandma to stop watching her.

Quote:So far I've been countering this by reading through the children's bible with her and discussing the stories. Pointing out obvious things like in the creation story when god separated the light from the darkness two days before he made the sun. I asked her where she thought the light came from before there was sun or stars.


Wait...I got this one...I think I know what she said, now I'm going out on a limb here: "I don't know, Mommy."

Quote:I don't know how to approach my mother about this. It may not have been her to talk to her but either way she slips things into conversation all of the time and it really bothers me. I need to tell talk to her about it soon. Religion has always been a touchy subject between us and though I value our relationship it's very fragile. I don't want to jeopardize it because I've spent so long trying to rebuild it.

So step aside. If you have no faith, then step aside and let your mother handle that part. She'd probably be glad to. All you have to do is nothing. Or maybe you could fake it if your kid wants you to read the Bible to her.

I'll tell you something: You think the the light and sun question was hard. Just wait until she's 13 and screaming "Why the hell should I listen to you!" You'll wish you hadn't made her an atheist then.

So, she should give up and let her mother raise her kid, because she doesn't have faith. The church thrives on indoctrinating kids when they're young, then keeping it going by villainizing those that don't believe and making people feel guilty if they so much as question anything. She shouldn't let her kid succumb to this garbage, it's her kid and she has the right to raise her kid in the way she feels is best. Letting her kid make up her own mind, rather than being indoctrinated at 5, is a much better approach. If Christianity had any truth to it, there would be no reason to be afraid that someone wouldn't choose to believe it without being indoctrinated from when they were young. [/quote]

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17-03-2012, 06:32 PM
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
(17-03-2012 11:33 AM)Azaraith Wrote:  
(16-03-2012 01:56 AM)Egor Wrote:  
(08-03-2012 03:10 PM)JLMomma Wrote:  After growing up in a devoutly religious family and being heavily indoctrinated in Christianity I want my children to be able to make their own choice.

How's a five-year-old going to do that? And if they grow up without religious instruction, how are they going to be free to make any choice beyond agnosticisim?

That has to be one of the dumbest arguments I've heard. One should not indoctrinate a kid in a religion, for one. They are free to make whatever choice they want when older, but indoctrinating them in a religion makes that choice for them in favor of whatever religion it is you choose. I see it like this: you're at a buffet with steak, hamburgers, mac & cheese, etc. You're saying you should fill your kid's plate with only mac & cheese so that they are free to make any choice beyond not eating. How can you not see that that's retarded?

(16-03-2012 01:56 AM)Egor Wrote:  
Quote:I'm finding though that my relatives are pushing their own beliefs.

One night, my 5 yr old started telling me about Jesus loving her and how when she does bad things it makes him sad and that she has to pray to say sorry to him. She is a very advanced reader soon after this little bed time revelation she started reading a children's bible that was a gift from a family member.

Yeah, you should change that behavior right away.

Quote:I'm upset because I don't want her thinking there's some imaginary being is watching her or that she owes this being anything much less an apology. I was so scared of hell and demons when I was growing up. I don't want my kids to think that anything like that is even remotely real.

So can't you just let her believe in Jesus? Why do you have to rip that away from her?

So can't you just let her believe in Xenu? Allah? Her family's delusion of choice shouldn't be thrust upon her kid. If they're old enough to understand, that's one thing. At 5, kids believe everything their parents and authority figures tell them (for the most part lol). For one, the Jesus character in the Bible is a douche.

Jebus Wrote:And the disciples having come near, said to him, `Wherefore in similes dost thou speak to them?' And he answering said to them that -- `To you it hath been given to know the secrets of the reign of the heavens, and to these it hath not been given, for whoever hath, it shall be given to him, and he shall have overabundance, and whoever hath not, even that which he hath shall be taken from him. Because of this, in similes do I speak to them, because seeing they do not see, and hearing they do not hear, nor understand, and fulfilled on them is the prophecy of Isaiah, that saith, With hearing ye shall hear, and ye shall not understand, and seeing ye shall see, and ye shall not perceive, for made gross was the heart of this people, and with the ears they heard heavily, and their eyes they did close, lest they might see with the eyes, and with the ears might hear, and with the heart understand, and turn back, and I might heal them.

In other words, He chose to speak in confusing terms in order to fulfill a prophecy (self-fulfilling prophecy ftw) and so that "they" wouldn't understand, so he wouldn't have to accept them and heal them. Basically, "Screw you guys, I only want to help these other guys". Add to that the other parts where he's said he came to bring the sword, that families will divide themselves, to abandon their families and follow him, and where he instructed people to "let the dead bury the dead" and follow him. The Jesus character only preaches some basic moralities, but throws in a lot of guilt and superstition as well. None (or very little) of the things he said were original. The golden rule predates Christianity, and that's the most positive thing I can recall him saying.

(16-03-2012 01:56 AM)Egor Wrote:  
Quote:I feel like the whole Jesus topic is not even age appropriate for her. I wouldn't let her watch a show as scary and violent as the jesus story so why if it's someone religion is it appropriate?

2000 years of passion plays and suddenly they're not appropriate for children. Imagine that.

The Bible contains a lot of violence and sexuality that would bring up questions in a kid's mind that they aren't ready for, if they even understand what's going on.

(16-03-2012 01:56 AM)Egor Wrote:  
Quote:I feel like I'm being forced to bias her because other people can't mind their own business and have to push their beliefs on my child. It's so overbearing to teach my child something they know I don't believe. It's ridiculous.

But you still want them to babysit, right? I mean for as terrible as it all is that your daughter recognizes fault in herself and wants to be better in the future, we don't want Grandma to stop watching her.

Quote:So far I've been countering this by reading through the children's bible with her and discussing the stories. Pointing out obvious things like in the creation story when god separated the light from the darkness two days before he made the sun. I asked her where she thought the light came from before there was sun or stars.


Wait...I got this one...I think I know what she said, now I'm going out on a limb here: "I don't know, Mommy."

Quote:I don't know how to approach my mother about this. It may not have been her to talk to her but either way she slips things into conversation all of the time and it really bothers me. I need to tell talk to her about it soon. Religion has always been a touchy subject between us and though I value our relationship it's very fragile. I don't want to jeopardize it because I've spent so long trying to rebuild it.

So step aside. If you have no faith, then step aside and let your mother handle that part. She'd probably be glad to. All you have to do is nothing. Or maybe you could fake it if your kid wants you to read the Bible to her.

I'll tell you something: You think the the light and sun question was hard. Just wait until she's 13 and screaming "Why the hell should I listen to you!" You'll wish you hadn't made her an atheist then.

So, she should give up and let her mother raise her kid, because she doesn't have faith. The church thrives on indoctrinating kids when they're young, then keeping it going by villainizing those that don't believe and making people feel guilty if they so much as question anything. She shouldn't let her kid succumb to this garbage, it's her kid and she has the right to raise her kid in the way she feels is best. Letting her kid make up her own mind, rather than being indoctrinated at 5, is a much better approach. If Christianity had any truth to it, there would be no reason to be afraid that someone wouldn't choose to believe it without being indoctrinated from when they were young.
[/quote]

Awesome! Well said!

Funnily enough, I was thinking of the big Mac analogy too. Christianity is like Macdonalds. You wouldn't feed your child Macdonalds every day because it would make them sick. Atheism is like offering your child a massive banquet of fresh healthy food from which he may pick and choose.

Churches are the shareholders in the Macdonalds corporation. They promote their toxic product for their own financial gain.
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17-03-2012, 06:58 PM (This post was last modified: 17-03-2012 08:07 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
(17-03-2012 09:15 AM)Clint Barnett Wrote:  After reading the posts on this topic I've come to realize that even the atheists that were once religious still have no problem with having a choice of believing in lies. We fight, argue, discredit lies constantly. If you allow your children the opportunity to believe in lies and don't inform them of the reality of things you might as well be promoting misinformation.

I educated mine in logic. Giving them the opportunity to believe in lies is their qualifying exam. I want them to have that opportunity. ... Well that, and the Catholic Church made me promise not to interfere with their Catholic indoctrination in order for this atheist to be married by a priest in a Catholic Church. ... Given that many of logic's forefathers were highly religious (some even Catholic), I didn't break my promise.

#sigh
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17-03-2012, 09:16 PM
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
I wish I had cool atheistic parents like you. I've met a few people who had the good fortune to grow up as atheists, and to me they seem like characters from an advanced civilization out of science fiction.
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17-03-2012, 09:28 PM
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
(17-03-2012 09:16 PM)advancedatheist Wrote:  I wish I had cool atheistic parents like you.

I had cool Christian parents.

#sigh
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18-03-2012, 02:22 AM
 
RE: Raising free thinking children with religious family
(17-03-2012 09:15 AM)Clint Barnett Wrote:  After reading the posts on this topic I've come to realize that even the atheists that were once religious still have no problem with having a choice of believing in lies. We fight, argue, discredit lies constantly. If you allow your children the opportunity to believe in lies and don't inform them of the reality of things you might as well be promoting misinformation.

I understand the need for learning something on your own, but providing the facts when you know the children are misled is a must. I do not sympathize with religious beliefs. I refuse to enable a crutch in life when I have to stand on my own two feet.

The moment you say you allow your children to have a choice to be religious or not is the moment you fail them. Imagine the next time you are arguing with some delusional freak on the net and put the image of your child in the place of that freak. That's what your child could be doing one day if you give them the choice to promote lies and falsities. I can only provide the correct way and if at some point my children choose the wrong path, I can only hope I provided enough tools to keep them steady and I will continue to give facts along the way.

Remember, they won't always ask the questions you would ask. They will hear that an invisible sky daddy is watching over them and they are perfectly safe and believe it at some point. Why would they ask the question if everyone around them is telling them it is so. You have to be perceptive and aware of the hoards of information that is attacking your child's mind. Think about that one time you didn't ask the question and just assumed, later find out you were wrong and wondered why know one told you before hand.

I will bet you tell your child that they need good grades in school. Why aren't you giving them a choice of having bad grades or good grades? It's obvious why; because you know they won't always make the correct choices in life and you know you have to provide them with the correct path and fight to keep them on it. It is a long road to giving up religious empathy but that day will come. Especially as we start to have more Atheists not having to have been freed from religion.

You sound like a very controlling individual. I think your attitude reflects more that you are a jealous god rather than any concern you have over the real existence of God. I think when it comes to your kids, you simply will have no other god's before you.

You must really hate it when Jesus tells people to call no man "father" for they have only one Father in heaven.

You think you have control over your children's beliefs. You don't, and you won't. God will have His way with you and your kids.

I thought about rewording that, but nah, I'll just leave it...Cool
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