Rehabilitation or Recidivism? Or Lock Them Up for Life?
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03-02-2018, 05:53 PM
Question Rehabilitation or Recidivism? Or Lock Them Up for Life?
This is a story about a well-known Aussie career criminal, and discusses in part the prospects of his rehabilitation over time,
plus appropriate willingness on his part in order to prove unequivocally that he's ready for release back into society.

Chris Binse has taken one step to reform: Can he make the journey to redemption?

Personally, I don't believe that a lifelong criminal can ever be rehabilitated, regardless of determined psychological counselling, educational retraining, or vocational training.
In Australia, the rate of criminal recidivism is 32% to 48% depending on the state. This compares with the US all-states rate of 49.3% (latest available figure, both countries).

A few salient bits from the article:

"There are crooks that while they can't or won't reform, learn to fake the right answers to sentencing judges or stern-faced parole boards. There are crooks who leave jail filled with noble intentions only to fall back into bad habits somewhere down the track...

Now 49, Binse has spent 32 of the last 36 years in prison, has been left in chains and has done more solitary time than any inmate in Australia...

Whether he was born bad or the brutality of the system warped him even further we will never know. Whatever the reason, judges, police and prison officers would say he was a lost cause...

Certainly his last stint on the outside, in 2012, would seem to indicate he was a hopeless case. Soon he had armed himself to the teeth, hunted down an old prison enemy, pulled a textbook armed robbery, escaping with $235,000, pulled guns on police and held out for 44 hours in a [Melbourne suburb] siege...

In 2014, Justice Terry Forrest in the Supreme Court understandably judged his chances of rehabilitation as poor and sentenced him to a minimum of 14 years...".


• Is rehabilitation worth the effort for obviously hardened, repeat serious offenders, or is it a waste of both taxpayer's money and the justice system's resources?

• With between one in three, and half of released criminals being arrested for criminal acts within the next 5 years, is rehabilitation maybe at least somewhat effective, or is it ultimately pointless and ineffective?

• Does presumed successful rehabilitation inequitably increase the risk to the general public—considering that so many released criminals re-offend, sometimes with crimes of violence?

• Are some individuals actually born bad; is their criminality nature or nurturing?

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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03-02-2018, 05:56 PM
RE: Rehabilitation or Recidivism? Or Lock Them Up for Life?
(03-02-2018 05:53 PM)SYZ Wrote:  • Are some individuals actually born bad; is their criminality nature or nurturing?

Nurture, my fine OzMan friend, nobody is born a dick, assholes are cultivated not born. Smile

#sigh
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03-02-2018, 06:41 PM
RE: Rehabilitation or Recidivism? Or Lock Them Up for Life?
If the recidivism rate is as high as a third to almost half, that still indicates that at least half aren't getting into trouble after their release. I don't understand your reasoning here.

My own experience with ex cons and recidivism is that even with support, some turn back to crime. Also some don't. Not all of the ones who turn back to crime are "bad" people (some of them were pretty good baby-sitters for us kids, lots of fun to be around, and quite responsible). Not all of the ones who abstain from crime are "good" people, either--the biggest asshole I ever knew did his prison time and never committed another crime afterwards, but he was an absolute dick for the rest of his life.

I don't think anyone's born good, frankly.
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