Religion in classical history
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
18-08-2014, 04:26 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
(18-08-2014 04:00 PM)cjlr Wrote:  Not that modern Christianity is really monotheistic by any honest definition anyway.
(cough Satan cough cough)

Also the Trinity. Both Jews and Muslims consider that concept to be polytheistic ("Three powers in Heaven!").
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
18-08-2014, 04:33 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
(18-08-2014 04:26 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  
(18-08-2014 04:00 PM)cjlr Wrote:  Not that modern Christianity is really monotheistic by any honest definition anyway.
(cough Satan cough cough)

Also the Trinity. Both Jews and Muslims consider that concept to be polytheistic ("Three powers in Heaven!").

Catholicism is practically pagan with all the saints.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Revenant77x's post
18-08-2014, 04:49 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
Quote:the similarities between Jesus and Horus.


You might want to read this.

http://www.unrv.com/culture/isis.php

Atheism is NOT a Religion. It's A Personal Relationship With Reality!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
18-08-2014, 04:52 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
(18-08-2014 04:49 PM)Minimalist Wrote:  
Quote:the similarities between Jesus and Horus.


You might want to read this.

http://www.unrv.com/culture/isis.php

Or better yet, find something that isn't unsourced and anonymous.

(I mean, I glanced that over and it looked reasonably accurate, but still)

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
18-08-2014, 04:53 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
(18-08-2014 04:00 PM)cjlr Wrote:  
(18-08-2014 03:18 PM)SunnyD1 Wrote:  How did the Greeks steal the "ground of all being" concept from Christian theology when ancient Greece happened to exist BEFORE Christianity? I'm pretty confused on that part.

That's because you read it wrong.

(18-08-2014 02:30 PM)cjlr Wrote:  The "ground of all being" concept in Christian theology was in fact stolen wholesale from the Greeks.

And,
(18-08-2014 03:18 PM)SunnyD1 Wrote:  It's also a debate going on that Christianity is henotheistic as in the ten commandments the second commandment (I think the second) insists on having no other gods. The debate is whether this could be perceived as god acknowledging the existence of other gods with the insistence that only he should be worshiped.

There's no serious debate on the subject. All ancient religion was henotheistic!

Not that modern Christianity is really monotheistic by any honest definition anyway.
(cough Satan cough cough)

Ah! Apologies for misreading that then. I figured as such. The discussion about henotheism has helped me contextualise with what I needed. Much appreciated Smile

Saints live in flames; wise men, next to them.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
18-08-2014, 05:41 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
(18-08-2014 04:52 PM)cjlr Wrote:  
(18-08-2014 04:49 PM)Minimalist Wrote:  You might want to read this.

http://www.unrv.com/culture/isis.php

Or better yet, find something that isn't unsourced and anonymous.

(I mean, I glanced that over and it looked reasonably accurate, but still)

You are not going to find footnotes on the web.... and they do have a bibliography listed.

Atheism is NOT a Religion. It's A Personal Relationship With Reality!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
18-08-2014, 09:18 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
(18-08-2014 05:41 PM)Minimalist Wrote:  
(18-08-2014 04:52 PM)cjlr Wrote:  Or better yet, find something that isn't unsourced and anonymous.

(I mean, I glanced that over and it looked reasonably accurate, but still)

You are not going to find footnotes on the web...

This has a few.

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
19-08-2014, 11:58 AM
RE: Religion in classical history
Archaeologist William Dever stopped footnoting his books on the theory that footnotes detract from the narrative. As an alternative he discusses his sources within the narrative itself, weaving the source's point into the text, instead of forcing the reader to read the footnote. It is quite an effective method.

In contrast I recall starting to read "The Early History of God" by Mark Smith and getting terribly frustrated by the footnotes...which were in tiny font that at my age is difficult to read without changing glasses. When I got to a page with 4 lines of text and a footnote about 7 inches long I put the book down and never picked it up again. Too much work.

Atheism is NOT a Religion. It's A Personal Relationship With Reality!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
19-08-2014, 12:40 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
(19-08-2014 11:58 AM)Minimalist Wrote:  Archaeologist William Dever stopped footnoting his books on the theory that footnotes detract from the narrative. As an alternative he discusses his sources within the narrative itself, weaving the source's point into the text, instead of forcing the reader to read the footnote. It is quite an effective method.

In contrast I recall starting to read "The Early History of God" by Mark Smith and getting terribly frustrated by the footnotes...which were in tiny font that at my age is difficult to read without changing glasses. When I got to a page with 4 lines of text and a footnote about 7 inches long I put the book down and never picked it up again. Too much work.

Actually, the guy who "weaves the source's point into the text" is the one who is, in essence, forcing you to read the footnotes. When footnotes are separate, you are not obligated to read them -- that's one of the best reasons for keeping them separate. It is perfectly OK to read the main text and ignore the footnotes, and I often do that. The footnotes are there if you're curious about sources, etc., but nobody is forcing you to read them.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
20-08-2014, 03:29 PM
RE: Religion in classical history
(18-08-2014 04:33 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(18-08-2014 04:26 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  Also the Trinity. Both Jews and Muslims consider that concept to be polytheistic ("Three powers in Heaven!").

Catholicism is practically pagan with all the saints.

Catholicism is basically a hijacked form of paganism. So many of the saints reflect many pagan characteristics as well as many of the Catholic days of observance: Feb 2 St. Brigid's day, also Imbolc; Christmas which is also Yule or the Winter Solstice; Easter which generally falls between two pagan fertility sabbats Ostara and Beltane.... They had to start somewhere with their version of religion so that they could gain control, assimilate them all. Most pre-Christian religions were polytheistic. And prior to that, there really wasn't a need for religion when we were hunters and gatherers. When we settled into larger 'cities' and social structures did the need for gods appear to explain what couldn't be explained and to gain control of the greater population.

I tend to ask random questions, sometime stupid ones, but I can almost guarantee I'm smarter for asking than not.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: