Religion's Utility
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21-06-2015, 09:15 PM
RE: Religion's Utility
(21-06-2015 09:14 PM)KUSA Wrote:  
(21-06-2015 06:26 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  You speak from experience? ... If not shut the fuck up.

Eat a dick.

Boiled or fried?

There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
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22-06-2015, 03:52 AM
RE: Religion's Utility
its at best a placebo
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22-06-2015, 04:22 AM
RE: Religion's Utility
(22-06-2015 03:52 AM)Ace Wrote:  its at best a placebo

Boiled or fried?

Huh

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22-06-2015, 06:25 AM
RE: Religion's Utility
(22-06-2015 04:22 AM)DLJ Wrote:  
(22-06-2015 03:52 AM)Ace Wrote:  its at best a placebo

Boiled or fried?

Huh

If I tell you which is the placebo, it will stop working. Try both to be on the safe side.
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22-06-2015, 06:48 AM
RE: Religion's Utility
(21-06-2015 10:33 AM)Airportkid Wrote:  It does something for some people. But what, if anything, does it do for someone that cannot be done without religion - i.e. what's religion doing for you that ONLY religion can do for you?

I guess the question here would have to be, is there something that's particularly different or unique about the lives, and being of certain religious people, that's not present in the lives of unbelievers?

I think the answer is yes, though I know others would answer differently based on their own experiences. I think one of the most glaring difference, is that the language, and overall sense of life tend to be distinct, because for believers of pretty much any stripe life is goal-oriented, teleological, and any particularly discussion about goodness, morality, justice, wholeness, love, the soul, forgiveness, meaning etc.. are incapsulated by this. A believer is always seeking some supposed path, a road they must find and walk on, while for most unbelievers I'd say, believe no such path exist.

Atheists, particular those prone to some degree of self awareness, there is a sense in which these terms of value begin to erode in a non-telelogical view, that it sometimes appears that in discussion among believers and unbelievers that they are both talking about entirely different things.
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22-06-2015, 06:54 AM
RE: Religion's Utility
I think when a lot of people "de-convert" they face a crisis of self-identity. What am I if I'm not a believer? What purpose does my life have if I'm not glorifying God or working towards Heaven? Where do I belong if I'm not part of a church community? I was 12 or 13 when this happened to me; I quickly found other things to live for and other communities to belong to and I don't miss it at all. I have two sons, we're not raising them in a church, and I don't think they'll be missing out on any experience or sense of belonging that they can't get some other way, school, summer camp, sports teams, musical instruments/bands, etc.
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22-06-2015, 07:00 AM
RE: Religion's Utility
(22-06-2015 06:48 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(21-06-2015 10:33 AM)Airportkid Wrote:  It does something for some people. But what, if anything, does it do for someone that cannot be done without religion - i.e. what's religion doing for you that ONLY religion can do for you?

I guess the question here would have to be, is there something that's particularly different or unique about the lives, and being of certain religious people, that's not present in the lives of unbelievers?

I think the answer is yes, though I know others would answer differently based on their own experiences. I think one of the most glaring difference, is that the language, and overall sense of life tend to be distinct, because for believers of pretty much any stripe life is goal-oriented, teleological, and any particularly discussion about goodness, morality, justice, wholeness, love, the soul, forgiveness, meaning etc.. are incapsulated by this. A believer is always seeking some supposed path, a road they must find and walk on, while for most unbelievers I'd say, believe no such path exist.

Atheists, particular those prone to some degree of self awareness, there is a sense in which these terms of value begin to erode in a non-telelogical view, that it sometimes appears that in discussion among believers and unbelievers that they are both talking about entirely different things.

Apparently the American definition of "path" is 'hypocrite with head up ass who attends church once a week to feel superior to anyone who disagrees'.

Most Christians I've ever met in the real world are only Christians in name and when its convenient.
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22-06-2015, 07:30 AM (This post was last modified: 22-06-2015 07:34 AM by Tomasia.)
RE: Religion's Utility
(22-06-2015 07:00 AM)Fodder_From_The_Truth Wrote:  Apparently the American definition of "path" is 'hypocrite with head up ass who attends church once a week to feel superior to anyone who disagrees'.

Yes, the hypocrite too, sees himself traveling on a narrow path, sometimes two of them, but so do certain righteous men of conviction, like Rev. King, and that bewildered black community that traveled along with him.

I don't think it always about feeling superior either, but a means not to be bewildered in a life that at one end is all sound and fury, signifying nothing. For believers life will always appear to be more than that, but for unbelievers it can often seem like that is all there is, in fact there does some to be some good arguments for it too.
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22-06-2015, 08:59 AM
RE: Religion's Utility
There isn't anything that someone can do with religion that they can't do without religion. Religion is nothing more than a delusion at best, or a terrible weapon at worst. It makes the prospect of controlling a large group of people easy and sometimes that control is to the point where they will commit atrocities against people that they wouldn't do if they didn't have a religious belief. The delusion is so powerful because if there is one thing that people feel the most fear of it's Death. Religion gives people a false sense of security in that they know what's going to happen to them after they die and that they shouldn't worry about what happens in this life.

Ultimately, religion cheapens life as any accomplishments in life, any hard work that person does, or the hard work that others do to make the world a better place is attributed to a god rather than to the person that did the work, even with AA it cheapens how much of an accomplishment it is to break an addiction, especially since the real reason that they were able to break their addiction to alcohol is that they had the power inside themselves to break the addiction they didn't need a god figure to do it they just needed the will within themselves and support of others to do so.

“We can judge our progress by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers, our willingness to embrace what is true rather than what feels good.”
― Carl Sagan
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22-06-2015, 01:08 PM
RE: Religion's Utility
(22-06-2015 04:22 AM)DLJ Wrote:  
(22-06-2015 03:52 AM)Ace Wrote:  its at best a placebo

Boiled or fried?

Huh

bbq'd over coal
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