Religious Right gains balance of power in Australian Election
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12-05-2015, 09:37 PM
RE: Religious Right gains balance of power in Australian Election
Quote:- Banning X-rated movies.

Because Australian censorship isn't bad enough already?
Seriously, you guys have the worst censorship ever and we innocent little Kiwi's often suffer because we get the censored Australian version rather than the non-censored version that the rest of the world gets.

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12-05-2015, 09:48 PM
RE: Religious Right gains balance of power in Australian Election
(12-05-2015 09:37 PM)earmuffs Wrote:  
Quote:- Banning X-rated movies.

Because Australian censorship isn't bad enough already?
Seriously, you guys have the worst censorship ever and we innocent little Kiwi's often suffer because we get the censored Australian version rather than the non-censored version that the rest of the world gets.

There ya go, a niche that needs filling. You could usher in the New Zealand uncensored porn industry.
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13-05-2015, 07:49 AM
RE: Religious Right gains balance of power in Australian Election
I'm not talking about porn. I just mean things in general. Movies, video games, TV shows.
ie: the South Park video game was censored in several places. But only in Australia. We, Kiwi's, got the censored version even though our head censor dude is a homo (literally, he likes the dick) and so is liberal as fuck.

We suffer yet again because the Australians are a bunch of retards.

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13-05-2015, 06:51 PM
RE: Religious Right gains balance of power in Australian Election
(12-05-2015 08:06 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  Voting is mandatory in Australia. The turnout was 90.49% down 2.06% with 3.44% of votes cast as informal[2]. Australia also uses preferential voting, aka "instant run-off" where the voter numbers squares in preference order rather than choosing a single candidate. The election is counted in cycles. Each time the candidate with the least votes is removed and their votes redistributed according to voter preferences to other candidates until there is a result.

There has been a bit of monkeying around with the preferential system in Australia of late, though. Although it is the voter's choice parties will tend to hand out "how to vote" cards that show the preference order the party prefers and many if not most voters will fill out their ballot according to the card. This allows parties to influence who will get the vote should they themselves be eliminated.

This monkeying around is particularly pronounced in senate elections that have too many candidates for most voters to practically consider filling out every square. When there are more than 20 or so candidates available the ballot may contain a list of boxes at the top that act like the how to vote cards. The voter chooses only one of the boxes and the party they chose will explicitly control the preference flow for that vote. Last federal election I myself voted not necessarily for the party I would most prefer to see in power but instead the party that had preference flows I more or less agreed with and could stand behind.

So the monkeying around in senate elections has been parties engineering their preference flows not to go necessarily to sensible next-best major parties, but have tended to put major parties last. Small parties with diametrically opposed views have been directing preferences to each other over larger parties that they are better ideologically aligned to. This has lead to more balance of power situations than in the past where minor parties have been able to wield power... but which minor party will it be? It's anyone's guess. It's pretty much random, and it doesn't reflect the will the people.

So last time my senate vote went to the secular party of Australia. They didn't get into these silly deals, but rather directed their preferences according the answer they received from other parties to a questionnaire that basically boiled down to "how much of a looney toon are you". Funnily enough this was a good basis for directing flows and matched my political views pretty well over all.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_South_W...tion,_2015
[2] http://www.aec.gov.au/voting/informal_voting/

Oddly enough, mandated voting is one of the few things I actually know about Australia's voting system. I was just referring to elections throughout the world, and not Australia's in particular. I should have been more clear.

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