Right-handedness
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30-05-2015, 02:31 PM
RE: Right-handedness
(30-05-2015 07:02 AM)Andy-Gadget Wrote:  Hi all, first post, go easy on me :-)

Right eye dominant shooters will tell you, when shooting a right hand rifle, to


Hi, AG. Welcome to the forum.

I know next to nothing about guns. But I thought guns didn't have an 'eye-preference'. Learn something every day.
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30-05-2015, 02:52 PM
RE: Right-handedness
(30-05-2015 02:31 PM)jockmcdock Wrote:  
(30-05-2015 07:02 AM)Andy-Gadget Wrote:  Hi all, first post, go easy on me :-)

Right eye dominant shooters will tell you, when shooting a right hand rifle, to


Hi, AG. Welcome to the forum.

I know next to nothing about guns. But I thought guns didn't have an 'eye-preference'. Learn something every day.

The sights don't, but most modern guns are designed so that spent cartridges are ejected away from the body - burning hot bits of metal and such aren't good for the skin - thus, held to one side or the other of the body. Actually, working out that sort of thing was a big problem back when people were developing the first semi-automatic weapons...

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30-05-2015, 02:54 PM
RE: Right-handedness
I've found the most interesting test of "handedness" - and I mean in the broader sense, including vision, hands, legs, whatever - to be live sparring. Anyone who favours one side too heavily is going to get wrecked.

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30-05-2015, 03:46 PM
RE: Right-handedness
(30-05-2015 02:52 PM)cjlr Wrote:  The sights don't, but most modern guns are designed so that spent cartridges are ejected away from the body - burning hot bits of metal and such aren't good for the skin - thus, held to one side or the other of the body. Actually, working out that sort of thing was a big problem back when people were developing the first semi-automatic weapons...

That seem pretty obvious once you point it out. My experience with guns was firing a .22 50 years ago.

Thanks.
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14-06-2015, 10:38 PM
Handedness in ancient animals
Getting back to handedness and prehistory, behavioral laterality ("handedness") goes back at least to the Cambrian. The evidence is from healed bite marks in fossil trilobites - statistics show a strong preferential occurrence on one side of the body. Check out Ohio State University's Professor Loren Babcock's publications on this in the paleontological literature.

For example:
Babcock (1993) - Trilobite malformations and the fossil record of behavioral asymmetry. Journal of Paleontology 67(2): 217-229.

For a much younger geologic example, Pleistocene fossil elephants show "tuskedness" - tusks on one side are more worn down than the other.
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14-06-2015, 11:12 PM
RE: Right-handedness
(28-05-2015 11:06 AM)jennybee Wrote:  I use my fork/chopsticks everything in right hand. I remember (inadvertently) being taught to use my right hand for most things. I do think it can also have an evolutionary basis, but I still think it can be a learned behavior (at least partially). For instance, children watch parents to learn how to do a variety of tasks and it is easier to imitate someone using the same hand. That said, I agree that the evolutionary basis is probably stronger.

When teaching small children drumming, they usually sit at a right handed set up. This means the principle time keeping cymbal, the hi hat, is always to their left. To a fault every small child will play left hand lead. It makes no sense to cross their right arm over to the left the way adults do. As a result of seeing this so often I began playing using left hand lead. Now after several years both hands sound the same.

Although I still use chopsticks in my right hand. Smile

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14-06-2015, 11:30 PM
RE: Right-handedness
(14-06-2015 10:38 PM)JSJ Wrote:  Getting back to handedness and prehistory, behavioral laterality ("handedness") goes back at least to the Cambrian. The evidence is from healed bite marks in fossil trilobites - statistics show a strong preferential occurrence on one side of the body. Check out Ohio State University's Professor Loren Babcock's publications on this in the paleontological literature.

For example:
Babcock (1993) - Trilobite malformations and the fossil record of behavioral asymmetry. Journal of Paleontology 67(2): 217-229.

For a much younger geologic example, Pleistocene fossil elephants show "tuskedness" - tusks on one side are more worn down than the other.


Welcome to TTA.

It's good to have a newbie who knows stuff.

(compared to the recent influx who insist on telling us what we think)

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19-06-2015, 01:30 AM
RE: Right-handedness
Pythons are right-handed, but kangaroos are lefties.

'And interesting side note is, when it had a choice of which penis to use, the snake usually used its right penis. Even snakes are “right handed.”

http://io9.com/why-do-snakes-have-a-hemi...1711449227

'Kangaroos are left-handed, according to a new study.

The finding challenges a prior assumption that the consistent favouring of one hand over the other is a characteristic unique to humans and certain primates.

Wildlife ecologist Janeane Ingram said it was the first time a marsupial population had been shown to have such a strong preference for one hand, with the observed kangaroos showing a left-handed preference 95% of the time.

The joint study was conducted by the University of Tasmania and University of New South Wales, along with researchers Andrey Giljov, Karina Karenina and associate professor Yegor Malashichev from Saint Petersburg State University, who had first observed the trait in red-necked wallabies kept in Russian zoos.'

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/ju...ation-from
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19-06-2015, 05:07 AM
RE: Right-handedness
(19-06-2015 01:30 AM)jockmcdock Wrote:  Wildlife ecologist Janeane Ingram said it was the first time a marsupial population had been shown to have such a strong preference for one hand, with the observed kangaroos showing a left-handed preference 95% of the time.

I knew it - kangaroos are sinister.

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19-06-2015, 10:55 AM
RE: Right-handedness
(19-06-2015 05:07 AM)Chas Wrote:  I knew it - kangaroos are sinister.
You just had to go there.
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