Roadside Memorials
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17-08-2017, 08:52 AM
RE: Roadside Memorials
(16-08-2017 05:01 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(16-08-2017 04:41 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  unsapien---I despise tattered flags too, ESPECIALLY on any school or government property!

I like tattered flags. The new, crisp ones feel phony and actually, a tad insulting even. Somebody must've written a song about this. ...

Oh? Say...Consider ....can you see Girly by the dawns early light?

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17-08-2017, 09:09 AM (This post was last modified: 17-08-2017 09:54 AM by Dom.)
RE: Roadside Memorials
(17-08-2017 08:45 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  The road side memorials, I think, keep people kinda stuck in grief.

Actually, it allows them to imagine they are talking to the person, which can be cathartic, especially if you have unfinished business. It's the same as people writing letters to the deceased, it gets a load off.

As time passes, the memorial becomes just a place to imagine one is interacting with the person, from memory one knows anyway what they would say. Think of it as meditation on that person. For people who visit graves and memorials in the long term, it's a calming, meditative thing. And a way of keeping the relationship alive, since it disappeared from real life but exists in the brain. The grave/memorial is a trigger that first releases pain and later becomes some sort of trigger to activate that person's memory. For people who are so inclined, they are a positive, healing thing.

Other people keep a possession, or old letters, or whatever as memory triggers. Or it can be a song, or a tree planted for the dead person, or whatever your thing may be.

After a time, one goes through daily life without any triggers, and seeking out a trigger periodically to keep the memories alive is something many, many people do in various ways. Whatever rocks their boat.

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17-08-2017, 01:24 PM
RE: Roadside Memorials
Here in Australia, numerous local councils have been unfairly rebuked by the god-botherers for removing roadside memorials after they turned into mini rubbish dumps. Our roadsides are owned by the government, and it's ultimately illegal to construct any signage, structure, or memorial on government property without prior approval and in compliance with specific regulations.

Personally, I don't agree with their placement, and see them as harking back to a much earlier period of ignorant religiosity, as they invariably include at least some sort of religious symbolism.

Where more than one person has been killed in separate road accidents at a so-called "black spot", the federal road authority puts these signs at that location.

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17-08-2017, 01:28 PM
RE: Roadside Memorials
I can't say I really care, so long as they don't impinge the shoulder or roadway -- and I've seen many of these shrines, but nary a one that obstructs any driving.
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17-08-2017, 04:57 PM
RE: Roadside Memorials
(16-08-2017 03:09 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  Opinions invited.

The subject is home made memorials on the shoulders of public roads. This is a common sight in North Carolina. In case this is something not so common elsewhere, I'll describe.
We have them here.
This being Oregon, we frequently see them for pets, as well as for people.

Quote:Tinytown tragically lost a whole family to a traffic accident when my daughter over 20 years ago. The relatives officially "adopted" the road near the intersection. This was (and still is) a government-sanctioned, acceptable thing to do---it involved erecting an official DOT sign and a commitment on the part of the people adopting the two mile stretch---to pick up the garbage. To keep the adopted road free of litter. Stretches of road can be adopted by pretty much anyone--a business can adopt it and put their name on it. I've seen some dedicated to a family's dogs that they walked in that particular stretch. Can be dedicated to living or dead. Boy Scouts, Shriners, other civic groups can adopt a stretch of road and have their name on the sign. But what they all have in common is that the signs were government provided, officially erected, road signs. And they all come with a commitment to pick up the trash.
We have an "adopt-a-highway" program here, too. A lot of places do.
There was a furor a couple of years ago when a Georgia KKK chapter wanted to adopt a stretch of road.
I think they took their case all the way to the Supreme Court.

Quote:Hmmm. So does the fact that I am bothered by these constant reminders of death scattered along the roadsides give me the right to remove them? Does the fact that I don't wish to see crosses along the shoulder of public roads give me the right to remove them?
Here in Oregon we are, as community citizens, regularly encouraged to pick up roadside trash. I don't know that "roadside trash" has been specifically defined in state statute. I imagine one might get some flack -- likely in the form of "letters-to-the-editor" -- for unilaterally removing a recent memorial, but I doubt if any official ire would be raised over removing something that's been sitting there for a year or more. DOT here doesn't like these spontaneous memorials; they consider them hazards. But as I say, that's in Oregon; not sure how it might be in NC.

One way to find out for certain . . .

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17-08-2017, 07:59 PM
RE: Roadside Memorials
(16-08-2017 06:25 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  Yes, just a very few feet off the pavement. Like most of the ones I see around here. Passenger said the inexperienced driver was trying to get a better look at it on the other side of the road and ran off the pavement and over-corrected. Car flipped. Memorial was busted up by the accident and very shortly thereafter removed never to be replaced.

Oh shit. Hate to criticize a tragic situation, but if it was on the other side of the road, it could as well have been a broken down car, an accident, a cop pulling over a driver, a provocative billboard, etc., etc. The inexperienced driver more than anyone needs to be super-careful.

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17-08-2017, 08:05 PM
RE: Roadside Memorials
(17-08-2017 01:24 PM)SYZ Wrote:  Where more than one person has been killed in separate road accidents at a so-called "black spot", the federal road authority puts these signs at that location.

That is very peculiar but what the heck, probably is more effective than a generic "slow down," "sharp turn" or other warning sign. Around here we have various "X number have been killed on this highway since X" type signs

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17-08-2017, 08:12 PM
RE: Roadside Memorials
(17-08-2017 06:25 AM)abaris Wrote:  
(16-08-2017 05:45 PM)jerry mcmasters Wrote:  I can't drive more than five miles around here without seeing one, or, sadly, the little clusters of crosses.

It's save to say where there's clusters, there's road hazards, with or without crosses. People dying in the same spot over and over points to something being seriously wrong with road design.

No actually what I am referring to is little clusters of crosses that are all of the same design and purpose, like it was one crash with a family of victims. They will literally have a tall cross, a less-tall cross, and two or three small crosses, all in a purposeful row. That said, it could still be at a particularly tricky bend or whatever.

What I have never seen is two or more memorials at the exact same sight that clearly indicate different accidents. A lot of sleeping at the wheel incidents, maybe?

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18-08-2017, 08:32 PM
RE: Roadside Memorials
When I drove along a particularly twisty road in France years ago, I saw life size, black, metal silhouettes on many of the bends, some of them in families. Part memorial, part warning, grim but effective.

Mourners building their own shrines at an accident black spot sounds like a recipe for a repeat disaster.

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20-08-2017, 12:15 AM
RE: Roadside Memorials
I live in California where roadside memorials are supposedly illegal, but you'd never know it from the sheer number of them lining the streets.

Honestly, I'm ambivalent about roadside memorials. On the one hand, I think they pose an unnecessary distraction on our already overcrowded streets and could possibly even be a safety hazard, especially if mourners are gathering and/or leaving mementos, etc. And as time passes, they usually end up becoming unsightly piles of trash that no one want to remove for fear of being disrespectful.

On the other hand, I can understand the desire to publicly honor the memory of a loved one. I just always thought that's what cemeteries were for
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