Saddest picture of the century.
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27-01-2012, 04:28 PM (This post was last modified: 27-01-2012 04:46 PM by kim.)
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
(27-01-2012 03:34 PM)germanyt Wrote:  I personally am disgusted by this and am glad he killed himself.

I am glad that the world is rid of the kind of person who would leave a dying child to be eaten by a vulture. The situation presented no danger to the photographer other than disease, maybe. I like to think I'd have risked catching AIDS to save her life. And very little effort would have been require to put this girl in your truck and drive her a few miles to civilization.

No one would have "risked catching AIDS" by picking up this child. Where do you get this?
This photo was taken at a UN food distribution station, so she was already at "civilization", most probably with her mother who left her for a moment to get food being distributed. As were numerous other children who were being photographed by other photographers there.
****
I personally am disgusted at another's glee that a person has killed himself, most especially when one has no idea what was going through that man's head.

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27-01-2012, 05:02 PM (This post was last modified: 27-01-2012 05:54 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
(27-01-2012 03:34 PM)germanyt Wrote:  I am glad that the world is rid of the kind of person who would leave a dying child to be eaten by a vulture.

What makes you think he left her after taking her picture? ... I mean, how could he not help her?

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27-01-2012, 05:47 PM
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
(27-01-2012 03:50 PM)kim Wrote:  João Silva, a Portuguese photojournalist based in South Africa who accompanied Carter to Sudan, gave a different version of events in an interview with Japanese journalist and writer Akio Fujiwara that was published in Fujiwara's book The Boy who Became a Postcard.

According to Silva, they (Carter and Silva) went to Sudan with the United Nations aboard Operation Lifeline Sudan and landed in Southern Sudan on March 11, 1993. The UN told them that they would take off again in 30 minutes (the time necessary to distribute food), so they ran around looking to take shots. The UN started to distribute corn and the women of the village came out of their wooden huts to meet the plane. Silva went looking for guerrilla fighters, while Carter strayed no more than a few dozen feet from the plane.

Again according to Silva, Carter was quite shocked as it was the first time that he had seen a famine situation and so he took many shots of the children suffering from famine. Silva also started to take photos of children on the ground as if crying, which were not published. The parents of the children were busy taking food from the plane, so they had left their children only briefly while they collected the food. This was the situation for the girl in the photo taken by Carter. A vulture landed behind the girl. To get the two in focus, Carter approached the scene very slowly so as not to scare the vulture away and took a photo from approximately 10 metres. He took a few more photos before chasing the bird away.

Two Spanish photographers who were in the same area at that time, José María Luis Arenzana and Luis Davilla, without knowing the photograph of Kevin Carter, took a picture in a similar situation. As recounted on several occasions, it was a feeding center, and the vultures came from a manure pit waste:
We took him and Pepe Arenzana to Ayod, where most of the time were in a feeding center where locals go. At one end of the enclosure, was a dump where waste and was pulling people to defecate. As these children are so weak and malnourished they are going head giving the impression that they are dead. As part of the fauna there are vultures go for these remains. So if you grab a telephoto crush the child's perspective in the foreground and background and it seems that the vultures will eat it, but that's an absolute hoax, perhaps the animal is 20 meters.


On 27 July 1994 Carter drove to the Braamfontein Spruit river, near the Field and Study Centre, an area where he used to play as a child, and took his own life by taping one end of a hose to his pickup truck’s exhaust pipe and running the other end to the passenger-side window. He died of carbon monoxide poisoning, aged 33. Portions of Carter's suicide note read:
"I am depressed ... without phone ... money for rent ... money for child support ... money for debts ... money!!! ... I am haunted by the vivid memories of killings and corpses and anger and pain ... of starving or wounded children, of trigger-happy madmen, often police, of killer executioners ... I have gone to join Ken [recently deceased colleague Ken Oosterbroek] if I am that lucky.

Thanks for the overview. I was going to say, I don't think that taking the picture implies that the photographer didn't help - I'd like to know the full story before coming to that conclusion. Seeing that would make me want to take a quick photo and then help, as a photo can be extremely powerful to show the harsh reality of this world and shock others into realizing that truth, and potentially helping these people. Words can often be brushed aside by people or assumed to be exaggerations, but if this photo doesn't bring tears to your eyes and ask "how can I help these people?", I don't know that anything else could.

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28-01-2012, 12:09 AM (This post was last modified: 28-01-2012 12:17 AM by germanyt.)
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
(27-01-2012 05:02 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(27-01-2012 03:34 PM)germanyt Wrote:  I am glad that the world is rid of the kind of person who would leave a dying child to be eaten by a vulture.

What makes you think he left her after taking her picture? ... I mean, how could he not help her?

It's a fact. The photographer was heavily criticized. Apparently to the point of depression.i
(27-01-2012 04:28 PM)kim Wrote:  
(27-01-2012 03:34 PM)germanyt Wrote:  I personally am disgusted by this and am glad he killed himself.

I am glad that the world is rid of the kind of person who would leave a dying child to be eaten by a vulture. The situation presented no danger to the photographer other than disease, maybe. I like to think I'd have risked catching AIDS to save her life. And very little effort would have been require to put this girl in your truck and drive her a few miles to civilization.

No one would have "risked catching AIDS" by picking up this child. Where do you get this?
This photo was taken at a UN food distribution station, so she was already at "civilization", most probably with her mother who left her for a moment to get food being distributed. As were numerous other children who were being photographed by other photographers there.
****
I personally am disgusted at another's glee that a person has killed himself, most especially when one has no idea what was going through that man's head.

I was making a worst case scenario. AIDS happens to be a pretty big problem in Africa so I used it as an example. And the article states that it is not known what happened to the girl. Other articles also state that she was as much as 3 kilometers from any kind of help. He spent 20 minutes setting up his camera, took the pic, and left her. That is pretty much how its described in everything I've read about it.

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28-01-2012, 02:26 AM (This post was last modified: 28-01-2012 02:32 AM by ShirubaDangan.)
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
[Warning: Pictures are graphic.]

I've read other articles that say differently so I will not form an opinion on facts I do not have. I am not a theist and I also don't condone suicide.

I'm also deeply saddened by this picture and understand your anger and frustration. Is it right? No, but I believe the picture is valuable. It can offer something to the world very few things can. Almost all of us can unite and look at this with shock. They can reveal so much in one instant. From the pictures of the Holocaust victims
[Image: buchenwald5.jpg]
to the photo's of the cost of the Iraqi war.
[Image: deanne-fitzmaurice-lionheart.png]

Before I finish posting, I previously posted a video before and it has some pictures of our history. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pla...Sb7nvprNl0

Pictures can be worth more than a thousand words. Forgetting the worst of mankind will only allow us to repeat it. I doubt anyone wants to relive this.

"Mankind must put an end to war, or war will put an end to mankind." -John F Kennedy

The way to see by Faith is to shut the eye of Reason.” -Benjamin Franklin

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28-01-2012, 02:56 AM
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
I met Kevin Carter around the time this photo was taken. I was a crew member on several of the flights that were chartered by the UN and WFP to fly into several locations in Southern Sudan. We ferried anyone from photojournalists to doctors to station managers along with several thousand kilos of relief supplies.

At the time I was sporting a Nikon 6006 for a friend of mine and taking a lot of shots of just about anything and everything and then forwarding the film back to Florida to his stock shot business. Unfortunately, I was busy with my 'real job' and unable to accompany Kevin when he went about doing what he does best. There were a couple of other photojournalists on the flight, so I'm certain he wasn't the only one to get a shot similar to this. Famine such as this is widespread.

I must admit, I'm taken back somewhat by the proclamation that one would be 'glad he killed himself' for simply taking this photo. It's the photojournalists of the world that place their lives and their mental stability at risk to bring photos like this to the attention of the world. I can assure you that Kevin was shook up by the whole experience. He wasn't exactly charged on the flight back. Then again, I haven't met anyone that would be stoked after seeing the atrocity that one human could impose upon another.

Much of what some photojournalist see in the world isn't just through a lens, and they certainly don't do it for profit. That's left for the paparazzi in the UK, Europe and the US. Money is not the motivation to begging for ferry flights into an area stricken by famine or genocide just so you can get a tabloid shot. A photojournalist needs his shot to tell a story. A fraction of a moment in time must tell everything. It’s something one feels in their heart. What the reader never sees or hears is what happens after the shot is taken. It becomes personal at that point. Did anyone happen to see Kevin and another worker stomp their feet at the bird until it fled? Or by chance did anyone happen to see the two aid workers gently pick the child up and carry it into the shelter? Unfortunately, there’s no happy ending for the child but I can assure you that it was not left for the birds.

I am fortunate enough to have been able to talk out most of my anger through therapy and a truckload of Zoloft. There's no turning back of course. I refuse to live in the US anymore because I feel that my fellow citizens are so jacked up on their own misfortunes, they have no idea what it’s like to be truly wanting.

I can assure you that a high percentage of relief agencies and charitable organizations supported by the UN and religious sponsors are shams. If you want to be pissed at someone for exploiting a photo, be pissed at these people for using such propaganda to fuel the delivery of funding to their coffers. In 1992, it was estimated that 96% of all contributions went to ‘administrative costs’ for famine relief… and I attended a lot of parties in Nairobi that were paid for by these ‘contributions’.

Believe me, after spending two years in Africa and three years in Afghanistan, there’s no photojournalism assignment worth a Pulitzer.

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Thanks for getting off my back!"
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29-01-2012, 01:46 AM
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
(27-01-2012 03:34 PM)germanyt Wrote:  I am glad that the world is rid of the kind of person who would leave a dying child to be eaten by a vulture. The situation presented no danger to the photographer other than disease, maybe. I like to think I'd have risked catching AIDS to save her life. And very little effort would have been require to put this girl in your truck and drive her a few miles to civilization.

One thing you should learn in life...never assume anything. Learn the facts, learn the TRUTH before you pass judgment.
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30-01-2012, 10:29 AM
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
(29-01-2012 01:46 AM)JonM78 Wrote:  
(27-01-2012 03:34 PM)germanyt Wrote:  I am glad that the world is rid of the kind of person who would leave a dying child to be eaten by a vulture. The situation presented no danger to the photographer other than disease, maybe. I like to think I'd have risked catching AIDS to save her life. And very little effort would have been require to put this girl in your truck and drive her a few miles to civilization.

One thing you should learn in life...never assume anything. Learn the facts, learn the TRUTH before you pass judgment.

I didn't assume a single thing. All of my opinions are based on the same series of events told in several dozen different stories about this picture. Man saw girl, man took picture, man left girl to die, man kills self.

“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it's time to pause and reflect.”

-Mark Twain
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31-01-2012, 06:34 AM
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
Something is wrong with me. I don't feel a single thing when I look at these pictures......huh.
I understand how terrible these pictures are and wish to do something to help these people but I feel nothing........I blame Dead Space for desensitizing me.

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31-01-2012, 08:47 AM
RE: Saddest picture of the century.
(31-01-2012 06:34 AM)Hamata k Wrote:  Something is wrong with me. I don't feel a single thing when I look at these pictures......huh.
I understand how terrible these pictures are and wish to do something to help these people but I feel nothing........I blame Dead Space for desensitizing me.

The thought of children in Africa dying doesn't exactly keep me up at night. Its' a shit world we live in. What bothers me is the missed opportunity to potentially save a life. All in the name of professional photojournalism.

“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it's time to pause and reflect.”

-Mark Twain
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