Science for a former creationist
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10-08-2014, 12:10 AM
Science for a former creationist
Basically I have a real thirst for knowledge. Science and math used to be of little interest to me, but now I want to know how this world started, how we got here, how the universe works, and basically be an armchair scholar. Where do I start? Oh and I figured out what Douglas Adams meant by 42...its Jackie Robinson.
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10-08-2014, 04:48 AM
RE: Science for a former creationist
(10-08-2014 12:10 AM)MrSkeptic Wrote:  Basically I have a real thirst for knowledge. Science and math used to be of little interest to me, but now I want to know how this world started, how we got here, how the universe works, and basically be an armchair scholar. Where do I start? Oh and I figured out what Douglas Adams meant by 42...its Jackie Robinson.

Watch lectures by Stephen Hawking and Neil Degrasse Tyson. If you want to learn about evolution look up Richard Dawkins.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
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10-08-2014, 05:24 AM
RE: Science for a former creationist
I haven't actually seen it yet, but by most accounts the Cosmos remake starring Neil Degrass Tyson is a pretty good start: http://www.cosmosontv.com/

There is a lot of good introductory and intermediate level material on youtube. It depends on how deep you want to dive. If you want to get fairly deeply into the two key topics in modern physics (relativity and quantum mechanics) check out Ozmoroid's viascience channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/viascience - with fair warning that it is at an intermedite level beyond the typical introductory information.

If you are interested in geology and the history of earth's rocks, check out WildwoodClaire: https://www.youtube.com/user/WildwoodClaire1

Definitely check out most if not all of Brady's channels: http://periodicvideos.blogspot.com.au/20...nnels.html
Sixty Symbols, Numberphile and Deep Sky Videos are especially worthwhile.

Of course check out the Nerdfighteria channels: http://nerdfighteria.com/
Particularly check out the scishow and crash course channels.

There are a few worthwhile podcasts out there as well.

If you are interested in listening to a regular weekly podcast on science and scepticism, check out Skeptics Guide to the Universe: http://www.theskepticsguide.org/

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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10-08-2014, 10:58 AM
RE: Science for a former creationist
Thanks y'all
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10-08-2014, 11:18 AM
RE: Science for a former creationist
Potholer54debunk's channel on youtube is a great creationist debunking channel, you also learn a lot about how the scientists arrive at their conclusions watching his videos, a common creationist tactic is to cite a scientific paper that pulls a quote from a scientific paper showing discrepancies in radiological dating. They won't tell you that the paper was written to warn scientists about poor methodology that would lead to inaccurate results, so they can get more accurate results. (Citing bad carbon dating from sea animals for instance)

Here are some great videos:












Gods derive their power from post-hoc rationalizations. -The Inquisition

Using the supernatural to explain events in your life is a failure of the intellect to comprehend the world around you. -The Inquisition
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11-08-2014, 12:54 PM
RE: Science for a former creationist
Evolution...

Always good to start at the beginning with 'The Origin of Species' by Charles Darwin.

Then there's Dawkins' books.

Cosmology/Physics...

'A Brief History of Time' and 'The Grand Design'... Stephen Hawking

Astronomy...

Almost anything by Carl Sagan or Patrick Moore.

Moore was an amateur astronomer, and his books tend to focus on observation, and ways for an amateur to make a real scientific contribution. His specialist subject was the Solar System.

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