Secular Student Alliance
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24-09-2017, 09:13 PM
Secular Student Alliance
Good news for me! Next year I will be going to a public university and joining their Secular Student Alliance. I'm excited to make some new Atheist friends.
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24-09-2017, 09:20 PM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
(24-09-2017 09:13 PM)goldenarm Wrote:  Good news for me! Next year I will be going to a public university and joining their Secular Student Alliance. I'm excited to make some new Atheist friends.

I don't live in US but Australia but I'm curious - what is public university and how does it differ from others?
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24-09-2017, 09:25 PM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
(24-09-2017 09:20 PM)Thinker Wrote:  
(24-09-2017 09:13 PM)goldenarm Wrote:  Good news for me! Next year I will be going to a public university and joining their Secular Student Alliance. I'm excited to make some new Atheist friends.

I don't live in US but Australia but I'm curious - what is public university and how does it differ from others?

A public university is mainly funded by the government. Private colleges are funded privately, and they're generally smaller.

A private school can set up it's own rules and policies. For example, private schools can have a religious denomination.
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24-09-2017, 09:27 PM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
(24-09-2017 09:20 PM)Thinker Wrote:  
(24-09-2017 09:13 PM)goldenarm Wrote:  Good news for me! Next year I will be going to a public university and joining their Secular Student Alliance. I'm excited to make some new Atheist friends.

I don't live in US but Australia but I'm curious - what is public university and how does it differ from others?

Well, here. Let me Google that for you. Click HERE to find out what a public university is.
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25-09-2017, 05:06 AM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
That's great! Smile

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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26-09-2017, 03:47 PM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
(24-09-2017 09:25 PM)goldenarm Wrote:  
(24-09-2017 09:20 PM)Thinker Wrote:  I don't live in US but Australia but I'm curious - what is public university and how does it differ from others?

A public university is mainly funded by the government. Private colleges are funded privately, and they're generally smaller.

A private school can set up it's own rules and policies. For example, private schools can have a religious denomination.
In the US, private universities tend to be pricier, and harder to get into. State universities usually offer particularly low rates for students who are established residents of that state. For any given state, x, University of x or x State University is generally where residents of x get the least expensive education. At the same time, it's not got a rep for being an inferior education, either. State universities are pretty decent.

Private universities, with the so-called Ivy League at the top, are arguably more prestigious to have a degree from, if you can afford them. Annual tuition at Cornell for example is about $50K, maybe $65K with room and board. Grants and scholarships can put a dent in that, but rich parents are usually pretty much a requirement to attend such places -- that, or the willingness to take on (and the ability to qualify for) truly massive student debt. At the other extreme, if you live with your parents close enough to one of the State University of New York (SUNY) campuses, you can attend for as little as $15K per year. And starting this year, if you're a New York resident and your parents earn less than $100K per year, you can get a scholarship to attend basically for free, although I think there's some weird requirement that you have to live and work in the state for at least a few years after getting your degree or else it's converted to a loan and there are other restrictions, like you have to be a first-time student and attend full-time. Also you can't use it for a graduate degree. So far as I know, that program, or getting a full-ride scholarship because of really good academic performance in high school, is the closest thing we've got to free college in this country.
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26-09-2017, 04:54 PM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
(26-09-2017 03:47 PM)mordant Wrote:  In the US, private universities tend to be pricier, and harder to get into. State universities usually offer particularly low rates for students who are established residents of that state. For any given state, x, University of x or x State University is generally where residents of x get the least expensive education. At the same time, it's not got a rep for being an inferior education, either. State universities are pretty decent.

Agreed. I live in the area with Duke University, North Carolina State University ("State"), and University of North Carolina ("Carolina"). At UNC, they have a guy named Bart Ehrman that a few may have heard of.

Zach Galifianakis went to State, but he's probably not a good example. I'm also near East Carolina University, but that's known here for parties and Sandra Bullock.
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26-09-2017, 05:09 PM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
(26-09-2017 03:47 PM)mordant Wrote:  Private universities, with the so-called Ivy League at the top, are arguably more prestigious to have a degree from, if you can afford them. Annual tuition at Cornell for example is about $50K, maybe $65K with room and board. Grants and scholarships can put a dent in that, but rich parents are usually pretty much a requirement to attend such places -- that, or the willingness to take on (and the ability to qualify for) truly massive student debt.

Or if you're L. that I grew up with (and was always asking my mom's church for money to go on trips overseas relating to her field, with Christian groups related to it), you convert to Judaism and your father-in-law pays off your substantial student loans from your Ivy.

Anyhow, seconding all you said. I went public the whole way through, but know people who did the private route for their Bachelors and Masters, only to fail out at the PhD level in a public university with six figures of student loan debt, most of it from their time in private institutions.

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26-09-2017, 06:09 PM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
(26-09-2017 05:09 PM)Shai Hulud Wrote:  
(26-09-2017 03:47 PM)mordant Wrote:  Private universities, with the so-called Ivy League at the top, are arguably more prestigious to have a degree from, if you can afford them. Annual tuition at Cornell for example is about $50K, maybe $65K with room and board. Grants and scholarships can put a dent in that, but rich parents are usually pretty much a requirement to attend such places -- that, or the willingness to take on (and the ability to qualify for) truly massive student debt.

Or if you're L. that I grew up with (and was always asking my mom's church for money to go on trips overseas relating to her field, with Christian groups related to it), you convert to Judaism and your father-in-law pays off your substantial student loans from your Ivy.

Anyhow, seconding all you said. I went public the whole way through, but know people who did the private route for their Bachelors and Masters, only to fail out at the PhD level in a public university with six figures of student loan debt, most of it from their time in private institutions.

It's really sad what's happened to college costs and how much financial aid sucks. I went to one of the most expensive private colleges in the country in the '80s. Cost my father $1000/year, or $4000 total, and my total student loan debt after four years was $8500. The four-year total, $12,500, is less than what we are paying for my son to attend UMass PER SEMESTER. Weeping

I have no idea how pretty much anyone outside of the 1%ers can afford a private school these days.
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26-09-2017, 07:07 PM
RE: Secular Student Alliance
(26-09-2017 06:09 PM)julep Wrote:  
(26-09-2017 05:09 PM)Shai Hulud Wrote:  Or if you're L. that I grew up with (and was always asking my mom's church for money to go on trips overseas relating to her field, with Christian groups related to it), you convert to Judaism and your father-in-law pays off your substantial student loans from your Ivy.

Anyhow, seconding all you said. I went public the whole way through, but know people who did the private route for their Bachelors and Masters, only to fail out at the PhD level in a public university with six figures of student loan debt, most of it from their time in private institutions.

It's really sad what's happened to college costs and how much financial aid sucks. I went to one of the most expensive private colleges in the country in the '80s. Cost my father $1000/year, or $4000 total, and my total student loan debt after four years was $8500. The four-year total, $12,500, is less than what we are paying for my son to attend UMass PER SEMESTER. Weeping

I have no idea how pretty much anyone outside of the 1%ers can afford a private school these days.

Holy cow that's amazing!! Like my mind was boggled as I read that. :/ My students pay about 6k a year for their state school in tuition (probably another 3k in room and board for those who live on campus, but we're mostly commuter). Meanwhile, the private (Methodist, I think) university in the city is around 40k a year.

Though for a similar story to yours...my mom went to a private Baptist university back in the 1970s. The first time we bought books when I did dual-enrollment classes in high school for college credit, we spent more on new textbooks (we learned that day to buy used), than her parents spent on tuition in a semester at her private school.

Also total apologies Goldenarm, we are not trying to make college sound scary, if we are. Sad Rather amazed we don't have an SSA here.

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