Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
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02-03-2017, 02:03 AM (This post was last modified: 02-03-2017 02:09 AM by EvolutionKills.)
Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
I love cats, and I grew up with them. But ever since I left my mother's home, I haven't had a cat. My younger brother got a cat once he and his wife moved into their own place, and now that I'm relatively comfortable and settled as well, I've been toying around with getting a cat of my own.

For background, I currently share a trailer home with my roommate. He's a good friend of mine, practically family at this point. Technically we're not allowed to have cats or dogs, but I've seen cats in the windowsills of other homes in the park, so it's kind of an open secret that the ban on cats isn't really enforced (not like they're barking and bothering the neighbors, plus any damage is to our home, we just rent the plot itself). My roommate also used to share the place with people who did have a cat there, so he's had them before. I work full time night shift, so I'm at work between 11pm and 7am most nights, and i come home and enjoy my mornings and afternoons; I typically sleep between 4pm and 10pm. My roommate works full time as well, and he's usually gone by 8am, and typically home by 6pm. As far as people go, we practically have all day coverage; there is little time when both of us are not home.

So yeah, an entire home shared by two bachelors. I miss having a cat, and I'm now seriously considering getting one. The local shelter has adoptions available through the local Pet Supply Plus and Pets Mart. The going rate for a 6 month to 7 year old, completed with FVRCP vaccine, rabies, spay/neuter, flea preventative, deworming treatment and discounted wellness visit, is $55. I was looking at their listings, and I'd like to get a older, more mellow cat. I grew up with long hairs (Persians), but I don't envy brushing them and all the hair they leave everywhere, so I'm probably going to go with a short hair. Plus my brother's cats are both short hairs and I really like them.

I did spend years living with, and taking care of, the fickle bastards. I already have a plan for a cheap litter box (take a large, $20 storage tote with a lid, cut a sizable U shape out of one end to let the cat in, fill with litter and done). Keeping up with food and liter won't be an issue. But I'm curios as to practically everything else. What are the other ancillary costs of owning a cat? How often are visits to the vet needed/expected, and what do they typically run? Anything else I should be particularly worried about when it comes to picking a cat outside of the obvious (e.g. flat faced cats and dogs are prone to nasal complications)? Tips for acclimating a new cat? What should I look out for to make my place more cat friendly? Tips for scratching posts and the like (my brother's cats really like that Scratch Lounge glorified cardboard box).

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^ His cats fucking love this thing. ^

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02-03-2017, 02:38 AM
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
I adopted a cat in Jan. Ours is a 1-y-o female who had had a litter of kittens (kittens were all adopted out seperately). I've heard that if getting a female it's better to get one that has had a litter but not sure if true or why. As I'm in the UK I won't bother saying prices.

We have tic preventative treatments over here too, but not rabies.

Annual vaccination boosters.

Flea/tic/worming either monthly or quarterly depending on the brand used.

Pet insurance.

Our vet does a 'cat' plan which includes all treatments including boosters (plus discounts on treatment/food) for a fixed monthly amount so owners can spread the cost and more likely to keep up with the treatments.

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02-03-2017, 04:03 AM
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
Well Tartarus is already taken so.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
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02-03-2017, 04:07 AM
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
(02-03-2017 04:03 AM)JDog554 Wrote:  Well Tartarus is already taken so.

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02-03-2017, 05:16 AM
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
We "adopted" two cats around 25 years ago, and they were a source of continual joy and friendship (they've both gone to the big cattery in the sky now LOL.)

One, Maxine, was a stray that had been dumped in a paddock near our friends farmland, and the other, Sheba, we rescued from a council animal shelter. They got on like a house on fire, and were the best of lifetime buddies.

If your living environment allows for it—even on the QT—I'd go for it. You'll have a furry friend for years to come. Smile

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02-03-2017, 05:53 AM
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
My flatmates got a ragdoll cat (the same breed as the one in the picture).
It's fucking adorable. It sits on top of the microwave and watches me cook lunch and eats raw spaghetti pasta I give it.
I missed having pets in my life too. I'm glad they got him. Defiantly got for it man, they're not that hard to keep alive. Though, if you can get away with defiantly get a dog over a cat. Dogs > cats.

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02-03-2017, 06:24 AM
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
Every cat I've ever had was a rescue save one, a Persian given to me as a present.

The four we have now are family.
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02-03-2017, 06:36 AM
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
My husband and I have had 5 cats over the span of 30 years. Our last one recently "left for college" a few months ago so now we are empty nesters. It's been a nice break from the litter, cat hair etc. We definitely miss having them though. Two out of the 5 were females and even though they were fixed they sprayed. It was very frustrating! I will not get a female next time. That would be my only caution.
I would recommend searching the internet for how to choose a cat. There are many good informative sites. Also, there are sites that tell you how much it will cost. Not just vets but the food can get pricey. I definitely recommend premium food without added coloring. Believe me it makes a BIG difference in the litter box! Also, I personally would go with short hair. With long hairs, you have more maintenance especially as they get older. You have to keep mats out of their fur plus if they have any stomach upsets and can't clean their bottoms then you have nasty fur you have to deal with.
Good luck in your search! Even with the cost it is so worth having a cat that chooses to love you back.
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02-03-2017, 06:43 AM
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
My cat is a rescue. I have had him a little over three years, he was a tiny kitten when I got him.

As for vet costs, they can vary a lot depending on where you go - do NOT use a vet in store...such as the ones in PetSmart. We have a great vet clinic we use for the critters here. The big benefit being that the staff is stable - some have been there for the ten years we have used them and they do after hours calls for emergencies. A healthy cat shouldn't need more than an exam and shots once a year. Part of the adoption with Blue included being able to have him fixed as part of the adoption fee.

Use good litter, feed good quality food and treats and you shouldn't have any problems. Blue loves to be brushed which makes a big impact on the amount of fur scattered around the house.

Blue uses a scratching post and we have had no damage from scratching elsewhere. It's tall enough so that he can stretch to reach the top of it. Now and then I spice it up with some catnip as a treat.

My niece volunteers for a cat rescue in the Chicago area and my sister has adopted adult cats from there. My cousin fosters cats (and dogs) in VA and currently has one that just gave birth to five kittens.

Good luck, hope you find one that chooses you. Smile

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02-03-2017, 06:43 AM (This post was last modified: 02-03-2017 06:46 AM by yakherder.)
RE: Seriously Considering Cat Adoption
Love dogs too but I'm definitely a cat person, so to speak.

The land owners are probably more worried about strays breeding out of control than they are about the cats actually in your house since it falls on them to deal with it. When I first moved to Canada we were in a similar setup temporarily, and while there I ended up "adopting" two stray kittens about a year apart. They both came with a belly full of worms and needed a full set of vaccinations, neutering, etc. One of the two somehow (the vet requested permission to submit the case to the university, still don't know exactly what happened) suffered minor brain damage during the surgery and had to relearn some basic cognitive functions, such as walking in a straight line and maintaining the balance to run without tipping over. Nonetheless, despite its rough beginning, after that initial onslaught of minor expenses neither cat has had to see the vet for anything. Food and cat litter are about the only expenses. Neither has ever even shit on the floor, not once. At 3 weeks old, they already knew the box was where to go.

From past experiences, I could only warn that one thing common to most breeds is being prone to bladder and urinary tract issues. Cats are uniquely evolved to survive in low water environments, and that's the downside to the adaptations they've carried with them I guess.

Our pug, on the other hand, is up to about $600 per month in prescriptions and specialized anti allergy food.

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