Share your de-conversion story
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19-05-2017, 07:32 AM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
(19-05-2017 07:00 AM)BeccaBoo Wrote:  Realised Joseph Smith wasn't a prophet, left the church, and am sorry for opposing same-sex marriage.

Yours was an interesting story for me to read, since I have had little exposure to Mormon perspectives (just a bit over in the Amazon atheist forum before I placed someone on ignore, since I couldn't relate to them).

Progress is measured from the point where you start. It took me until I was 50 to work through all of my own religious assumptions.

It's always good to hear that someone understood something from long conversations. These internet discussions do have certain impacts over time.
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19-05-2017, 08:07 AM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
(19-05-2017 07:32 AM)Thoreauvian Wrote:  
(19-05-2017 07:00 AM)BeccaBoo Wrote:  Realised Joseph Smith wasn't a prophet, left the church, and am sorry for opposing same-sex marriage.

Yours was an interesting story for me to read, since I have had little exposure to Mormon perspectives (just a bit over in the Amazon atheist forum before I placed someone on ignore, since I couldn't relate to them).

Progress is measured from the point where you start. It took me until I was 50 to work through all of my own religious assumptions.

It's always good to hear that someone understood something from long conversations. These internet discussions do have certain impacts over time.

That's encouraging, thank you.

Speaking to people on the internet has helped me for years to develop my rationality, also maintain my sanity! I was a very serious student, and then missed academics when I became a full-time mother.

I agree, there is a whole bunch of unpacking of assumptions to do. I just started, at least from this side of the bubble, but I remembered this forum and that there was good stuff here.
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19-05-2017, 09:55 AM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
(19-05-2017 08:07 AM)BeccaBoo Wrote:  Speaking to people on the internet has helped me for years to develop my rationality, also maintain my sanity! I was a very serious student, and then missed academics when I became a full-time mother.

I agree, there is a whole bunch of unpacking of assumptions to do. I just started, at least from this side of the bubble, but I remembered this forum and that there was good stuff here.

I am impressed on almost a daily basis by the wealth of insights and information available from a remarkable number of contributors to this forum. Of course, there's also all the rancor to wade through, but I guess that's the price of admission.
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22-05-2017, 09:03 AM (This post was last modified: 22-05-2017 09:54 AM by tempogain.)
RE: Share your de-conversion story
Kind of a boring story here. Never questioned much if anything through 8 years of Catholic elementary school. Read my catechism and passed my tests. The good Jesuits at my high school set me straight (though that was not their intent lol.) My sophomore biblical exegesis class was one eye-opener. This stuff was edited, and re-edited, and translated, etc etc. Having my mind expanded in various other ways probably didn't hurt. I walked out of school a deist and thought about religion very little afterward. Maybe eight years later I got into a rare related conversation in a bar. Not sure quite about what, but I opined that there "must be a creator". The guy looked at me disdainfully and asked, "Who created the creator?" I quickly said "I guess you're right" and have called myself an atheist since. The guy looked a bit disappointed I remember. I still haven't heard a good answer to that question.
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23-05-2017, 03:30 AM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
(22-05-2017 09:03 AM)tempogain Wrote:  Kind of a boring story here. Never questioned much if anything through 8 years of Catholic elementary school. Read my catechism and passed my tests. The good Jesuits at my high school set me straight (though that was not their intent lol.) My sophomore biblical exegesis class was one eye-opener. This stuff was edited, and re-edited, and translated, etc etc. Having my mind expanded in various other ways probably didn't hurt. I walked out of school a deist and thought about religion very little afterward. Maybe eight years later I got into a rare related conversation in a bar. Not sure quite about what, but I opined that there "must be a creator". The guy looked at me disdainfully and asked, "Who created the creator?" I quickly said "I guess you're right" and have called myself an atheist since. The guy looked a bit disappointed I remember. I still haven't heard a good answer to that question.

My younger son asked me that repeatedly when he was 9 years old or so.
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23-05-2017, 08:29 AM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
(23-05-2017 03:30 AM)BeccaBoo Wrote:  My younger son asked me that repeatedly when he was 9 years old or so.

Kids are smarter than they used to be I guess Smile How did you answer him? We were pretty typical Catholics. I don't think I ever talked to my parents about religion. Church on Sunday and not a big deal if missed. My grandma was a full-on born-again nut so that might have been enough for everybody.
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23-05-2017, 09:32 AM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
(23-05-2017 08:29 AM)tempogain Wrote:  
(23-05-2017 03:30 AM)BeccaBoo Wrote:  My younger son asked me that repeatedly when he was 9 years old or so.

Kids are smarter than they used to be I guess Smile How did you answer him? We were pretty typical Catholics. I don't think I ever talked to my parents about religion. Church on Sunday and not a big deal if missed. My grandma was a full-on born-again nut so that might have been enough for everybody.

I'd say we have a similar conundrum with the Big Bang, and we would talk about imaginable theories.
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25-05-2017, 06:25 PM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
My mom told me I was going to hell for seeing nothing wrong with my gay friends. I started to question things, like was I good person because I was taught to be nice to those around me, or because religion told me too. I realized soon after I was nice to people because they are human like me.

I started to search up things, at first just to give myself comfort that I wasn't going to Hell. With why gay people aren't going to Hell and such.

Then I started to watch a guy called Dusty Smith, The Cult of Dusty. And his videos made me realize all along I never did believe in God. It's like I went through the motions of church, pray, and thinking he was there. But yet, the way I lived was nothing like how my parents did. I didn't think as they did, I didn't see a reason to be conservative when the facts were laid in front of him.

I never heard what Atheist was until that month I went into depression. Because in order to got to heaven i had to go against what I thought was right. I had to be mean to those who stood up for me when i was bullied. For those who befriended me even though I was the outcast kid no one wanted. And I'll be honest, it hurt to think these nice people were going to Hell, and I didn't want to tell them that and be a bully myself.

That's how I turned away from religion.

"Governments don't want well informed, well educated people capable of critical thinking That is against their interests.
They want obedient workers people who are just smart enough to run the machines and do the paperwork And just dumb enough to passively accept it."

- George Carlin
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01-06-2017, 11:01 AM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
My deconversion was gradual. Since I was a child, I've always been interested in science. I grew up fishing and camping, loving all things "outdoorsy". Naturally, my favorite subject in school was science, specifically biology. (But I can't stand chemistry, lol)

My first two years of college was spent as a zoology major, taking courses like comparative vertebrate anatomy, botany, ecology, etc... Although I ended up changing my major to my other passion, fine arts, I continued, and still continue, to educate myself in the sciences.

The more and more I learned about these topics, the harder and harder it was to reconcile my faith. I eventually stopped calling myself a Christian in my 20s and mostly avoided religious discussions. In my mind, I still considered a god a possibility, so I started calling myself an agnostic. Then when I started learning more about logic and skepticism and learned the difference between agnosticism and atheism I came to realize I truly was an atheist. Though, I can't really pin down exactly when that happened. I may have never truly believed in God.
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17-08-2017, 12:43 PM
RE: Share your de-conversion story
(10-06-2013 08:35 PM)Hughsie Wrote:  It's been suggested that we have a stickied thread for everyone to post their de-conversion stories in and I think it's a fantastic idea, so here it is.

My own de-conversion was rather boring. I gradually realised it was all bullshit, didn't have a big coming out moment but my family became aware, some of them were disappointed while others weren't bothered, there's the odd argument about religion in my house but nothing major.

I know others here have far more interesting stories though so please, begin sharing.

I dunno, that's quite interesting...lol...

What I would be more interested in, however, is how people got religious in the first place. I went to Sunday school as a child and heard all about Jesus, his birth, youth, baptism, preaching in Judea, Sermon on the Mount, the Beatitudes, lots of parables, walking on water, healing the sick, feeding the six hundred, betrayal, crucifixion and resurrection. When it came to the crucifixion I quit going to Sunday school because I found it to be unbelievable, along with the walking on water business.

However, the rest of it was, in the main, a plausible account of a historical figure so I didn't really question whether that part was true, and the morality of it seemed to be right, that you should be "nice" to people.

Of course, I had seen images in cathedrals and elsewhere of "God" portrayed as a big white man floating in the sky, half naked with a white sheet draped over his body with big muscular legs, white hair and beard and I suppose someone might have said to me that he "created" the world etc. I never thought much about that aspect of religion or addressed the idea that this guy had the wherewithal to make the whole universe so when I stopped going to church, for the most part, I didn't give it any more thought than I gave to Santa Claus coming down our "chimney", which was a gas heater with a 4 inch exhaust pipe. It wasn't ever anything I gave any credence to.

Later, I would meet people who would ask if I "believed" in God and all that but tried to avoid any dialogue with them. I would tend to say "not really" and make for the nearest door.

So, how does one come to believe in a big white guy with a beard making the whole universe? What mental process does one go through to get into the belief that this character could make anything with no tools, no materials, no work bench? What exactly is it that one "believes" happened? What is it that they believe? A magic trick? Did he wiggle his nose like Samantha on Bewitched? If someone says that Santa lands on the roof of every house in the world, you know it's impossible because it's just physically impossible and you know that reindeers can't fly etc etc.

When you de-convert, what is it that you are de-converting from and why did you believe it in the first place, and what did you believe, because I can't conceive of believing in something which is not explained, anymore than how the Easter bunny gets hold of chocolate eggs or how Mickey Mouse walks and talks. Surely this is a mental problem of people who can't distinguish between reality and make believe?
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