Shark teeth fossils
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13-05-2011, 01:31 AM
Shark teeth fossils
Somewhere around N 51°17,900, E004°23,445 there is a spoil heap of dried out dredging material of the nearby river Schelde. The mounts contain million years old river sediments and salt water deposits shaken and stirred by the tides ever since the last ice age formed "schelde" as we know it now. A treasure-cove witch the dredgers where so kind to dig up.
Just a few hours of almost effortless sifting trough the loose light-greyish sand gives you (a nice tan and) fossilised seashells and shark teeth.
[Image: 5644064.gif]
Its incredible that these things are still horribly sharp and can cut through paper. Note how they are bended backwards and how the first has small barbs. Holding such piece of million years old history is just breathtaking.

"Although humans are in the best of positions to understand the past and protect nature,
They turned out to be the worst predator and it's worst enemy."
(Bill Bryson - A Short History of Nearly Everything)

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13-05-2011, 01:43 AM
 
RE: Shark teeth fossils
That's awesome.
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13-05-2011, 08:23 AM
RE: Shark teeth fossils
Well now I want to know who they belonged to. They're millions of years old? And if you found them all together that means they are probably contemporaries. I found it pretty cool how they are all different. Some curve back more than other, then there's size, the long/narrow and short/thick. I know that sharks haven't evolved much, but that's relative to other species changing. I think the variety is fascinating.

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13-05-2011, 08:58 AM
RE: Shark teeth fossils
(13-05-2011 08:23 AM)ashley.hunt60 Wrote:  Well now I want to know who they belonged to. They're millions of years old? And if you found them all together that means they are probably contemporaries. I found it pretty cool how they are all different. Some curve back more than other, then there's size, the long/narrow and short/thick. I know that sharks haven't evolved much, but that's relative to other species changing. I think the variety is fascinating.

There can also be ontogenetic variation. I.E. adolescents look different than adults. At least two look like they could be the same species (not a vert paleo person so I am just guessing).

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13-05-2011, 10:01 AM
RE: Shark teeth fossils
Any Carcharodon Megalodon teeth in there?

I love collecting those.

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13-05-2011, 10:07 AM
RE: Shark teeth fossils
(13-05-2011 10:01 AM)Bezo Wrote:  Any Carcharodon Megalodon teeth in there?

I love collecting those.

These look way to small Meglaodon.

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13-05-2011, 10:09 AM
RE: Shark teeth fossils
Last one on the end could be. Not one of the front teeth, obviously. Probably not though.

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13-05-2011, 10:14 AM
 
RE: Shark teeth fossils
I can make it easy for you. If you venture to Venice Beach Florida, you'll see most everyone bent at the waist walking the break line as the waves crash in, because with every wave there arrives huge amounts of prehistoric shark teeth. They're literally everywhere you look in the sand.

And if you enjoy collecting Megalodon teeth, which I would too, you stand to maybe find one there. However, for sure it's said they're on the drop off beneath the Venice beach pier, at the end where a bar named "Skarky's On The Pier" resides. However, one doesn't want to venture there without warning, as there are some very aggressive sharks in the water that may want to collect your teeth in return. [Image: Animal_Shark.gif] Tongue

I have a huge collection of prehistoric shark teeth, thanks to my time living in Tampa Florida and visiting Venice most every other weekend. Smile
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14-05-2011, 12:14 AM
RE: Shark teeth fossils
Dunkleosteus is way cooler than megalodon!

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14-05-2011, 08:22 AM
RE: Shark teeth fossils
(14-05-2011 12:14 AM)daemonowner Wrote:   Dunkleosteus is way cooler than megalodon!

I love the placoderms!!!!

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