Shots fired in Dallas during protest.
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12-07-2016, 08:24 PM
RE: Shots fired in Dallas during protest.
(11-07-2016 07:33 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  
(11-07-2016 02:24 PM)Gilgamesh Wrote:  Implication can only be perceived; not given.

Forgive my pedantry, but implication is given; inference is taken.

/petpeeveitis

Incorrect. Both are taken.
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12-07-2016, 08:51 PM
RE: Shots fired in Dallas during protest.
(12-07-2016 08:24 PM)Gilgamesh Wrote:  
(11-07-2016 07:33 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  Forgive my pedantry, but implication is given; inference is taken.

/petpeeveitis

Incorrect. Both are taken.

You are wrong. I infer something from what you say; you imply something by what you say.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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12-07-2016, 09:23 PM
RE: Shots fired in Dallas during protest.
(12-07-2016 01:02 PM)Vosur Wrote:  
(11-07-2016 07:33 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  Forgive my pedantry, but implication is given; inference is taken.

/petpeeveitis
Well well well, look who's being a pedant now... Tongue

I'm usually tolerant even concerning sloppy language, but goddamnit, this is one bugbear I can't stand seeing. There are a couple of other wrong usages which drive me to lecturing ... thankfully, not many.
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12-07-2016, 09:26 PM
RE: Shots fired in Dallas during protest.
(12-07-2016 08:24 PM)Gilgamesh Wrote:  
(11-07-2016 07:33 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  Forgive my pedantry, but implication is given; inference is taken.

/petpeeveitis

Incorrect. Both are taken.

I will give you a proper reference when I get home on my laptop.

Alternatively, you could link to your source? I'm happy to admit error if I'm wrong.
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13-07-2016, 01:02 AM
RE: Shots fired in Dallas during protest.
(12-07-2016 09:26 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  
(12-07-2016 08:24 PM)Gilgamesh Wrote:  Incorrect. Both are taken.

I will give you a proper reference when I get home on my laptop.

Alternatively, you could link to your source? I'm happy to admit error if I'm wrong.

From the Oxford English Dictionary, both definitions and their accompanying commentary. I have removed extraneous links (synonyms, examples, etc):

Quote:Imply

VERB (implies, implying, implied)

[WITH OBJECT]
1 Strongly suggest the truth or existence of (something not expressly stated)

1.1 (Of a fact or occurrence) suggest (something) as a logical consequence

Usage

Imply and infer do not mean the same thing and should not be used interchangeably: see infer (usage).

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/def...lish/imply

You'll note in both denotations the use of the word "suggest", which is an active verb -- meaning, in this context, that the active speaker is passing along the thought.

From the same dictionary:

Quote:Infer

VERB (infers, inferring, inferred)

[WITH OBJECT]
Deduce or conclude (information) from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements

Usage

There is a distinction in meaning between infer and imply. In the sentence the speaker implied that the general had been a traitor [italics in original -- Thump], the word implied means that something in the speaker’s words ‘suggested’ that this man was a traitor (although nothing so explicit was actually stated). However, in we inferred from his words that the general had been a traitor [again, italics in orginal], the word inferred means that something in the speaker’s words enabled the listeners to ‘deduce’ that the man was a traitor. The two words infer and imply can describe the same event, but from different angles. Mistakes occur when infer is used to mean imply, as in are you inferring that I’m a liar? [original] (instead of are you implying that I’m a liar?).

[Bolding added by me -- Thump]

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/def...lish/infer
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15-07-2016, 08:46 AM
RE: Shots fired in Dallas during protest.
LOL... quoting yourself now?

(13-07-2016 01:02 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  
(12-07-2016 09:26 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  I will give you a proper reference when I get home on my laptop.

Alternatively, you could link to your source? I'm happy to admit error if I'm wrong.

From the Oxford English Dictionary, both definitions and their accompanying commentary. I have removed extraneous links (synonyms, examples, etc):

Quote:Imply

VERB (implies, implying, implied)

[WITH OBJECT]
1 Strongly suggest the truth or existence of (something not expressly stated)

1.1 (Of a fact or occurrence) suggest (something) as a logical consequence

Usage

Imply and infer do not mean the same thing and should not be used interchangeably: see infer (usage).

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/def...lish/imply

You'll note in both denotations the use of the word "suggest", which is an active verb -- meaning, in this context, that the active speaker is passing along the thought.

From the same dictionary:

Quote:Infer

VERB (infers, inferring, inferred)

[WITH OBJECT]
Deduce or conclude (information) from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements

Usage

There is a distinction in meaning between infer and imply. In the sentence the speaker implied that the general had been a traitor [italics in original -- Thump], the word implied means that something in the speaker’s words ‘suggested’ that this man was a traitor (although nothing so explicit was actually stated). However, in we inferred from his words that the general had been a traitor [again, italics in orginal], the word inferred means that something in the speaker’s words enabled the listeners to ‘deduce’ that the man was a traitor. The two words infer and imply can describe the same event, but from different angles. Mistakes occur when infer is used to mean imply, as in are you inferring that I’m a liar? [original] (instead of are you implying that I’m a liar?).

[Bolding added by me -- Thump]

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/def...lish/infer

... and I'm sure we all appreciate you totally derailing this thread with multiple, inconsequential and irrelevant comments about minor grammatical differences. Well done! Big Grin

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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