Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
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22-04-2014, 07:30 PM
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
(22-04-2014 06:44 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(22-04-2014 06:36 PM)worldatheist2 Wrote:  I am 17 and I became atheist last year. I am also having an eagle scout board of review within the next few months. At by board of review they will, assuming that I am still catholic, ask me how I plan to follow my religion when I go off to college and become an adult. When they ask this, I want to say
"I do not find any credible evidence for the existence of a god, so I do not plan to live with any religion in the future. I do not plan to go to church, nor pray. However, i plan to continue doing community service and try to contribute positively to the world by being kind to people when I am angry at them and by standing up for my beliefs."
If I said this, I would likely fail my board of review and have to explain to my parents why. They would be absolutely furious, and they would have to explain to all of my relatives that I was not going to be an eagle scout because I had claimed to be an atheist at my court of honor. This would provide much hurt and sadness for me in the short term, but in the long term I would be proud of standing up for my beliefs.
However, I am not that brave. I will probably make up a bunch of lies about how I was going to keep going to church weekly, yadda yadda.
In your opinion, what is the best course of action?

If they ask, you could say that you are not sure how as you are having some doubt about faith. And don't say any more.

I am not having "some doubts to my faith" I went through that phase in summer 2012. I went through an agnostic phase when I had serious doubts in fall 2012 and winter-spring 2013. I was an atheist scared into religion by Pascal's Wager for summer-fall 2013. I became an atheist last November 26 (three days before my confirmation retreat... the worst weekend of my life)

That is a typical story for a person who transitioned from christian to atheist. I am not having some doubts. i am an atheist. I can defend my worldview well, and I do not believe faith is a virtue. Instead, it is a weakness.
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22-04-2014, 07:31 PM
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
(22-04-2014 07:16 PM)worldatheist2 Wrote:  
(22-04-2014 06:56 PM)=jesse= Wrote:  If theyd discriminate against you for that, do you really want to wear their badge?

I have put hundreds of hours into this over the last five years. Back when I joined, I was not aware of their discriminatory policies. However, as I have formed opinions about issues over the past few years, I have grown ashamed of being a boy scout. They just last year dropped their ban on gay scouts and still prohibit gay leaders. I am ashamed at being part of a group who stands as a symbol of opponents of gay rights. I am a supporter of gay rights and gay marriage. I also disagree with their atheist ban, which affects me personally. I cannot talk about atheism in the presence of anybody who is in my troop, even at school.
However, I have worked hard and I want to get my badge and get the heck out of that discriminatory, conservative organization.

Tell them that.

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I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
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22-04-2014, 07:46 PM
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
If it's really that important for you to gain the "honor", then yes, you will have to resort to semantics and half truths.

Say something like, "I intend to pursue truth above all else, and to study the faith as it pertains to the past and the present. I will hold myself to a standard of honor and justice, and of humility towards my fellow man."

Or some shit like that. They'll love it and you'll get your badge and you can leave it all behind afterwards.

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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22-04-2014, 08:06 PM
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
Are they gonna let you word play your way through it? What happens if they ask you to clarify?

Sucks if you have to lie about it, but I get it. Youve worked hard for it. When do you have to decide?

The religion of one age, is the literary entertainment of the next.
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22-04-2014, 10:15 PM
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
(22-04-2014 07:30 PM)worldatheist2 Wrote:  
(22-04-2014 06:44 PM)Chas Wrote:  If they ask, you could say that you are not sure how as you are having some doubt about faith. And don't say any more.

I am not having "some doubts to my faith" I went through that phase in summer 2012. I went through an agnostic phase when I had serious doubts in fall 2012 and winter-spring 2013. I was an atheist scared into religion by Pascal's Wager for summer-fall 2013. I became an atheist last November 26 (three days before my confirmation retreat... the worst weekend of my life)

That is a typical story for a person who transitioned from christian to atheist. I am not having some doubts. i am an atheist. I can defend my worldview well, and I do not believe faith is a virtue. Instead, it is a weakness.

Then say so.

Badges? You don't need no stinkin' badges.





Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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23-04-2014, 12:05 AM
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
Why don'tcha tell your parents you don't like the organization and why, and don't go *fail* the damn board of review, just *don't go*. Since you don't support their lil' club, why would a badge mean anything? If anything it'll be a reminder of the time you chose to buckle under...

"I have squandered my resistance
For a pocket full of mumbles
Such are promises"

Sorry if it sounds harsh. These things are kinda meaningless. In 5 years you won't give a shit that you don't have it, and the time passes quickly. If anything you will be able to hold your head up high that you chose to be true to yourself.

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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23-04-2014, 05:27 AM (This post was last modified: 23-04-2014 05:35 AM by Cathym112.)
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
(22-04-2014 07:16 PM)worldatheist2 Wrote:  
(22-04-2014 06:56 PM)=jesse= Wrote:  If theyd discriminate against you for that, do you really want to wear their badge?

I have put hundreds of hours into this over the last five years. Back when I joined, I was not aware of their discriminatory policies. However, as I have formed opinions about issues over the past few years, I have grown ashamed of being a boy scout. They just last year dropped their ban on gay scouts and still prohibit gay leaders. I am ashamed at being part of a group who stands as a symbol of opponents of gay rights. I am a supporter of gay rights and gay marriage. I also disagree with their atheist ban, which affects me personally. I cannot talk about atheism in the presence of anybody who is in my troop, even at school.
However, I have worked hard and I want to get my badge and get the heck out of that discriminatory, conservative organization.

I hear ya. You worked hard. Is this really about the badge or is this about what not completing something you worked hard for will mean to you?

This sounds as ridiculous as you saying that you put 5 years into a relationship and it's no longer working for you. So you want to marry her so that you can get out of it. That's what you are saying. Getting the final badge makes you an official scout. They can revoke your marriage, but you will always have the fact that you obtained it.

For some reason, being a quitter is looked down on. And that's affecting you now.

I worked hard in college and in med school. However, when I realized that being a doctor just wasn't for me, even though I loved science and medicine, I walked away. Why? Because any time I remained after I decided I didn't want to be there is just time (and money) wasted.

I stayed in many relationships long past their expiration date because I didn't want to seem like a quitter. So instead of wasting 5 years, I wasted 7. *mutters to myself* Brilliant Idea, cathym, way to think it through. I still kick myself for this.

What I'm hearing you say is that you no longer want to be apart of this organization. Why waste one more hour of your precious time on something you don't want to be apart of?

Because there is no honor in quitting before you've finished? That's rubbish.

You can still be proud of what you've accomplished without compromising your integrity for it.

Then write an open letter to the organization and tell the local news about it. You want a way into college? That is your essay topic with a copy of the media report. Proving that you are David staring down Goliath is your ticket into Princeton, Brown or any predominantly liberal Ivy League. Ivy leagues look for those who stand out. Leaders, innovators, and strength of integrity for yourself.

Imagine what that would mean for your hard work?

A little rudeness and disrespect can elevate a meaningless interaction to a battle of wills and add drama to an otherwise dull day - Bill Watterson
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23-04-2014, 05:32 AM (This post was last modified: 23-04-2014 05:39 AM by Anjele.)
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
You have gotten some good suggestions as far as what to say.

Being an Eagle Scout is looked at by college admissions as a good thing...commitment to a group, community service, years of dedication. It was one of the things that helped get a friend into Notre Dame.

Pick one the of suggested responses, keep it kind of vague and get what you have worked toward for so long. It can open doors. Not everywhere, but in some places that could be important to you.

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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23-04-2014, 05:37 AM
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
(23-04-2014 05:32 AM)Anjele Wrote:  You have gotten some good suggestions as far as what to say.

Being and Eagle Scout is looked at by college admissions as a good thing...commitment to a group, community service, years of dedication. It was one of the things that helped get a friend into Notre Dame.

Pick one the of suggested responses, keep it kind of vague and get what you have worked toward for so long. It can open doors. Not everywhere, but in some places that could be important to you.

A close friend of mine is the Dean of students at Cornell. Since I know he is up, I asked him. He stated that Cornell looks for those who stand out from the rest. Being an Eagle Scout doesn't make you unique. Cornell would accept someone that stood up to an organization over just another Eagle Scout.

A little rudeness and disrespect can elevate a meaningless interaction to a battle of wills and add drama to an otherwise dull day - Bill Watterson
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23-04-2014, 05:44 AM
RE: Should I tell my eagle scout board of review I am atheist?
(23-04-2014 05:37 AM)Cathym112 Wrote:  
(23-04-2014 05:32 AM)Anjele Wrote:  You have gotten some good suggestions as far as what to say.

Being and Eagle Scout is looked at by college admissions as a good thing...commitment to a group, community service, years of dedication. It was one of the things that helped get a friend into Notre Dame.

Pick one the of suggested responses, keep it kind of vague and get what you have worked toward for so long. It can open doors. Not everywhere, but in some places that could be important to you.

A close friend of mine is the Dean of students at Cornell. Since I know he is up, I asked him. He stated that Cornell looks for those who stand out from the rest. Being an Eagle Scout doesn't make you unique. Cornell would accept someone that stood up to an organization over just another Eagle Scout.

I think its just who you bump into. My former manager was really into Scouts, took kids to hike the Grand Canyon every other year, in the odd years he took them to the national jamboree. He was really involved in scouting. If an eagle scout showed up for a job they would be hired instantly and given the highest pay for that job, and promoted as far as he could.

much in life is opportunity(education), much more is in who you know and have contact with.


"Life is a daring adventure or it is nothing"--Helen Keller
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