Simple Swim tips.
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26-05-2015, 07:53 PM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
In all seriousness, I would try and find an experienced instructor who understands your fear. It could be that you just haven't found the right instructor.
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26-05-2015, 07:58 PM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
(26-05-2015 07:46 PM)evenheathen Wrote:  
(26-05-2015 07:38 PM)Mr Woof Wrote:  Sort of, then I start to panic.

I'll take that as a no. That's the first step. If you can completely relax and keep your body laid out, you'll find that you will float. Try it in shallow water so that there will be no fear of drowning should you start to sink. The trick is to try to keep your chest pointed straight towards the sky. The water will come up to your ears and above them, it will seem as though your face will go below the surface, but if you can relax and let the water hold you, you will float. Chest up, remember that.

The trick to swimming well is to realize and utilize your body's natural buoyancy. Once you are comfortable floating without effort on your back, you can learn how with minimal effort you can stay afloat when not in that position.
Thanks! certainly sounds like something I can work on.
I always though balance was a key factor.
Maybe all that stuff I got from books need not be wasted after all.Thumbsup
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26-05-2015, 08:02 PM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
(26-05-2015 07:46 PM)ClydeLee Wrote:  If you're strong for your age, it sounds like you don't have enough body fat, gotta get that floaty fat boost. I was a scrawny little kid and it took me forever to try to learn to swim because everything I would do would still not be enough to keep me afloat.
Does that mean more Maccas?
Bit of belly fat there for flotationYes......but not a six packNo
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26-05-2015, 08:10 PM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
(26-05-2015 07:58 PM)Mr Woof Wrote:  Thanks! certainly sounds like something I can work on.
I always though balance was a key factor.
Maybe all that stuff I got from books need not be wasted after all.Thumbsup

I'm not entirely sure that "balance" would be the correct term, but perhaps something along those lines. One thing to keep in mind is how much force you can create with simple hand and leg movements to push your body in whatever direction you need to. Using the confidence you can gain from realizing how much buoyancy you naturally have will aid you in being able to keep afloat with minimal effort.

When I was a teen and trained for lifeguard duty we had to tread water while holding bricks, after retrieving them from the bottom of the deep end of the pool. The bricks definitely made it tough, but not impossible by any means.

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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26-05-2015, 08:23 PM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
Cant wait to start practising again... but onlu up to my chest.Wink
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26-05-2015, 10:45 PM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
My suggestion is to ascend from victimhood to savour. O.k. so...this might be a bit of reverse psychology here but once you become confident that you yourself can save someone else from drowning, you no longer worry that you will be the one drowning. (This has been in my bio ever since I've joined here, kind of meant for various metaphors, but no one has ever noticed/called me out on it.)

'How To Save A Drowning Man' by Alexander Merffert copyright, 1902, by The Outing Publishing company.
"Most of the drownings that occur about the bathing places result from lack of nerve or cool-headed courage. If swimmers could be trained to keep cool under all circumstances there would be comparatively little drowning among bathers and summer pleasure seekers. Cramp is usually assigned as the cause when some good swimmer drowns. But cramp ought in reality to be nothing serious. Usually it affects only an arm or a leg, or, may be, only a hand or foot. Any moderately good swimmer can keep afloat with one arm, or even without the use of that; yet good swimmers are drowning every week as a result of cramp. If such fatalities were analyzed they would be more properly classed as drownings from fright and loss of nerve. This comes from the fact that everyone is taught in childhood to fear the water, and comes as a grown man and a swimmer to fear the cramp.

The average opinion is that the man who is attacked when swimming in deep water is as good as drowned. Therefore, when a swimmer feels a leg or arm begin to cramp he is frightened, in most cases, entirely out of his wits. He loses his head, begins to splash and paw and struggle, and then goes down. What the swimmer should remember is that he can keep afloat with very, very little effort if he will turn on his back and keep his chest inflated. It is the simple matter of floating, which every swimmer knows and finds very easy. If the swimmer will keep cool and float, the cramping limb will frequently relax after a little and he will find himself as well as ever.

At every summer resort and every country village which has a lake we hear more or less frequently of double drownings, in which the drowning man has seized his would-be rescuer and pulled him under. This is because the average swimmer does not know how to approach a man in trouble. He has read of rescues in cheap novels, and in these the hero invariably plunges in, seizes the drowning man, and, taking him on his back, swims ashore, landing the rescued but little the worse for wear. Some one sees a swimmer drowning, goes for him in this way, is grabbed about the neck and pulled under, to drown with the man he would save. The would-be lifesaver must know something of how drowning occurs and of how drowning men act. There are two chief causes of drowning. Either a swimmer is taken with cramp, as a result of going into the water overheated, swimming with a stomach full of undigested food, or from staying too long in the water and becoming chilled; or else some one falls into the water, or what amounts to the same thing, ventures beyond his depth. Now notice how he acts. He begins to struggle in a frantic way and sinks, takes a mouthful of water into his lungs, rises crazy with fear, grabs at everything about him, expels a little of the air remaining in his lungs, goes down for another breath of water, comes up utterly insane, and repeats the going down and coming up until his lungs are pretty well filled with water. Then he sinks to stay. His sinkings are very slow, and he does not at first go far below the surface. He probably rises three or four times before he finally goes down. If the lifesaver dashes at the drowning one while he struggles, and attempts to carry him out in dime novel fashion, he is grabbed, pulled down, finds his arms useless, and, unless he is a very strong man or a good wrestler, will be unable to break his hold, and will drown with the man he would save. First of all, then, the lifesaver must remember that there is no need of hurry. The drowning one will not sink at once, not until he has gone down enough times to fill his lungs with water. A little more water will not harm the victim to any extent. He will have to be resuscitated when he is taken ashore anyway, and the more water he breathes now the easier it will be to take him there. When you see a man drowning, therefore, wait. Do not wait on the shore or in a boat. Swim close to the one in danger, so as to be ready when the time comes. But, by all means approach carefully, from behind if possible, so as to be out of reach of his arms. If the man turns around, or if for any reason it is impracticable to approach from the rear, swim as near as necessary in front, but in this case be always on guard. The best guard is to keep the left arm extended as far as possible in front, pointing toward the drowning man. Should he flounder toward you and attempt to grab you, put your left hand against his lower jaw and push him away. Now the only hold he can possibly get is on your arm, and this maybe easily broken by turning, raising one leg so that your foot is on his chest, and then pushing with all your might. After he has gone down once or twice his struggles will weaken. Now is the time to act. Your method of handling the man mill depend on the way he is dressed and the length of his hair. If his hair is long enough to give a good hand hold you need not consider any other grip. Just reach out your left hand, if you are a right handed swimmer, and get a good hold in his hair. If he still shows an inclination to struggle do not be in any hurry to take him out. Just keep your hold and let him take in a little more water, if necessary holding his head under to help along the process. When the struggling is over, turn on your side or back, whichever way you can swim most strongly, and strike out, dragging your man as neccessary.

Do not labor under the impression that you must keep the victim’s head above water. If you can do so easily, it will do no harm, and possibly some good. But if you try to raise him out of the water you tend to force yourself under, and multiply the difficulties of keeping afloat yourself. If you pull him after you, however, letting his head follow as it will, you will find that he floats easily and that your task is not much more difficult than towing a stick of wood or other floating body. All this may sound cruel and coldblooded, but it is not. If you try to take the man out while he is still struggling you are more than likely to drown with him. If you try to hold his head out of water you lessen the chances of saving his life by tiring yourself. Besides, he is nearly as well off brought ashore unconscious as only half so, for if any system commonly employed for resuscitating the drowning be employed he will soon come to consciousness not so very much the worse for his late experience. The easiest man to save, other things being equal, is the long haired one. Next comes the man with the bathing suit on or a suit of clothing loose about the neck. Approach such a one the same way you would approach the man with long hair. Wait for him to quit struggling in the same manner. Then reach your left hand down the back of his neck, inside his bathing suit or coat, and grab firm hold of the garment on the inside. This gives you a good grip, and you may turn and swim out as before. If the drowning person have on no clothing whatever there are two principal methods of taking hold. The rescuer must use his judgment as to which is preferable. The easiest of these, when it is safe, is the hand hold. After the drowning man has stopped struggling get hold of one of his hands, preferably his left, with your own left. Turn and swim, dragging him after you. The greatest objection to this is that if the victim is not quite unconscious your hold on his hand makes it easier for him to turn in his struggles and seize you. Therefore, if you must use the hand hold, and it is a fairly easy way to take a man from the water, do so guardedly, if necessary holding the man by some other grip until his struggles end. If you find yourself in danger of being grabbed, do not hesitate to break away in the harshest manner necessary, for if seized the chances are for your both drowning. A much safer way of approaching and seizing a person who has neither clothing nor hair to take hold of is to approach from behind and put a hand in each of his armpits. To do this you may best approach with the ordinary breast stroke, and then, allowing your body to assume a horizontal position, keep afloat by treading water. You may grab a person who is still struggling in this way, for, since you take hold from both sides at once, you can very easily prevent his turning in either direction. When you have a firm hold, turn, pull the drowning man back until he is floating face up, at the same time bringing your feet upward and forward until they are under the other’s body. Now you are swimming on your back, dragging the unconscious man. If he be very strong and is still inclined to struggle it is best to change your hold from the armpits to the upper arms. You may do this so as to either keep his arms at his sides or by raising them above his head. In either case he is powerless to turn. The advantages of this hold are that it is a very safe approach, and that it can be used on a person who has neither hair nor clothing. It allows one to catch the victim before the latter becomes unconscious. If the latter is a child or a very light person it may be advisable to take this hold even when clothing is worn, but if he be heavy this is the very worst of all. The disadvantages are that it requires both hands and keeps the rescuer’s body below that of the victim, forcing him to lift up somewhat and tending to force his own head under water. If the distance to shore be great it is a very difficult method indeed. In using this hold, and in fact any of the others, the rescuer must bear in mind that it is necessary to husband his own strength. In no way can this be better done than by swimming slowly and keeping the chest full of air. This latter precaution will enable him to float, if he turns on his back. And above all he must bear in mind that all he need do is to get the drowning person ashore. If he can do that resuscitation will bring him back to life. Let the victim float as far down as he will; take it easy, and get to shore with as little effort as possible."

Moral of the story: don't panic. I dunno about simple but it's totally legit bruhThumbsup
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27-05-2015, 05:32 AM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
Try this Tongue

US Navy Swim Call In The Gulf Of Aden

[Image: swim-call-golf-of-aden-iwo-jima-us-navy.jpg]

'Murican Canadian
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27-05-2015, 06:19 AM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
What the heathen said. And wear a floaty thing to help get over your fear. I might agree with Grassy, but he cited a novel. Tongue

living word
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27-05-2015, 06:27 AM (This post was last modified: 27-05-2015 06:31 AM by Bows and Arrows.)
RE: Simple Swim tips.
(26-05-2015 08:10 PM)evenheathen Wrote:  
(26-05-2015 07:58 PM)Mr Woof Wrote:  Thanks! certainly sounds like something I can work on.
I always though balance was a key factor.
Maybe all that stuff I got from books need not be wasted after all.Thumbsup

I'm not entirely sure that "balance" would be the correct term, but perhaps something along those lines. One thing to keep in mind is how much force you can create with simple hand and leg movements to push your body in whatever direction you need to. Using the confidence you can gain from realizing how much buoyancy you naturally have will aid you in being able to keep afloat with minimal effort.

yes, ^^^

get the float figured out,
if floating on your back isnt working, get goggles and a snorkel tube, try floating on your stomach. Every one can do a dead mans float....even dead people!

then start moving the arms gently, little gentle kicks with the feet. once you get comfortable with that, you can roll over into a dog paddle or stay on your back and try a back stroke. I can swim, but I'm not a strong swimmer. I find the back stroke easier for me because I can stop to float if I get winded, and it just doesnt seem to take as much effort. Maybe I'm weird that way. For me it seemed like a natural progression of skills from the float position.


the key to floating is relaxation, if you are at an outdoor pool watch the clouds drift, inside pool? count the ceiling tiles. your ears will be under water ir getting water sloshed in them. Spread your arms out. control your breathing. breath like you do when sleeping, relaxed.


"Life is a daring adventure or it is nothing"--Helen Keller
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27-05-2015, 08:33 AM
RE: Simple Swim tips.
Our local natatorium offers adult swim lessons. These are geared toward the adult swimmer and the instructors understand that, at this point in life, learning to swim is largely psychological. I recommend calling your local Y or natatorium and asking about adult swim lessons. It wouldn't take long, really. You just need someone to help ease you in to it, help you get comfortable and learn to feel the water.

I just wanted to let you know that I love you even though you aren't naked right now. Heart
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