Since there's no god...
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28-03-2010, 07:38 AM
Since there's no god...
Since there is no god protecting us and the earth, we must, as coscientious people, take responsibility for the earth we live on. This is a pretty simple conclusion. I find that every atheist I talk to accepts this responsibility, while so many theists often say they do but don't take it seriously. I suspect its because they believe that their god will protect the earth for them, and if all goes to shit, its gods will anyways, so its not like they can do anything about it.

This is one of the many things that makes me a proud atheist. I do all kinds of things in an effort to be "earth friendly", but I'd like to hear of some of the things you guys do that are perhaps a little out of the ordinary. A little above and beyond. Or even down right strange. All in the name of protecting our planet, and the generations that will follow us.

I do a few things that go beyond the basics of recycling, and trying to conserve energy by driving less and shutting off lights. One of them is producing as much of my own food as I can to reduce the carbon footprint I leave behind. I keep laying hens, so we always have fresh eggs produced by healthy chickens, right in our yard. I also take composting a step further by vermicomposting, to make the worlds best fertilizer. (Basically using red wriggler worms to compost kitchen scraps into rich, nutritious, odorless soil).

How bout you guys?

So many cats, so few good recipes.
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28-03-2010, 09:37 AM
RE: Since there's no god...
I recycle, I don't drive I use public transport for town to town transport and I do a LOT of walking in town. I try to keep electricity use to a minimum and I always turn off unused electronics, but that's about it, I don't have an organic garden or anything.

I still live with my parents since the University I attend is just a thirty minute bus ride from home so I haven't moved out yet. And their dog owns the back yard. I don't think my parents would mind if I grew some veg in fact I think they used to but the dog would eat anything we tried to grow, it's her backyard now Tongue

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28-03-2010, 12:23 PM
 
RE: Since there's no god...
I'm glad to hear others talking about this. It's a pretty obvious conclusion for me to. We drive a hybrid car and sparingly. I wish it were solar but no one's produced that yet. We reuse, recycle, compost, or give away almost everything. I personally where my clothes until they just about disintegrate (no vanity here). All our light bulbs have been replaced with energy efficient ones, energy saver washing machine, thermostat set low in the winter utilizing the wood stove most of the time, huge garden, and this spring we're looking at getting some chickens and a goat. We've just cleared a few trees to let in the sun and we're studying up on solar panels that should go up by next year.

Peak oil happened in the U.S. in the seventies and will be a world wide phenomenon in just four or five more years, the experts calculate. The total time that oil will have been a relevant energy source is about three hundred years--that's barely a blip in the life span of mankind. Unfortunately, the huge amount of growth caused by this cheap and limited resource is unsustainable and the years that we will transition to other forms will be fraught with so many challenges, I can't even begin to go down the list. It was probably the worlds biggest curse that we started down such a road as the decline will be much more rapid and traumatic than anybody envisioned earlier on. That doesn't even address the hugely devastating environmental catastrophe that is looming due to the complacency of the worlds population and the irresponsibility of it's leaders. I won't go any further because books have been written about this ( 'Plan B'--by Lester R. Brown is a good one).

The interrelations among ecology, energy, industry, government, and religion are clear. It's a matter of connecting the dots. My focus is largely on the social implications of religion and politics (which I believe is an intrinsic part of why the planet is in such distress). My father has the mission of relating politics to the vast environmental challenges that have arisen from the willful and unconscionable abuses by industry and government. He has spent the last thirty-five years traveling, being educated and educating on this, the world's and humanity's greatest challenge to date. He gives free presentations to churches of all faiths (or any group that will listen) to expose people to what this government and our society largely denies. On the 17th of April I'll be attending the annual regional assembly of the Unitarian Church on the subject of climate change, ecological awareness, and community responsibility outside of Philadelphia where he will be speaking. If anyone is in the area and wants information, shoot me a personal message here or send me an E-mail. If you'd like to hear more on this from a qualified expert's perspective, just go the my father's website in the signature of this posting. And thank you Stark Raving for bringing this to the floor. Nothing is as monumentally challenging and critically important as this subject is to all of us.
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