Single Malt
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04-08-2017, 09:15 AM
RE: Single Malt
(04-08-2017 08:46 AM)Deesse23 Wrote:  
(04-08-2017 07:48 AM)Grasshopper Wrote:  All I will have left after that is single malt Scotch and.....

Awwwwwwwwww, you poor, poor thing. Censored
Tongue

I'm not complaining, I'm celebrating. Toward the end of last year, I bought a bunch of different kinds of whisk(e)y -- Bourbon, rye, blended Scotch, single malt Scotch, Canadian, Irish, etc. -- and eventually decided that I liked single malt Scotch the best. By that time I had 17 opened bottles of various kinds of whisk(e)y. I decided to finish all of those (as well as any additional bottles of blended Scotch, like the Johnnie Walker Green) before opening any new bottles. Now I'm finally at the point where I can start on the good stuff (the single malt Scotch)!

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04-08-2017, 10:42 AM
RE: Single Malt
(04-08-2017 08:59 AM)aloneinalabama Wrote:  After visiting a few distilleries in Kentucky last summer, I have jumped onto the bourbon bandwagon.

A couple of my favorites are: Jefferson's Ocean, Rebel Yell 10, and McKenna 10.

Attached is a photo of the growing collection.

This afternoon, I will pour myself a glass of Blanton's.

That is an impressive Bourbon collection. I've tried a few Bourbons, but none of the really high-end stuff. The only thing in your collection that I recognized is the Knob Creek in the front (although I just had the regular 9-year-old small batch, not the single barrel), and what looks like Maker's in the back (I had Maker's 46). Those were both good (I also had some Russell's Reserve 10YO, and that too was good), but for me, not as good as single malt Scotch in the same price range. I can't afford the really high-end stuff in either Bourbon or Scotch.
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04-08-2017, 01:00 PM
RE: Single Malt
(04-08-2017 07:48 AM)Grasshopper Wrote:  I'm about to finish my last bottle of blended Scotch (Johnnie Walker Green Label, which is pretty tasty). All I will have left after that is single malt Scotch (a number of different ones) and various Irish whiskeys.

Laphroaig has just announced/released this year's Cairdeas edition, which is basically a cask strength version of their Quarter Cask whisky. Now, Laphroaig Quarter Cask is the best whisky I've tasted so far, but I'm not sure what the point of a cask strength version is (the regular Quarter Cask is already 96 proof). It's not really drinkable without adding water, and then you've basically got regular Quarter Cask! Nevertheless, I will probably get a bottle.

The whisky industry has, I fear, begun to follow in the footsteps of the microbrew industry; they seem to be perpetually seeking and purveying trends. And "cask strength" has apparent switched from being a now-and-then special thing, to an ongoing trend.

To my tastebuds, single malt is at it's best in the 80-90 proof range. Cask strength stuff does need to be watered, and I hate having to add water to my whisky. It is, of course, a money-maker for the distillery: fewer bottles needed per cask, which mean less packaging, and lower shipping costs -- and they can charge a premium price because it's a "special" release. Win-win for them. I just hope they don't get stuck in a "cask strength rut", like the brewing industry did with IPAs.

That said, the Cairdeas series has been very, very good. The port wine cask finished version from (IIRC) 2013 is one of the finest whiskies made, IMO.

The amazing thing is that Laphroaig products, for the most part, remain reasonably priced. Unlike, say, The Macallan 25 yo.

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04-08-2017, 01:56 PM
RE: Single Malt
(04-08-2017 01:00 PM)Dr H Wrote:  The amazing thing is that Laphroaig products, for the most part, remain reasonably priced. Unlike, say, The Macallan 25 yo.

True for the most part -- but I did see a bottle of Laphroaig 30YO a few months ago, way up on the tippy-top shelf, with a price tag of $999.99. I'll bet it's pretty good stuff, but there's no way it's that good! To be fair, it's probably rare enough to justify that price for those who really like it. It's the only bottle of 30YO I've ever seen.
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04-08-2017, 02:24 PM
RE: Single Malt
Here is what I am drinking this afternoon.

Blanton's - great bourbon distilled at Buffalo Trace.


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08-08-2017, 09:09 AM
RE: Single Malt
Since the bottle I just finished was Scotch (Johnnie Walker Green Label), I decided to start my single malt odyssey with something Irish: The Tyrconnell Single Malt. It's priced about the same as some of the lower-end Speyside Scotch (such as Glenlivet and Glenfiddich 12YO), and reminds of those in some ways, although I don't smell or taste as much of the barrel (that vanilla-oak note that is so upfront in Bourbon, and present in just about any whisk(e)y). It's funny -- I read reviews of this and others, and there's all kinds of stuff (fruit, herbs and spices, chocolate, "engine oil" (lol), etc.) that they claim to smell and taste. I don't get any of that -- just a musty/malty aroma with the barest hint of vanilla, a sweetish taste, and a bitterish aftertaste. Are my nose and palate that undeveloped, or are these other guys just making shit up?

Anyway, this doesn't blow me away (like, say, Laphroaig Quarter Cask), but it's not unpleasant either. I'm looking forward to a wee dram every night for the next two or three weeks. Maybe I'll like it better as I get used to it.

@aloneinalabama: I looked for that Blanton's Bourbon in two local liquor stores, and saw no sign of it. Is that sold in the southeast only?
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08-08-2017, 09:36 AM
RE: Single Malt
(04-08-2017 01:00 PM)Dr H Wrote:  
(04-08-2017 07:48 AM)Grasshopper Wrote:  I'm about to finish my last bottle of blended Scotch (Johnnie Walker Green Label, which is pretty tasty). All I will have left after that is single malt Scotch (a number of different ones) and various Irish whiskeys.

Laphroaig has just announced/released this year's Cairdeas edition, which is basically a cask strength version of their Quarter Cask whisky. Now, Laphroaig Quarter Cask is the best whisky I've tasted so far, but I'm not sure what the point of a cask strength version is (the regular Quarter Cask is already 96 proof). It's not really drinkable without adding water, and then you've basically got regular Quarter Cask! Nevertheless, I will probably get a bottle.

The whisky industry has, I fear, begun to follow in the footsteps of the microbrew industry; they seem to be perpetually seeking and purveying trends. And "cask strength" has apparent switched from being a now-and-then special thing, to an ongoing trend.

To my tastebuds, single malt is at it's best in the 80-90 proof range. Cask strength stuff does need to be watered, and I hate having to add water to my whisky. It is, of course, a money-maker for the distillery: fewer bottles needed per cask, which mean less packaging, and lower shipping costs -- and they can charge a premium price because it's a "special" release. Win-win for them. I just hope they don't get stuck in a "cask strength rut", like the brewing industry did with IPAs.

That said, the Cairdeas series has been very, very good. The port wine cask finished version from (IIRC) 2013 is one of the finest whiskies made, IMO.

The amazing thing is that Laphroaig products, for the most part, remain reasonably priced. Unlike, say, The Macallan 25 yo.

Aberlour A'Bunadh is usually around 120 proof and I think it is very tasty. I usually like them much lower than that but it is worth a try if you can get it by the glass somewhere.

Laphroaig 10 is one of my favs. It's a great whisky at a great price. Wasn't a big fan on one of their cask strengths but will give the Cairdreas a try. Thumbsup

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08-08-2017, 01:39 PM
RE: Single Malt
(08-08-2017 09:09 AM)Grasshopper Wrote:  Since the bottle I just finished was Scotch (Johnnie Walker Green Label), I decided to start my single malt odyssey with something Irish: The Tyrconnell Single Malt. It's priced about the same as some of the lower-end Speyside Scotch (such as Glenlivet and Glenfiddich 12YO), and reminds of those in some ways, although I don't smell or taste as much of the barrel (that vanilla-oak note that is so upfront in Bourbon, and present in just about any whisk(e)y). It's funny -- I read reviews of this and others, and there's all kinds of stuff (fruit, herbs and spices, chocolate, "engine oil" (lol), etc.) that they claim to smell and taste. I don't get any of that -- just a musty/malty aroma with the barest hint of vanilla, a sweetish taste, and a bitterish aftertaste.
Irish whiskey is OK, but IMO it's nowhere near as complex as even the simplest Scottish single malt. Probably I'm biased, because I also like at least a bit of peat in the mix, and Irish almost always lacks any trace of peat.

Quote:Are my nose and palate that undeveloped, or are these other guys just making shit up?
LOL. I've wondered about that sort of thing myself. Some of the descriptors that get used by professional tasters make the drink sound anything but appetizing. Laphroaig's list of flavors often includes things like "seaweed"; "medicinal"; " and iodine". I recall when I was learning about Lambic beer, seeing frequent references by tasters to "earthy", "mossy" and "horse blanket".

But what really bugs me are wine tasting notes. You'll see all kinds of things in a wine tasting description like "oaky", "tannic", "grassy", but mainly you see a lot of fruit descriptors: "peach", "citrus", "apple", "cherry", "black currant", "berry", etc.

Except you never see "grape".

Can it really be true that wine made exclusively from grapes can taste of virtually any fruit except grapes? Smile

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"So, I became an anarchist, and all I got was this lousy T-shirt."
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29-08-2017, 10:25 AM
RE: Single Malt
Cracked another bottle of Irish single malt last night: Connemara (no age statement). It's the one and only peated Irish single malt, and I immediately liked it better than my previous bottle of Tyrconnell's. It doesn't seem very complex -- I'm mostly tasting the peat smoke -- but damn, I love that taste. This is good stuff.
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11-09-2017, 03:10 PM
RE: Single Malt
(29-08-2017 10:25 AM)Grasshopper Wrote:  Cracked another bottle of Irish single malt last night: Connemara (no age statement). It's the one and only peated Irish single malt, and I immediately liked it better than my previous bottle of Tyrconnell's. It doesn't seem very complex -- I'm mostly tasting the peat smoke -- but damn, I love that taste. This is good stuff.

Being a "peathead", I'll probably have to give that a try one of these days.

A Scotch whisky with no age statement would have spirits no younger than 8 years old in it. As I recall, for Irish whiskey the minimum age allowed is less (three years, I think), which might partly account for the lack of complexity.

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"So, I became an anarchist, and all I got was this lousy T-shirt."
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