Single Malt
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02-03-2017, 06:19 PM
RE: Single Malt
(02-03-2017 03:55 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  1. I really like the taste of bourbon, but all the ones I've tried so far are pretty similar, without the variety and complexity of the single malt Scotches, which I'm finding to be more interesting.

Bourbon's OK, but definitely not my favorite tipple. I find it too sweet.
But you can certainly get into Bourbon to nearly the same insane levels as Scotch, these days; Bourbon suddenly became really trendy a couple of years ago, and there's a lot of experimentation going on. Kind of old news, though: the new trend appears to be rye. Smile

A good place for keeping track of such trends:

http://whiskyadvocate.com/

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"So, I became an anarchist, and all I got was this lousy T-shirt."
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02-03-2017, 06:25 PM
RE: Single Malt
(23-08-2016 09:12 AM)Dworkin Wrote:  Hi,

Anyone here interested in spirits? I’m currently involved with Glenivet (a sweet Speyside single malt) and Talisker (a salty single malt from the Western islands). Others are waiting quietly in the cellar.

The Glenlivet came with some ‘whisky stones’ which are actual stones that you freeze and put in the whisky like ice cubes. That way it avoids diluting the dram.

What’s your poison?

D.
Yes, I discovered stones recently. Brilliant idea, I do like my spirits straight and those damn ice cubes melt.
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02-03-2017, 06:29 PM
RE: Single Malt
(02-03-2017 04:56 PM)Fireball Wrote:  I'm partial to Glenfiddich and Macallan's. I prefer the single malts to the blends. I can't handle the taste of an Islay scotch. I've tried Laphraoig and Bowmore. Not for me!

No problem there. Glenfiddich and Macallan are both world-class malts, and heavy peat isn't for everybody.

That said, if the first Isaly malt you sampled was Laphroaig, you jumped into the deep end of the peat-pool headfirst. I even know some Islay malt fans who draw the line at Laphroaig. I would have suggested maybe starting your Islay tour with Bunnahabhain 12yo.

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02-03-2017, 07:46 PM
RE: Single Malt
(02-03-2017 06:29 PM)Dr H Wrote:  
(02-03-2017 04:56 PM)Fireball Wrote:  I'm partial to Glenfiddich and Macallan's. I prefer the single malts to the blends. I can't handle the taste of an Islay scotch. I've tried Laphraoig and Bowmore. Not for me!

No problem there. Glenfiddich and Macallan are both world-class malts, and heavy peat isn't for everybody.

That said, if the first Isaly malt you sampled was Laphroaig, you jumped into the deep end of the peat-pool headfirst. I even know some Islay malt fans who draw the line at Laphroaig. I would have suggested maybe starting your Islay tour with Bunnahabhain 12yo.

It was the Bowmore that I bought. Got a bottle of it and tried like hell to enjoy it. I left it in the motel room (I was on travel for a week). The cleaning staff probably dumped $35 of the $40 I paid down the drain, if they didn't take it home. I'd never drink something left in a motel room, personally. Laughat
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03-03-2017, 01:43 AM
RE: Single Malt
I like Bowmore quite a lot. Not so keen on Ardbeg though.

I've always intended doing a tour of the Islay distilleries. Maybe this year. But my tastes have slowly wandered to the more mellow whiskies, such as Speyside that i can get on offer in the supermarkets, such as Glenmorangie or Glenlivet.

Hint for anyone trying to pronounce these names, there's no emphasis of any vowel. And Islay is actually pronounced I-la.
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03-03-2017, 09:27 AM
RE: Single Malt
(02-03-2017 06:19 PM)Dr H Wrote:  
(02-03-2017 03:55 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  1. I really like the taste of bourbon, but all the ones I've tried so far are pretty similar, without the variety and complexity of the single malt Scotches, which I'm finding to be more interesting.

Bourbon's OK, but definitely not my favorite tipple. I find it too sweet.
But you can certainly get into Bourbon to nearly the same insane levels as Scotch, these days; Bourbon suddenly became really trendy a couple of years ago, and there's a lot of experimentation going on. Kind of old news, though: the new trend appears to be rye. Smile

A good place for keeping track of such trends:

http://whiskyadvocate.com/

Funny you should mention rye, because I've found that I like rye better than Bourbon, for the same reason that I like Scotch better than Bourbon -- more complex, more interesting. Bourbon has a great taste (and an even better smell), but it's kind of a one-note song. Rye adds some spice to that basic taste. Of course, most Bourbons are made with rye as well as corn, and some have enough rye that it's noticeable, but it really gets interesting when there's enough rye to call it rye rather than Bourbon.

It's funny that I find Scotch more complex than either of those, because conceptually it's simpler -- nothing in there but malted barley, whereas the others have some of that plus corn and rye. I can only conclude that barley must be inherently more complex and interesting than either corn or rye.

Once I finish up my current open bottles of Bourbon, rye, and Scotch blends, I intend to "major" in single malt Scotch, with a "minor" in Irish whiskey. That's where my initial investigations have pointed me. Malt is where it's at!
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03-03-2017, 09:50 AM
RE: Single Malt
*pours himself some Balvenie 2x wood*

Well,

my favourite is Bowmore Enigma. A friend also introduced me to Lagavulin 16y. These are my two tops atm. Yet, i also wont pour HP or Macallan in the gutter. As long as its not too heavy on peat ( almost like munching soil), i probably am gunna luv it.

Ohh, a friend once got himself some Ardbeg 18y (and shared some with me). Impressive, but insanely expensive.

cheers

Ceterum censeo, religionem delendam esse
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03-03-2017, 02:12 PM
RE: Single Malt
(02-03-2017 07:46 PM)Fireball Wrote:  It was the Bowmore that I bought. Got a bottle of it and tried like hell to enjoy it. I left it in the motel room (I was on travel for a week). The cleaning staff probably dumped $35 of the $40 I paid down the drain, if they didn't take it home. I'd never drink something left in a motel room, personally. Laughat

I shied away from Bowmore for a while. They had an unfortunate incident with their equipment some years ago that left a number of their products tasting like they had come out of a perfume factory, rather than a distillery. Recently, though, I tried some of the Bowmore Legend, which I found competently done, and light on the peat -- but not, IMO, a very deep or complex whisky. Very drinkable for the price, though.

Bowmore's always been kind of hit-or-miss, but since they seem to have solved the perfume problem, I may try some of their other offerings.

And no, I would never drink anything I found left in a motel room. Laugh out load

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03-03-2017, 02:24 PM
RE: Single Malt
(03-03-2017 01:43 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  But my tastes have slowly wandered to the more mellow whiskies, such as Speyside that i can get on offer in the supermarkets, such as Glenmorangie or Glenlivet.

Glenmorangie seem to be experimenting with aging their whisky in every sort of cask imaginable -- port, sherry, amontillado, sauternes, and whatnot. I tried the port finish, and liked it, but the sherry finish had an odd bitter note that clashed, rather violently, I thought, with the other flavors. Given the prices these go for around here I haven't been inclined to experiment further. It sucks to pay a high price for a bottle that you may find undrinkable.

I have nothing to say against The Glenlivet -- it's essential.

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"So, I became an anarchist, and all I got was this lousy T-shirt."
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03-03-2017, 02:28 PM
RE: Single Malt
(03-03-2017 02:24 PM)Dr H Wrote:  Glenmorangie seem to be experimenting with aging their whisky in every sort of cask imaginable -- port, sherry, amontillado, sauternes, and whatnot. I tried the port finish, and liked it, but the sherry finish had an odd bitter note that clashed, rather violently, I thought, with the other flavors. Given the prices these go for around here I haven't been inclined to experiment further. It sucks to pay a high price for a bottle that you may find undrinkable.

I have nothing to say against The Glenlivet -- it's essential.

I've never had a bad Glenmorangie myself. The only bottle I have at the moment is a Glenlivet 15year old French Oak Reserve.

When I went to our house in Germany over Christmas I brought a whisky at the airport with the intention of drinking it with guests but I never opened it. I can't even remember what it was called. Sometimes it's nice to buy one of the really obscure whiskies you can get in Scotland.
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