Slacklining
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
02-05-2017, 12:26 PM (This post was last modified: 02-05-2017 02:22 PM by jennybee.)
Slacklining
Have you heard about this? It's called slacklining.

From wiki: "Slacklining refers to the act of walking or balancing along a suspended length of flat webbing that is tensioned between two anchors. Slacklining is similar to slack rope walking and tightrope walking. Slacklines differ from tightwires and tightropes in the type of material used and the amount of tension applied during use. Slacklines are tensioned significantly less than tightropes or tightwires in order to create a dynamic line which will stretch and bounce like a long and narrow trampoline. Tension can be adjusted to suit the user, and different webbing may be used in various circumstances. Slacklining is popular because of its simplicity and versatility; it can be used in various environments with few components."

Looks like so much fun! Thumbsup Heart I so want to try this. Has anyone done it before?

[Image: 413512.jpg]

[Image: 1401511_539788099435787_1492430460_o-300x200.jpg]

[Image: Slackline2.jpg]

[Image: halfway-across-leaves-a-long-way-to-go.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-05-2017, 12:29 PM
RE: Slacklining
Never heard of it but it looks like a great workout!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Emma's post
02-05-2017, 12:30 PM
RE: Slacklining
(02-05-2017 12:26 PM)jennybee Wrote:  Have you heard about this? It's called slacklining.

From wiki: "Slacklining refers to the act of walking or balancing along a suspended length of flat webbing that is tensioned between two anchors. Slacklining is similar to slack rope walking and tightrope walking. Slacklines differ from tightwires and tightropes in the type of material used and the amount of tension applied during use. Slacklines are tensioned significantly less than tightropes or tightwires in order to create a dynamic line which will stretch and bounce like a long and narrow trampoline. Tension can be adjusted to suit the user, and different webbing may be used in various circumstances. Slacklining is popular because of its simplicity and versatility; it can be used in various environments with few components."

Ohmynogod, looks like so much fun! Thumbsup Heart I so want to try this. Has anyone done it before?

Not a chance. I've been known to lose my balance walking across the room (on a regular flat floor). No gymnastics or slacklining for me.

Laugh out load
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like Grasshopper's post
02-05-2017, 12:51 PM
RE: Slacklining
The closest thing to slacklining that I do is to balance along the side of the sidewalk gutter thingy.

See that little cement ridge there next to the grass?

[Image: concrete_curb_and_cutter.jpg]

I don't know what part of the sidewalk this is called but when I take walks I walk along that as much as I can. People think I'm rather strange but it's good for balance. Sometimes I take two or three steps on the curb thingy and then hop off for a few steps, then back up on the gutter side thingy. Balancing on the sidewalk gutter isn't as difficult as slacklining but I walk pretty fast and gutter ridges are free and everywhere in the neighborhood. I also like the silliness of walking along the gutter. I feel like a little kid.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like dancefortwo's post
02-05-2017, 01:03 PM
RE: Slacklining
(02-05-2017 12:51 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  The closest thing to slacklining that I do is to balance along the side of the sidewalk gutter thingy.

See that little cement ridge there next to the grass?

[Image: concrete_curb_and_cutter.jpg]

I don't know what part of the sidewalk this is called but when I take walks I walk along that as much as I can. People think I'm rather strange but it's good for balance. Sometimes I take two or three steps on the curb thingy and then hop off for a few steps, then back up on the gutter side thingy. Balancing on the sidewalk gutter isn't as difficult as slacklining but I walk pretty fast and gutter ridges are free and everywhere in the neighborhood. I also like the silliness of walking along the gutter. I feel like a little kid.

I would call that the curb, and I do that sometimes too. But I can usually only go a few steps before losing my balance.

I saw a birthday card the other day in the grocery store that had a picture of a little girl making a silly face and sticking her tongue out. The caption/text was "You're never too old to act like you're not." With some qualifications, I try to take that to heart.

But not to derail the thread -- back to slacklining!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Grasshopper's post
02-05-2017, 01:40 PM
RE: Slacklining
I don't mind acrobatics with sane safety measures. But I really don't like it when fans of dare devils who don't take the safety measures get themselves killed needlessly, and the fans say "it is such a tragedy". Really? A safety net or safety harness would have prevented that.

So it depends. If you are sane about your risk taking, great. But if you are pulling a stunt to get attention without all the safety redundancy then what do you want me to say? One certainly does not deserve to die, but if you don't want to die, especially when it is for mere entertainment, then maybe showboating should not be an option.

Poetry by Brian37(poems by an atheist) Also on Facebook as BrianJames Rational Poet and Twitter Brianrrs37
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Brian37's post
02-05-2017, 01:50 PM
RE: Slacklining
I forgot which famous tightrope walker fell to his death trying to walk between the twin towers in NYC back in the 70s or early 80s. Why did he think a safety harness would make him a wimp? I cant do that even with one. I would not have thought less of him if he had used a safety harness.

Redundancy in real life as far as safety is why the Apollo 13 crew in REAL LIFE made it back despite the oxygen tank problem. The movie really distorted reality. Most of what they had to revise on the spot in the real mission was planned ahead.

Poetry by Brian37(poems by an atheist) Also on Facebook as BrianJames Rational Poet and Twitter Brianrrs37
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-05-2017, 01:56 PM
RE: Slacklining
(02-05-2017 01:40 PM)Brian37 Wrote:  I don't mind acrobatics with sane safety measures. But I really don't like it when fans of dare devils who don't take the safety measures get themselves killed needlessly, and the fans say "it is such a tragedy". Really? A safety net or safety harness would have prevented that.

So it depends. If you are sane about your risk taking, great. But if you are pulling a stunt to get attention without all the safety redundancy then what do you want me to say? One certainly does not deserve to die, but if you don't want to die, especially when it is for mere entertainment, then maybe showboating should not be an option.

Agreed you should do it safely. That's why most people do it over water or not very high off the ground and in some cases, if a lil higher, they use a safety harness. I'm a safety girl and only believe in adventuring safely Thumbsup
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes jennybee's post
02-05-2017, 01:57 PM
RE: Slacklining
(02-05-2017 01:03 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  
(02-05-2017 12:51 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  The closest thing to slacklining that I do is to balance along the side of the sidewalk gutter thingy.

See that little cement ridge there next to the grass?

[Image: concrete_curb_and_cutter.jpg]

I don't know what part of the sidewalk this is called but when I take walks I walk along that as much as I can. People think I'm rather strange but it's good for balance. Sometimes I take two or three steps on the curb thingy and then hop off for a few steps, then back up on the gutter side thingy. Balancing on the sidewalk gutter isn't as difficult as slacklining but I walk pretty fast and gutter ridges are free and everywhere in the neighborhood. I also like the silliness of walking along the gutter. I feel like a little kid.

I would call that the curb, and I do that sometimes too. But I can usually only go a few steps before losing my balance.

I saw a birthday card the other day in the grocery store that had a picture of a little girl making a silly face and sticking her tongue out. The caption/text was "You're never too old to act like you're not." With some qualifications, I try to take that to heart.

But not to derail the thread -- back to slacklining!

So agree! You need to have fun in life and act like a little kid on occasion. Thumbsup
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-05-2017, 02:13 PM
RE: Slacklining
(02-05-2017 01:50 PM)Brian37 Wrote:  I forgot which famous tightrope walker fell to his death trying to walk between the twin towers in NYC back in the 70s or early 80s. Why did he think a safety harness would make him a wimp? I cant do that even with one. I would not have thought less of him if he had used a safety harness.

Redundancy in real life as far as safety is why the Apollo 13 crew in REAL LIFE made it back despite the oxygen tank problem. The movie really distorted reality. Most of what they had to revise on the spot in the real mission was planned ahead.

You might be thinking of Karl Wallenda, who fell to his death while attempting to walk between two much smaller towers in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The only person I know of who ever attempted the twin towers in NYC was Philippe Petit, who succeeded in 1974 and is still alive today. There was recently an IMAX movie (called "The Walk") about his adventure.

Those guys are professionals, though. They know the risks they're taking, and the possibility of falling is part of the game. You can't really compare them to some amateur who just wants to try it. Such people should definitely take safety precautions (and even the pros take safety precautions to a certain extent, as was made plain in the movie I referred to).
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Grasshopper's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: