Southern loneliness
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
30-06-2015, 08:58 AM
RE: Southern loneliness
Heya Lizard, it sounds like you've got a decent modus vivendi going on. My son's mother and I had a similar arrangement, in some ways.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
30-06-2015, 09:10 AM
RE: Southern loneliness
During my years in SC I was surrounded by the Bible beaters. My kids and I aren't religious and didn't attend church unless they went with friends. My husband is a sorta-kinda believer but I have only known him to enter a church a handful of times in the 23 years we have been married.

My son was a good athlete - baseball and football. My social life consisted of attending his games and I had a great time. Baseball being a smaller group meant that there was a core group of us who were together a lot and we had a great time - at the games and ball related functions. I trusted the whole group of parents with my son and they trusted me with theirs - at games. However, that's where it ended...I didn't drink or pray and was therefore looked at with suspicion.

It was lonely. Good thing I'm not a people person. Undecided

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Anjele's post
30-06-2015, 09:39 AM
RE: Southern loneliness
I have as much "Southern pride" as the most redneck, Battle-Flag-flying, intolerant Christian asshole in the depths of deep, dark Dixie... but it's definitely lonely down here, when the rest of your family are busily telling you demonstrably false nonsense and you're called "angry" and "bitter" when you point out the way to falsify their assertions. I also don't fly the Battle Flag or any other flag of the Confederacy because they were treasonous to the United States over an issue (White Supremacy) I find morally repugnant, and I'm honest enough to admit that.

Being from Louisiana, I was also a weirdo for not drinking until I was well above the legal age, and only occasionally drinking to this day (once I discovered the awful beers enjoyed by most Southerners are not the only kinds of beer that exist). But I was literally kicked out of my house at 17 for refusing to continue to go to church. God is love, I guess. I'm only mildly bitter about that, and not bitter at "God" or at being an atheist at all. My mindset is freeing in every way; scientific understanding of most "problems" in this world lends me a surprisingly-clear perspective, and on the few questions that cannot be answered by the scientific method and its resulting knowledge, I find that I enjoy pondering the "unknown and unanswerable" philosophies of this life, and not knowing the answer with any certainty. Being able to admit to my exact degree of uncertainty on all questions is what makes freethinking feel so liberating--it's only the crazy religionists that surround me, and who are so certain of their beliefs even when confronted with hard proof of falsehood, that make life difficult.

I hope all of you who feel lonely as an atheist, as I often do, reflect on the price of blissful ignorance.

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like RocketSurgeon76's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: