Space travel
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
10-04-2012, 10:12 AM
RE: Space travel
There's (unfortunately) a lot of problems with space travel. Primary of which is that the human body has not evolved for the constant free-fall conditions experienced in space. Even with rigorous exercise programs, astronauts cannot stay in space for more than six months. The next major problem is colonization. The nearest stars (that may not even have planet systems) are around ten lightyears away (bear in mind, however, that lightspeed/FTL travel may be impossible since our current understanding is that anything that has mass cannot come close to approaching the speed of light). We could, of course, colonize many of the quasi-habitable rocky moons (like the Galilean moons), but that only delays the death of our species with our Sun. For space travel to sufficiently works, we (humans as a whole race) NEED to: A) figure out some way of creating artificial gravity or a training regimen that prevents muscle deterioration, B) begin serious efforts to harvest resources outside of Earth, and C) do this all in under a billion years (because our Sun is only going to be getting bigger and hotter and in about 2 billion years Earth will no longer be in a Goldilocks zone) assuming something else disastrous doesn't happen (like worldwide nuclear fallout, the awakening of Cthulhu, or the reelection of George W. Bush for a third term).
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-04-2012, 01:35 PM
RE: Space travel
(10-04-2012 10:12 AM)SaviourSelf Wrote:  There's (unfortunately) a lot of problems with space travel. Primary of which is that the human body has not evolved for the constant free-fall conditions experienced in space. Even with rigorous exercise programs, astronauts cannot stay in space for more than six months. The next major problem is colonization. The nearest stars (that may not even have planet systems) are around ten lightyears away (bear in mind, however, that lightspeed/FTL travel may be impossible since our current understanding is that anything that has mass cannot come close to approaching the speed of light). We could, of course, colonize many of the quasi-habitable rocky moons (like the Galilean moons), but that only delays the death of our species with our Sun. For space travel to sufficiently works, we (humans as a whole race) NEED to: A) figure out some way of creating artificial gravity or a training regimen that prevents muscle deterioration, B) begin serious efforts to harvest resources outside of Earth, and C) do this all in under a billion years (because our Sun is only going to be getting bigger and hotter and in about 2 billion years Earth will no longer be in a Goldilocks zone) assuming something else disastrous doesn't happen (like worldwide nuclear fallout, the awakening of Cthulhu, or the reelection of George W. Bush for a third term).
A billion years is a fuck long time though. Most species, even successful species like crocs, have only been around like 300 million years max. Assuming we get past the blowing each other up for silly reasons stage of our evolution, a billion years should be plenty of time.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-04-2012, 02:10 PM
RE: Space travel
(10-04-2012 01:35 PM)morondog Wrote:  
(10-04-2012 10:12 AM)SaviourSelf Wrote:  There's (unfortunately) a lot of problems with space travel. Primary of which is that the human body has not evolved for the constant free-fall conditions experienced in space. Even with rigorous exercise programs, astronauts cannot stay in space for more than six months. The next major problem is colonization. The nearest stars (that may not even have planet systems) are around ten lightyears away (bear in mind, however, that lightspeed/FTL travel may be impossible since our current understanding is that anything that has mass cannot come close to approaching the speed of light). We could, of course, colonize many of the quasi-habitable rocky moons (like the Galilean moons), but that only delays the death of our species with our Sun. For space travel to sufficiently works, we (humans as a whole race) NEED to: A) figure out some way of creating artificial gravity or a training regimen that prevents muscle deterioration, B) begin serious efforts to harvest resources outside of Earth, and C) do this all in under a billion years (because our Sun is only going to be getting bigger and hotter and in about 2 billion years Earth will no longer be in a Goldilocks zone) assuming something else disastrous doesn't happen (like worldwide nuclear fallout, the awakening of Cthulhu, or the reelection of George W. Bush for a third term).
A billion years is a fuck long time though. Most species, even successful species like crocs, have only been around like 300 million years max. Assuming we get past the blowing each other up for silly reasons stage of our evolution, a billion years should be plenty of time.
True, but I don't think we could accomplish such things as FTL travel or artificial gravity without another mega-genius. I mean someone on the level of Isaac Newton, someone that would be able to resolve the differences between quantum and relative physics. The thing is, though, that I don't believe a Newton is the kind of person that shows up once in a decade, or a lifetime, or a century, or even a millennium. I think a guy like Newton is a once-in-history type of thing. Einstein and Hawking even (though Hawking attributes most of his accomplishments on the sense of a need to rush research due to his disease) can't compare to some of the things the guy did at a remarkably young age. But not only do we have to wait for this once-in-history event for a second time, we also have to not blow ourselves up. As humans, we have blissfully short lifespans. And I fear that that would keep future generations far too short-sighted for any real colonization efforts to begin. Instead, considering humans have already created more than enough power to destroy the planet, I think we'll come to the point where every one thousand peaceful advances gives way to at least one more way the human race can wipe itself out. I fear I may not seem like much of an optimist, but again, my lifespan is so blissfully short I'll never know if either of possibilities happen.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-04-2012, 02:39 PM
RE: Space travel
Nah man, Newton et al were sharp, but with a large number of us and a bit of thought and a billion years we'll deffo produce another one, through the power of fucking Big Grin He wasn't like a freak of nature or anything - Gauss was fuckin' at least as smart as Newton - that's 2, Gauss rated Archimedes as being as smart as himself, that's 3 within 2000 years without even trying - who knows how many potential Newton's are stuck in a hovel somewhere. Ever heard of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Srinivasa_Ramanujan ? The man's a fuckin' legend. Loadsa smart people out there Smile
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-04-2012, 03:34 PM
RE: Space travel
The last I heard about our manned mission to mars (before budget cuts) was coming in the next 10-30 years. The trip wouldn't be that long. The astronauts were supposed to say a year or 6 months I think. I can't remember the exacts. We can make artificial gravity in space but it isn't as efficient as mass. Further testing would need to be done on artificial gravity and of course several studies are still needed. Mar's gravity is 1/3 the gravity of earth. Speculation is that we could survive on mars with that little of gravity.

Just so much info still needed Sad

Idiot: : a foolish or stupid person
— idiot adjective
See Republican Candidates.

Keeping realism alive, one honest offensive comment at a time!
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: