Spanish Teacher's Tumor
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21-03-2014, 12:06 AM
Photo Spanish Teacher's Tumor
I originally had the idea to turn this real life occurrence into a post as I am now (about 2 weeks ago), but it had slipped my mind until tonight, when the night is as dark as my thoughts, and my sleeplessness flows wearily.

Many months ago, I had posted a bit of a rant, catering to those who have been mistreated by the religious, however inadvertent this mistreatment is, and there is a new update (of sorts) that this post entails.

If you have read this previous post of mine, I iterated that my Spanish teacher always finds it necessary to invoke and fit her Lord, Jesus H. Christ, into every near-intellectual conversation that the classroom erratically strikes into, sometimes going so far to say "Jesus is Lord, do not disrespect him". In this post, I had also mentioned how my Spanish teacher (who has/had a tumor) had branded me unintelligent for having a belief within theology (or lack of theology) that differs from hers, which righteously pissed me off.

Just as I have previously stated, she finds a way to invoke her god into almost anything within the realm of conversation, or, rather, within the realm of reality. And, it was no surprise to me that she did the same when she gave the class her ill-fated news, which, was good news to her, but bad for those who feel uncomfortable when others claim, arrogantly so, to be the result of a "miracle", or, "divine intervention".

Previously, before it occurred to me that she was suffering from a tumor behind her eyeball, I had thought she hated me, as she would occasionally enter my grades incorrectly, resulting in the dropping of said grades. But, like a worthy student, I would tell her the apparent wrongdoing, and it would be fixed. However, the darker side of myself ruminated of her devising a plan to ruin my life, so that I may turn to her god, but this, of course, was entirely too far fetched. No, it seems a lot simpler that she could not see the computer screen clearly, for the tumor had left little room for her eye, and had subsequently caused her to go blind.

Further, in the revealing of this news to the classroom (of which she had told us never to tell any others, as we were her trusted class, oops), she felt it necessary to blatantly show us her bible, and explain how she could not see, by claiming that she reads the text every night before bed, and how she could not see it. While she was showing us her tattered bible, I was sarcastically thinking, "What a good example to set while explaining your ill-fated illness, for no one will question the fact that you have to set this example so blatantly, and turn to it in your times of need, thus recommending us to as well."

Usually I am not as suspicious as I have made myself out to be through the spilling of my thoughts, but there was something incredibly odd about her gestures and how she made it a point to show us her bible (it was also sitting right there, on the stool that she often uses in class while teaching, as if she had planned it, and, yes, I do have a bit of an OCD-ish thing about non-verbal analysis).

Maybe she had not planned to show us her bible, for the look on her face indicated that she was reminded by her bible of a conversation, which, judging by her sudden increase in vocabulary (for a semi-English-fluent Spanish teacher), she had imagined countless times beforehand; that of her "miracle".

Of course, the story that she had told, in that very moment, made me very uncomfortable, and, when I am uncomfortable, I over analyze the gestures of those causing my discomfort, and how disingenuous they were.

She had made it a point, during her long epitaph of what she thought was cancer, to seize her eye contact to my side of the room, for I can see through her bullshit, and I believe she knows I can, so there was no point to make a valiant effort to try and change my opinion of her beliefs.

The tears, though, they were real. Through her nonverbal language, her story was romanticized to a large degree, but the fear that she had experienced had left an imprint on her emotions, the tears were real.

Sitting at the front of the class, I needed, desperately, a way to get out of this mess, which began to make me and those around me very uncomfortable, so I simply put my head down, but I could still hear. From this point onwards there was no clue within my mind on whether or not she was being disingenuous in her words, and I do not care, because I know that she does not really believe that god had blessed her, because in her point of unknowing (that of whether or not the tumor was malignant or benign), she had been alone, and god had left her there, which scared her.

I dare not say anything, because you do not add salt to a wound.

Thank you for reading my over-analysis of my teacher's I-don't-have-cancer speech and the giant wall of text that came with it.
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21-03-2014, 12:22 AM
RE: Spanish Teacher's Tumor
Fallacious appeals to emotions. Yes, they tend to draw one in. Which is why they work so well on the credulous.

It's Special Pleadings all the way down!


Magic Talking Snakes STFU -- revenantx77


You can't have your special pleading and eat it too. -- WillHop
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21-03-2014, 12:24 AM
RE: Spanish Teacher's Tumor
If push should ever come to shove, there are obviously only three possible answers she could come up with.

1. There is some great meaning behind it that you'll probably never figure out. Why?

2. He doesn't care, and you were reading too much into it in the first place.

3. He doesn't exist and this shit happens all the time naturally, and you were reading too much into it in the first place.

I'm not too concerned about heaven or hell when god can't even let us know what the fuck he's doing about our regular earthly existence, his first attempts seem a bit humanly faulty right out of the gates, if you ask me. Just sayin'.

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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21-03-2014, 09:29 AM
RE: Spanish Teacher's Tumor
How dare you doubt
Gawd's Plan!
Gawd's Plan!
Gawd's Plan!
Gawd's Plan!
Gawd's Plan!
Gawd's Plan!
Gawd's Plan!

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21-03-2014, 10:46 AM
RE: Spanish Teacher's Tumor
If someone is in a situation like that, obviously emotional, but claiming to be happy because its part of "God's plan".... They're scared and trying to convince themselves that everything is under control.

Just give 'em big hug... Human kindness, compassion and empathy are the beginning of Humanism.

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22-03-2014, 08:40 AM
RE: Spanish Teacher's Tumor
If you're in a public school there's a quick fix. Tell her to stop. Tell her that you appreciate her struggle and understand that her faith gives her comfort but you feel uncomfortable being preached to. If she doesn't stop tell an administrator. Tell your parents. Write the school board. Eventually it will stop.
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