Steam summer sale.
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
24-06-2017, 02:47 PM
RE: Steam summer sale.
(24-06-2017 02:36 PM)Dark Light Wrote:  
(24-06-2017 01:06 PM)JDog554 Wrote:  Just bought Final Fantasy X/X-II HD Remaster.
[Image: giphy.gif]

This is a somewhat controversial thing to say, but for me, X was where Square begin going of the tracks. By X-2, it was a trainwrek. A lot of people loved X, and it did have it's merits, but it was far too linear for my liking, the story was lacking, and the boss was incredibly stupid, unchallenging, and failed to wrap up the unsatisfying story. It did have some decent characters, and I actually loved the sphere-ball mini game thing. The graphics were very good. X-2, if I could say it had a redeeming quality it would be half-naked digital women for a young teenager?? Not very good. The first FF I failed to complete.

FFXV was a step in the right direction though. Thumbsup

At this point it's more nostalgia. I don't think it's a coincidence though the creator of FF, Sakaguchi left Square after X-II. Glad he did though because he then went on to make Lost Odyssey which is in my opinion one of the best JRPGs.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
24-06-2017, 04:54 PM
RE: Steam summer sale.
(24-06-2017 02:47 PM)JDog554 Wrote:  
(24-06-2017 02:36 PM)Dark Light Wrote:  This is a somewhat controversial thing to say, but for me, X was where Square begin going of the tracks. By X-2, it was a trainwrek. A lot of people loved X, and it did have it's merits, but it was far too linear for my liking, the story was lacking, and the boss was incredibly stupid, unchallenging, and failed to wrap up the unsatisfying story. It did have some decent characters, and I actually loved the sphere-ball mini game thing. The graphics were very good. X-2, if I could say it had a redeeming quality it would be half-naked digital women for a young teenager?? Not very good. The first FF I failed to complete.

FFXV was a step in the right direction though. Thumbsup

At this point it's more nostalgia. I don't think it's a coincidence though the creator of FF, Sakaguchi left Square after X-II. Glad he did though because he then went on to make Lost Odyssey which is in my opinion one of the best JRPGs.

I'm not familiar with it. Perhaps I'll check it out.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
24-06-2017, 10:30 PM (This post was last modified: 24-06-2017 11:21 PM by EvolutionKills.)
RE: Steam summer sale.
(24-06-2017 02:36 PM)Dark Light Wrote:  
(24-06-2017 01:06 PM)JDog554 Wrote:  Just bought Final Fantasy X/X-II HD Remaster.
[Image: giphy.gif]

This is a somewhat controversial thing to say, but for me, X was where Square begin going of the tracks. By X-2, it was a trainwrek. A lot of people loved X, and it did have it's merits, but it was far too linear for my liking, the story was lacking, and the boss was incredibly stupid, unchallenging, and failed to wrap up the unsatisfying story. It did have some decent characters, and I actually loved the sphere-ball mini game thing. The graphics were very good. X-2, if I could say it had a redeeming quality it would be half-naked digital women for a young teenager?? Not very good. The first FF I failed to complete.

FFXV was a step in the right direction though. Thumbsup


The first and last one I managed to complete (ignoring the Tactics games, which I've enjoyed) was FFVIII, and it's the only one I'd ever really care to go back to.

For the most part, for me Final Fantasy starts and stops with the Ivalice Alliance. Which means I probably should get around to playing that copy of FFXII I have lying around from my time at a used media store. Still kinda hoping that they put FFXII on PC, really don't want to hook up that PS2 Slim to my HDTV. Playing Wii games on my WiiU already look terrible enough.

Once you go western RPG, it's really hard to go back.















Also this video, made in 2012, remarking on how people were pining for a proper Kingdom Hearts 3 after all those handheld spin-offs? Took them fuckin' long enough, didn't it?

Yes, I am still salty about the douche-bag dude bros in school who game me shit over having a Gamecube, while I was playing Resident Evil 4 and they were geeking out over Kingdom Hearts. Bunch of fuckin' tossers...

[Image: E3WvRwZ.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
25-06-2017, 03:55 AM (This post was last modified: 25-06-2017 03:59 AM by Dark Light.)
RE: Steam summer sale.
(24-06-2017 10:30 PM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  
(24-06-2017 02:36 PM)Dark Light Wrote:  This is a somewhat controversial thing to say, but for me, X was where Square begin going of the tracks. By X-2, it was a trainwrek. A lot of people loved X, and it did have it's merits, but it was far too linear for my liking, the story was lacking, and the boss was incredibly stupid, unchallenging, and failed to wrap up the unsatisfying story. It did have some decent characters, and I actually loved the sphere-ball mini game thing. The graphics were very good. X-2, if I could say it had a redeeming quality it would be half-naked digital women for a young teenager?? Not very good. The first FF I failed to complete.

FFXV was a step in the right direction though. Thumbsup


The first and last one I managed to complete (ignoring the Tactics games, which I've enjoyed) was FFVIII, and it's the only one I'd ever really care to go back to.

For the most part, for me Final Fantasy starts and stops with the Ivalice Alliance. Which means I probably should get around to playing that copy of FFXII I have lying around from my time at a used media store. Still kinda hoping that they put FFXII on PC, really don't want to hook up that PS2 Slim to my HDTV. Playing Wii games on my WiiU already look terrible enough.

Once you go western RPG, it's really hard to go back.















Also this video, made in 2012, remarking on how people were pining for a proper Kingdom Hearts 3 after all those handheld spin-offs? Took them fuckin' long enough, didn't it?

Yes, I am still salty about the douche-bag dude bros in school who game me shit over having a Gamecube, while I was playing Resident Evil 4 and they were geeking out over Kingdom Hearts. Bunch of fuckin' tossers...

For me VIII was the weakest FF among what I would call the 'Golden Age' of FF games. Still fun. Still enjoyed it. But for my money it was not as good as V, VI, VII, or IX.

That video series is interesting, and the points made in it might explain why I think XV is a step in the right direction. Completely new combat system that's not menu-driven, more focus on discovery, and while the story isn't the best FF story I've seen, it's not half-bad, and they are still expanding it through DLC as well. The biggest flaws of the game, IMHO, is the amount of 'dead' time you are just driving, or walking, or riding chocobos. They would've done better with faster transportation and shrinking the map. They did stumble on the story, according to some, because the way the story was 'edited' confused some people, but I didn't have that problem. Apparently in an update they swapped some scenes in the game to 'correct' that. The Boss battles were pretty much impossible to lose, which stinks. Lastly, the last ~20% of the game (by time spent playing) is far too linear for my liking, but they even improved that post-release as well. Despite all of that I still Platinum Trophied the game, the only PS4 game which I have, so overall I still thought it was fantastic. If you abandoned JRPGS in favor of Western RPGs, I think it's worth checking out. It's much closer to Fallout or Elder Scrolls than FFVIII in terms of game play. I think you'd call it a 'Western RPG' based on the provided video.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-06-2017, 12:06 AM
RE: Steam summer sale.
Im conflicted if I should get Warhammer Total War or not...
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-06-2017, 12:39 AM (This post was last modified: 26-06-2017 04:12 AM by EvolutionKills.)
RE: Steam summer sale.
(25-06-2017 03:55 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  For me VIII was the weakest FF among what I would call the 'Golden Age' of FF games. Still fun. Still enjoyed it. But for my money it was not as good as V, VI, VII, or IX.

I've started to play through every mainline Final Fantasy, from the first up to IX, but VIII was the only one I ever cared to finish.

Now unlike the others, for me VIII has a lot of nostalgia going for it, as I did encounter that one first when I was much younger; but it left an indelible impression. I can still to this day hum the main Balamb Garden theme, and just hearing it again makes me feel happy. Aw man, those harp chords and bell chimes, hits me right in the feels.






I still think is has the best opening score.






Final Fantasy VII didn't do much for me. Even by the standards of it's own time, I didn't think it looked all that great. The style they used just didn't work for me. I can appreciate the throw-back appeal of the chibi proportioned models being used in the over world, but that made it contrast even more with the battle models. Plus the game relies predominately on flat shaded polygons, not textured one (also they're just floating in space, the vertices at the joints are not connected). I came to FFVII after playing one of the best looking PSOne games, Metal Gear Solid, and FFVII looks down right archaic in comparison.

Here are some screenshots to highlight what I'm talking about.

[Image: e75c479302.jpg]

The only texture on Tifa is her eyes, the rest of the model just has flat shaded polygons. Also it's very clear that her upper arm and shoulder are not connected to her torso, but rather just floating in the space next to it; they are separate objects. The models in FFVII are not a single contiguous polygon mesh, but rather a series of smaller pieces all floating close to each other to approximate being connected, but they're not.

Now compare that to FFVIII and Metal Gear Solid.

[Image: gfs_50281_2_41_mid.jpg]

[Image: gfs_58122_2_3.jpg]

Single contiguous models, with texture maps. This stuff irked me when I was kid, and going to college for Game Art & Design didn't change that; it just made it easier to both quantify and explain, and conversely that much harder to ignore. Sort of like explaining bad kerning to someone, then never being able to ignore it in the future.

[Image: Screen-Shot-2015-03-17-at-9.42.15-AM.png]


But it's not all about looks. I really liked how the game used the combat models out of combat, reinforcing a continuity of deign lacking in VII. I liked the introductory premise, that of an elite mercenary academy. I liked having giant and cool looking 'Fuck You!' summons available right from the start.





But not just that, I really enjoyed the characters. More so than probably anything else, Squall and his journey spoke to me. It wasn't his goofy hair, that trying-so-hard-to-be-cool short jacket and pants with the unnecessary belts, his obnoxiously large Griever pendant, or his utterly impractical and nonsensical Gunblade; I was drawn to his story and character. Squall had issues, but he had really humanizing issues, he had issues that I personally could relate to. He was not what anyone would call a 'people person', but he was smart and capable, and found himself reluctantly thrust into positions of leadership that he often chaffed at or outright pushed back against. He's an introvert, one who puts on a brave face to hide that he's a big old softy with abandonment issues; he doesn't want anyone to get close for fear of losing them again.

Rinoa is introduced almost as your typical manic-pixie-dream-girl, but she's really not, there is so much more to her. She genuinely cares, cares so much it hurts, for the lives and well being of those around her and most especially her friends (even if she's really naive about it). She rejects her inherited privileged, but she's certainly not a misery tourist, she really is rebelling to do the right thing as she sees it. Their budding relationship is awkward and at times confrontational, but also really sweet and endearing; much like Squall's relationship with his fellow Balamb Garden compatriots. The amateur night rock concert at Fisherman's Horizon his teammates preform in an effort to get Squall and Rinoa to 'hook up' is so saccharin as to give you diabetes, and yet will still make you cringe as everyone's earnestness collides with the awkwardly held facade Squall uses to mask his own emotional turmoil.

[Image: hqdefault.jpg]

Yeah, they both do stupid thing, but young people in love often do. When Squall got 'killed' at the end of disc 1, I was all in. When Rinoa got captured by Ultimecia, I was all in. When Squall picked up and hauled off the recovering up unconscious Rinoa on his back, choosing to forsake everything else for the woman he loved and feared he might never see again? I was all in. And what is the denouement, after Rinoa is restored and she attempts to sacrifice herself to save everyone else? After Squall manages to save her from herself? They reach out across the void of space to one another, and hug. Squall could finally be honest with himself and his feelings, and they both knew that. No gratuitous or sex or awkward making out, just a quiet tender moment with each other, floating up in space.

I liked Zell's brash exuberance and temper, Selphie's unbridled enthusiasm, Quistis' calm composer and air of confidence, and Irvine's juvenile womanizing. Zell just has a zest for life and is a real try-hard, but he always means for the best and never lets his failures hold him back. Selphie is the team's unrepentant cheer leader, used to help lift up others, but also as a real barometer of 'shit getting real' whenever even her spirit manages to get dulled. Irvine's bravado is, much like Squall's stoicism, a mask he wears to hide his own fragile insecurities; including him alone being privy the the memories of the shared past they all had in Edea's orphanage. Quistis is perhaps the most tragic of the bunch, as she harbors an unrequited love for Squall, something she was never able to act upon as his superior and instructor; falling instead into a more motherly or big sister role for the entire group.

That's probably why it works, because it isn't really a 'save the world' story, it's a love story. Sure, you do eventually save the world (and also, the space-time continuum), but you either care or you don't because of the love story. This also has a lot to do with why my favorite Dragon Age game is 2, as that one played out like classic Greek tragedy, but it was backed by arguably Bioware's most compelling supporting cast. A lot of that was made possible by it's tighter narrative focus, itself made possible by having the most limited character creation options for that series, allowing Bioware to flesh out the protagonist Hawke much more like a traditional JRPG character (or even an establish protagonist, like Geralt of Rivea from The Witcher series) as opposed to the many blank slates of the original Dragon Age. Also, Hawke isn't a destined or prophesied hero or any of that Joseph Campbell mono-myth/hero's journey malarkey. I cared more about my Hawke than I ever did my Commander Shepard. I just find Squall to be one of the more interesting protagonists from any JRPG I've played, right up there with the immortal Kaim (Lost Odyssey).


[Image: hqdefault.jpg]


Also, Squall didn't have to suffer through a contrived scenario where he had to let Rinoa die because he suddenly forgot how Phoenix Downs work.


Hell, I even really liked the bits when you lose consciousness and come to as Laguna, Kiros, and Ward. How those flashbacks are used not only as a sort of mysterious exposition, but also as a means to compare and contrast against Squall and his compatriots as they progress through the story. Plus, they didn't just leave that thread dangling either, as Squall and Laguna do eventually meet face to face. While not stated explicitly, I thought it was clever how Laguna was most probably Squall's father. Having been raised in Edea Kramer's orphanage where Ellone had ended up (Squall also called her 'big sis'), after her mother Raine had given birth to Laguna's child and subsequently died.

Also, Triple Triad is the shit. I enjoyed Pazaak in Knight of the Old Republic, and Gwent in Witcher III is popular enough to warrant it's own stand-alone game. But for my money, Triple Triad is the best, and owes a lot of that to it's speed, simplicity, and ubiquity. Lots of NPC's could be played, different regions had slightly different house rules to mix things up, but it was still fundamentally the same basic game that you could play with a customizable deck of your own. Getting every card, especially the unique and powerful summons, because a game unto itself.


Fuck it, I'm digging out my PSP, and I'm going to play Final Fantasy VIII again.




(25-06-2017 03:55 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  That video series is interesting, and the points made in it might explain why I think XV is a step in the right direction. Completely new combat system that's not menu-driven, more focus on discovery, and while the story isn't the best FF story I've seen, it's not half-bad, and they are still expanding it through DLC as well. The biggest flaws of the game, IMHO, is the amount of 'dead' time you are just driving, or walking, or riding chocobos. They would've done better with faster transportation and shrinking the map. They did stumble on the story, according to some, because the way the story was 'edited' confused some people, but I didn't have that problem. Apparently in an update they swapped some scenes in the game to 'correct' that. The Boss battles were pretty much impossible to lose, which stinks. Lastly, the last ~20% of the game (by time spent playing) is far too linear for my liking, but they even improved that post-release as well. Despite all of that I still Platinum Trophied the game, the only PS4 game which I have, so overall I still thought it was fantastic. If you abandoned JRPGS in favor of Western RPGs, I think it's worth checking out. It's much closer to Fallout or Elder Scrolls than FFVIII in terms of game play. I think you'd call it a 'Western RPG' based on the provided video.


I'll play it as soon as they port it to PC. Supposedly they have a build in-house running and playable on PC, in particular they had a rig with dual nVidia GTX 1080Ti's in SLI, and with settings (like draw distance and screen resolution) jacked up way beyond the PS4 settings, and running at a buttery smooth 60FPS.

That being said, if they hand you a predefined character in FFXXV, it's probably not a Western RPG. If the game limits your freedom of expression by supplying a rigidly predefined protagonist in order to tell a particular story, that places it firmly in the JRPG territory. The key aspect of the Western RPG isn't just their experimentation with combat mechanics, it's their emphasis on player choice and expression. This is how a game like The Witcher 3 skirts the line but still falls on the side of the Western RPG divide, because they allow for player choice and expression, but through the already established Geralt of Rivia. It works for them, and it makes that game's central romantic dilemma possible; it simply wouldn't have worked as well with an entirely blank slate character (i.e. Commander Shepard in Mass Effect, the Warden Commander in Dragon Age).





[Image: E3WvRwZ.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
09-07-2017, 06:41 PM
RE: Steam summer sale.
I bought Rocket League for $20 and today bought Shadow of Mordor for only $4. Unfortunately I need 40 something gigabytes free to play Shadow of Mordor, but damn that's a good deal.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
15-07-2017, 10:22 AM
RE: Steam summer sale.
(26-06-2017 12:39 AM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  
(25-06-2017 03:55 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  For me VIII was the weakest FF among what I would call the 'Golden Age' of FF games. Still fun. Still enjoyed it. But for my money it was not as good as V, VI, VII, or IX.

I've started to play through every mainline Final Fantasy, from the first up to IX, but VIII was the only one I ever cared to finish.

Now unlike the others, for me VIII has a lot of nostalgia going for it, as I did encounter that one first when I was much younger; but it left an indelible impression. I can still to this day hum the main Balamb Garden theme, and just hearing it again makes me feel happy. Aw man, those harp chords and bell chimes, hits me right in the feels.






I still think is has the best opening score.






Final Fantasy VII didn't do much for me. Even by the standards of it's own time, I didn't think it looked all that great. The style they used just didn't work for me. I can appreciate the throw-back appeal of the chibi proportioned models being used in the over world, but that made it contrast even more with the battle models. Plus the game relies predominately on flat shaded polygons, not textured one (also they're just floating in space, the vertices at the joints are not connected). I came to FFVII after playing one of the best looking PSOne games, Metal Gear Solid, and FFVII looks down right archaic in comparison.

Here are some screenshots to highlight what I'm talking about.

[Image: e75c479302.jpg]

The only texture on Tifa is her eyes, the rest of the model just has flat shaded polygons. Also it's very clear that her upper arm and shoulder are not connected to her torso, but rather just floating in the space next to it; they are separate objects. The models in FFVII are not a single contiguous polygon mesh, but rather a series of smaller pieces all floating close to each other to approximate being connected, but they're not.

Now compare that to FFVIII and Metal Gear Solid.

[Image: gfs_50281_2_41_mid.jpg]

[Image: gfs_58122_2_3.jpg]

Single contiguous models, with texture maps. This stuff irked me when I was kid, and going to college for Game Art & Design didn't change that; it just made it easier to both quantify and explain, and conversely that much harder to ignore. Sort of like explaining bad kerning to someone, then never being able to ignore it in the future.

[Image: Screen-Shot-2015-03-17-at-9.42.15-AM.png]


But it's not all about looks. I really liked how the game used the combat models out of combat, reinforcing a continuity of deign lacking in VII. I liked the introductory premise, that of an elite mercenary academy. I liked having giant and cool looking 'Fuck You!' summons available right from the start.





But not just that, I really enjoyed the characters. More so than probably anything else, Squall and his journey spoke to me. It wasn't his goofy hair, that trying-so-hard-to-be-cool short jacket and pants with the unnecessary belts, his obnoxiously large Griever pendant, or his utterly impractical and nonsensical Gunblade; I was drawn to his story and character. Squall had issues, but he had really humanizing issues, he had issues that I personally could relate to. He was not what anyone would call a 'people person', but he was smart and capable, and found himself reluctantly thrust into positions of leadership that he often chaffed at or outright pushed back against. He's an introvert, one who puts on a brave face to hide that he's a big old softy with abandonment issues; he doesn't want anyone to get close for fear of losing them again.

Rinoa is introduced almost as your typical manic-pixie-dream-girl, but she's really not, there is so much more to her. She genuinely cares, cares so much it hurts, for the lives and well being of those around her and most especially her friends (even if she's really naive about it). She rejects her inherited privileged, but she's certainly not a misery tourist, she really is rebelling to do the right thing as she sees it. Their budding relationship is awkward and at times confrontational, but also really sweet and endearing; much like Squall's relationship with his fellow Balamb Garden compatriots. The amateur night rock concert at Fisherman's Horizon his teammates preform in an effort to get Squall and Rinoa to 'hook up' is so saccharin as to give you diabetes, and yet will still make you cringe as everyone's earnestness collides with the awkwardly held facade Squall uses to mask his own emotional turmoil.

[Image: hqdefault.jpg]

Yeah, they both do stupid thing, but young people in love often do. When Squall got 'killed' at the end of disc 1, I was all in. When Rinoa got captured by Ultimecia, I was all in. When Squall picked up and hauled off the recovering up unconscious Rinoa on his back, choosing to forsake everything else for the woman he loved and feared he might never see again? I was all in. And what is the denouement, after Rinoa is restored and she attempts to sacrifice herself to save everyone else? After Squall manages to save her from herself? They reach out across the void of space to one another, and hug. Squall could finally be honest with himself and his feelings, and they both knew that. No gratuitous or sex or awkward making out, just a quiet tender moment with each other, floating up in space.

I liked Zell's brash exuberance and temper, Selphie's unbridled enthusiasm, Quistis' calm composer and air of confidence, and Irvine's juvenile womanizing. Zell just has a zest for life and is a real try-hard, but he always means for the best and never lets his failures hold him back. Selphie is the team's unrepentant cheer leader, used to help lift up others, but also as a real barometer of 'shit getting real' whenever even her spirit manages to get dulled. Irvine's bravado is, much like Squall's stoicism, a mask he wears to hide his own fragile insecurities; including him alone being privy the the memories of the shared past they all had in Edea's orphanage. Quistis is perhaps the most tragic of the bunch, as she harbors an unrequited love for Squall, something she was never able to act upon as his superior and instructor; falling instead into a more motherly or big sister role for the entire group.

That's probably why it works, because it isn't really a 'save the world' story, it's a love story. Sure, you do eventually save the world (and also, the space-time continuum), but you either care or you don't because of the love story. This also has a lot to do with why my favorite Dragon Age game is 2, as that one played out like classic Greek tragedy, but it was backed by arguably Bioware's most compelling supporting cast. A lot of that was made possible by it's tighter narrative focus, itself made possible by having the most limited character creation options for that series, allowing Bioware to flesh out the protagonist Hawke much more like a traditional JRPG character (or even an establish protagonist, like Geralt of Rivea from The Witcher series) as opposed to the many blank slates of the original Dragon Age. Also, Hawke isn't a destined or prophesied hero or any of that Joseph Campbell mono-myth/hero's journey malarkey. I cared more about my Hawke than I ever did my Commander Shepard. I just find Squall to be one of the more interesting protagonists from any JRPG I've played, right up there with the immortal Kaim (Lost Odyssey).


[Image: hqdefault.jpg]


Also, Squall didn't have to suffer through a contrived scenario where he had to let Rinoa die because he suddenly forgot how Phoenix Downs work.


Hell, I even really liked the bits when you lose consciousness and come to as Laguna, Kiros, and Ward. How those flashbacks are used not only as a sort of mysterious exposition, but also as a means to compare and contrast against Squall and his compatriots as they progress through the story. Plus, they didn't just leave that thread dangling either, as Squall and Laguna do eventually meet face to face. While not stated explicitly, I thought it was clever how Laguna was most probably Squall's father. Having been raised in Edea Kramer's orphanage where Ellone had ended up (Squall also called her 'big sis'), after her mother Raine had given birth to Laguna's child and subsequently died.

Also, Triple Triad is the shit. I enjoyed Pazaak in Knight of the Old Republic, and Gwent in Witcher III is popular enough to warrant it's own stand-alone game. But for my money, Triple Triad is the best, and owes a lot of that to it's speed, simplicity, and ubiquity. Lots of NPC's could be played, different regions had slightly different house rules to mix things up, but it was still fundamentally the same basic game that you could play with a customizable deck of your own. Getting every card, especially the unique and powerful summons, because a game unto itself.


Fuck it, I'm digging out my PSP, and I'm going to play Final Fantasy VIII again.




(25-06-2017 03:55 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  That video series is interesting, and the points made in it might explain why I think XV is a step in the right direction. Completely new combat system that's not menu-driven, more focus on discovery, and while the story isn't the best FF story I've seen, it's not half-bad, and they are still expanding it through DLC as well. The biggest flaws of the game, IMHO, is the amount of 'dead' time you are just driving, or walking, or riding chocobos. They would've done better with faster transportation and shrinking the map. They did stumble on the story, according to some, because the way the story was 'edited' confused some people, but I didn't have that problem. Apparently in an update they swapped some scenes in the game to 'correct' that. The Boss battles were pretty much impossible to lose, which stinks. Lastly, the last ~20% of the game (by time spent playing) is far too linear for my liking, but they even improved that post-release as well. Despite all of that I still Platinum Trophied the game, the only PS4 game which I have, so overall I still thought it was fantastic. If you abandoned JRPGS in favor of Western RPGs, I think it's worth checking out. It's much closer to Fallout or Elder Scrolls than FFVIII in terms of game play. I think you'd call it a 'Western RPG' based on the provided video.


I'll play it as soon as they port it to PC. Supposedly they have a build in-house running and playable on PC, in particular they had a rig with dual nVidia GTX 1080Ti's in SLI, and with settings (like draw distance and screen resolution) jacked up way beyond the PS4 settings, and running at a buttery smooth 60FPS.

That being said, if they hand you a predefined character in FFXXV, it's probably not a Western RPG. If the game limits your freedom of expression by supplying a rigidly predefined protagonist in order to tell a particular story, that places it firmly in the JRPG territory. The key aspect of the Western RPG isn't just their experimentation with combat mechanics, it's their emphasis on player choice and expression. This is how a game like The Witcher 3 skirts the line but still falls on the side of the Western RPG divide, because they allow for player choice and expression, but through the already established Geralt of Rivia. It works for them, and it makes that game's central romantic dilemma possible; it simply wouldn't have worked as well with an entirely blank slate character (i.e. Commander Shepard in Mass Effect, the Warden Commander in Dragon Age).





Got busy, and then my two-year old destroyed my laptop keyboard, so I intended to reply long ago. Just spent 5 hours replacing my keyboard (and now have no audio). Anyhow, I think you are nuts for saying the graphics sucked for a game of it's time. One of the biggest factors in VII's success was it's graphics. No one had ever done cinematics the way VII did. It was absolutely ground-breaking. The music was also a huge part of it's success. It laid the groundwork for what was possible in VIII and IX. VII was an early PS1 release. For it's time, what you saw was unbelievable. One lasting memory is snowboarding down the mountain as Cloud and having an adult family member (in their 20's at the time) remark, mouth agape, that we were close to being able to blur the lines between movies and video games. Sounds silly looking at it now, but it was special. But, even if you want to be cynical and commit the historian's fallacy, the graphics were not what made the game what it was, it was only a piece of the tapestry. What made it great was the content. The main story, the never-ending backstories and sidestories, the mini-games, the legendary items you could acquire, the 'extra' characters, and so on and so on. You invested time and emotion into the story in a way that was not before possible. As the console matured, Square, and others learned how to push the console further, and stretch the hardware to it's limits. Yes, VIII looked better, and IX better still, but the graphics were not the primary reason I kept giving Square my money. But I will also admit to having bias toward VII as that was my first love-affair with a true RPG. After that I went on to play some of other, then current, RPGs like Legend of Legaia, Grandia, Chrono Cross, and eventually went back and played some older ones, and though there were many I loved, VII does hold a special place of nostalgia in my heart, and like you, I can instantly recall and play many of it's songs in my head (though I can do that for VIII as well).

As an afterthought, the mini-games in VII were more diverse, and had many more in raw numbers too. At least half of them sucked, but there were some that kept you playing for hours. The bad thing is you had to make a special trip to play most of them. If I had to choose a winner, it would be tough (loved the Battle Arena), but I guess I'd give the edge to VIII for that one. I even think the card game in VIII was better than IX's version to be fair.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Dark Light's post
15-07-2017, 12:26 PM (This post was last modified: 15-07-2017 12:37 PM by EvolutionKills.)
RE: Steam summer sale.
(15-07-2017 10:22 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  Anyhow, I think you are nuts for saying the graphics sucked for a game of it's time. One of the biggest factors in VII's success was it's graphics. No one had ever done cinematics the way VII did. It was absolutely ground-breaking.

Coming from the 16-bit era, it was impressive. But seeing it after already being exposed to it's own direct sequel, and other PSone visual powerhouses like Metal Gear Solid? Yeah, FFVII is a rough looking game. Innovative and groundbreaking from a technical perspective (you know, just like Wave Race 64 was), but all of it's visual fidelity breakthroughs were surpassed by Final Fantasy VIII, and I played that one first.

[Image: Wave-Race-64.jpg]

I can appreciate that it set a technical and visual precedent, but FFVIII surpassed it in that regard. Looking back and comparing the two, from a pure technical aesthetic, FFVIII holds up better in most regards.


(15-07-2017 10:22 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  The music was also a huge part of it's success. It laid the groundwork for what was possible in VIII and IX.

Indeed, CD quality audio was an advantage that the PSone had over the earlier 16-bit era. But the composer of the score for FFVII, Nobuo Uematsu, composed music for every mainline Final Fantasy title before it and since. The man is a brilliant composer, but being limited to 16-bit era MIDI tunes hardly dampened his creativity. The PSone could handle better quality audio, but the Final Fantasy series already had brilliant music before FFVII.










(15-07-2017 10:22 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  VII was an early PS1 release. For it's time, what you saw was unbelievable. One lasting memory is snowboarding down the mountain as Cloud and having an adult family member (in their 20's at the time) remark, mouth agape, that we were close to being able to blur the lines between movies and video games. Sounds silly looking at it now, but it was special.

Right, and that rose tinted nostalgia was absolutely lost on me. I can appreciate it for what it is and it's place in the gaming cannon and it's contributions to the medium and it's rightful place in history. But I personally have no special fondness for it. It was not my first PSone Final Fantasy, or my first Final Fantasy, or even my first Squaresoft title.


(15-07-2017 10:22 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  But, even if you want to be cynical and commit the historian's fallacy, the graphics were not what made the game what it was, it was only a piece of the tapestry. What made it great was the content. The main story, the never-ending backstories and sidestories, the mini-games, the legendary items you could acquire, the 'extra' characters, and so on and so on. You invested time and emotion into the story in a way that was not before possible.

And I'd argue that all of those things had already been done before, in prior Final Fantasy titles. What made FFVII special, and a cultural touchstone, was precisely it's moment in time. At the moment, it was visually impressive, more so than prior titles. But the story and content? In that regards, it does not surpass what had been done before it. Prior games had well written and interesting stories and characters, and often it's Final Fantasy 2/IV's and Final Fantasy 3/VI's stories that are held up as exemplars of the genre. They had the same exploration, diverse supporting cast (FFVI had a Yeti, Umaro), sweeping stories, legendary equipment, hidden bosses, and other secrets. Final Fantasy VII built upon it's already well established genre tropes; VII was not at all a massive departure for the series.

What made Final Fantasy VII distinct was that it was an impressive piece of tech, on a platform that reached people who otherwise wouldn't of had a Nintendo console. It exposed Final Fantasy, an up to that point Nintendo exclusive series, to a wider audience. It's these unique aspects that set it apart, but it's these same aspects that date the game rather than make it timeless. It's popularity and wider cultural cache is a direct product of its time and place. It was the first FF game on a non-Nintendo platform, and it made impressive use of FMV at the time; and for many people, that is precisely why it was their first (and most fondly remembered) Final Fantasy title.

That's not meant as a dig at you or to undermine your own appreciation of the title, just an attempt to explain why FFVII casts such a disproportionately large shadow over the collective cultural consciousness.


(15-07-2017 10:22 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  As the console matured, Square, and others learned how to push the console further, and stretch the hardware to it's limits. Yes, VIII looked better, and IX better still, but the graphics were not the primary reason I kept giving Square my money. But I will also admit to having bias toward VII as that was my first love-affair with a true RPG. After that I went on to play some of other, then current, RPGs like Legend of Legaia, Grandia, Chrono Cross, and eventually went back and played some older ones, and though there were many I loved, VII does hold a special place of nostalgia in my heart, and like you, I can instantly recall and play many of it's songs in my head (though I can do that for VIII as well).

For me, that's probably Chrono Trigger. It was an exemplar of it's genre at it's time, and I'll always remember it fondly as one of my earliest JRPG experiences.


(15-07-2017 10:22 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  As an afterthought, the mini-games in VII were more diverse, and had many more in raw numbers too. At least half of them sucked, but there were some that kept you playing for hours. The bad thing is you had to make a special trip to play most of them. If I had to choose a winner, it would be tough (loved the Battle Arena), but I guess I'd give the edge to VIII for that one. I even think the card game in VIII was better than IX's version to be fair.

Triple Triad > Pazaak > Gwent

Tongue

[Image: E3WvRwZ.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: