Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
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11-05-2013, 05:37 AM
Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
China News Service, Changchun, May 10th. The First Modern Tram Engineering and Technology Convention of China was held today in Changchun, Jilin Province, with more than 200 related officials from government agencies all over country and industry experts gathered together discussing the future possible achievements of the tram transportation. They reached in consensus that "modern tramway is going to be among the most popular way of city transportation".

The latest data show that an investment of over 200 billion yuan is expected (32 billion U.S. dollars) in hundreds of tramway routes from 2012 to 2020, which add up to more than 2000 kilometers (1242 miles). These low-carbon, convenient and smart streetcars can coexist with the current streets and bus lanes of the cities, and are able to be entirely "designed and made in China", whose technology of manufacturing tramway cars is among the top of this area around the world.

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11-05-2013, 06:07 AM
RE: Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
Rail systems have a lot going for them in low carbon economies, both light rail and heavy rail. Light rail roughly being your trams (able to stop in the distance they can see) and trains needing a signal to warn them of obstacles ahead in order to stop in time.

Many western cities tore up their tram networks with the advent of the car, but a few cities still retain them and many cities have moved in the last couple of decades to put them back in.

As for rolling stock (the actual trains and trams) China has been making rolling stock for quite some time and some of the best comes from China. China is also one of the biggest consumers of rail in the world, especially new rail.

That said, there have been problems as you'll have seen in the high speed rail system. Given the pace of industrialisation many of the people responsible for safety and the like are younger and less experienced than their counterparts in other parts of the world. The Chinese safety industry is still on a fairly steep learning curve.

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11-05-2013, 10:48 AM
RE: Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
Just a tip, giving us links entirely in Chinese is pointless considering next to nobody can read Chinese here.

On topic though, this is the good thing about China. Your guys ability to get shit done is amazing (helped by a lack of human rights). Your public transport, and in particular future public transport, is fucking awesome. It truly reflects on your country that your government is mostly made up of engineers, not politicians.

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11-05-2013, 11:28 AM
RE: Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
There needs to be more public transport here in the U.S. We could learn a thing or 2 from places in Europe and China. Alas, there'll never be a shortage of people who feel the need to drive their 4x4 Diesel powered Dodge 2 blocks to the supermarket like there's a mountain that needs to be scaled to get there Undecided

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12-05-2013, 05:36 AM
RE: Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
@earmuffs - If you use chrome it translates it for you automatically Wink

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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13-05-2013, 08:12 PM (This post was last modified: 13-05-2013 08:32 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
(12-05-2013 05:36 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  @earmuffs - If you use chrome it translates it for you automatically Wink

To be fair, it's hard to interpret the translation. I gather we are talking about this: Siemens transfers low-floor tram technology to Chinese manufacturer. Yes?

So China's investing heavily in public infrastructure and education while the USA hides its money under the mattress. This don't bode well.

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13-05-2013, 08:36 PM
RE: Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
(13-05-2013 08:12 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  Still hard to interpret the translation, though. I gather we are talking about this: Siemens transfers low-floor tram technology to Chinese manufacturer. Yes?

That's news to me. Interesting because in the news they said the technology was Chinese ... Seemingly originally German.

(13-05-2013 08:12 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  So China's investing heavily in public infrastructure and education while the USA hides its money under the mattress. This don't bode well.

This is because of the difference of political structure. It's easier for China to gather resources and focus on major projects with the side effects of the over-largeness of administration power and a much higher corruption rate(no data at hand, somebody please help?). The U.S. has a system that seems much fairer. Yet when it comes to public investments which may be irrelevant to or against some major corporate entities' benefits? "That's a total waste of taxpayer's money", they may argue.

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14-05-2013, 05:53 AM (This post was last modified: 14-05-2013 05:56 AM by Hafnof.)
RE: Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
Girly,

I think the article in the OP is just reporting on a conference of tram people who got together and concluded that trams are the way of the future.

CSR have been making rolling stock for quite some time, both locally in China and worldwide. I think the article you are pointing to just says that CSR bought a product line from Siemens in 2012.

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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14-05-2013, 06:48 PM
RE: Streetcars, a "new" option for future main-strain city transportation in China.
(13-05-2013 08:36 PM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  
(13-05-2013 08:12 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  Still hard to interpret the translation, though. I gather we are talking about this: Siemens transfers low-floor tram technology to Chinese manufacturer. Yes?

That's news to me. Interesting because in the news they said the technology was Chinese ... Seemingly originally German.

I can't bring myself to see technology from a nationalistic perspective. Technology is a human thing that's got nothing to do with nationalism. The application of any technology will require expert local engineering regardless of its source. Shit even the source selection of a particular technology requires expert engineering. I mean hell the Arabs invented algebra, don't mean the Christians don't use it. Tongue

(13-05-2013 08:36 PM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  
(13-05-2013 08:12 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  So China's investing heavily in public infrastructure and education while the USA hides its money under the mattress. This don't bode well.

This is because of the difference of political structure. It's easier for China to gather resources and focus on major projects with the side effects of the over-largeness of administration power and a much higher corruption rate(no data at hand, somebody please help?).

The "over-largeness" of Government I can see, but I'm skeptical about the higher corruption rate. Seems to me that the corruption rate among Chinese Government Officials should be much lower than in the USA given that the penalties are much greater (sentenced to death vs. losing my job).

(13-05-2013 08:36 PM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  The U.S. has a system that seems much fairer.

Girly's not at all convinced of that, HU.

(13-05-2013 08:36 PM)HU.Junyuan Wrote:  Yet when it comes to public investments which may be irrelevant to or against some major corporate entities' benefits? "That's a total waste of taxpayer's money", they may argue.

Exactly. Like weapons systems that the DoD says are outdated and unnecessary but because they create jobs in local jurisdictions they are untouchable.

(14-05-2013 05:53 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  Girly,

I think the article in the OP is just reporting on a conference of tram people who got together and concluded that trams are the way of the future.

CSR have been making rolling stock for quite some time, both locally in China and worldwide. I think the article you are pointing to just says that CSR bought a product line from Siemens in 2012.

It would surprise me if the cooperative agreement with Siemens and China's apparent commitment to a light rail system are unrelated.

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