Suggestions for taking up programming?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
17-08-2014, 04:24 PM
RE: Suggestions for taking up programming?
Actually, Cobol programmers are some of the highest paid now. Nobody knows it anymore, and they need people to maintain their legacy software Tongue.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
17-08-2014, 05:13 PM
RE: Suggestions for taking up programming?
(12-08-2014 09:21 AM)Taro Wrote:  I minor in linguistics and I'm thinking about getting into computational linguistics professionally later on.

All the cunning linguists I worked with used a programming language called Prolog. For symbolic Artificial Intelligence and Computational Linguistics Prolog's used more in Europe whereas Lisp is used more in America. They're both declarative languages. This means that you just declare statements without specifying the order in which they are executed.

Functional programming is another form of declarative programming which takes the concept of mathematical functions built from smaller functions.

Procedural languages (including object oriented) is more commonly used in industry though and require you to specify the order that a set of steps are executed in. This is more akin to what people think of as an algorithm.

Professional computational linguists in industry will need to know how to program in both Prolog or Lisp as well as an object oriented language.

Python is a good language for natural scientists because it has a large library of functions that can be used and can result in very clean code.

Software engineering predominantly uses object oriented programming. So you would use C++ if performance was essential (e.g. for writing a game, or simulation), or Java or C# for enterprise scale systems.

The best way to learn to program is to start programming. So maybe the question should be, what is the first thing that you'd want to program?


Protip: If you do get a job as a computational linguist, look up and memorise the correct use of a semi colon. I once watched as four computational linguists argued vehemently about its correct usage for about half an hour. It wasn't pretty. It wasted half our tea break.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like Mathilda's post
17-08-2014, 05:48 PM
RE: Suggestions for taking up programming?
(17-08-2014 05:13 PM)Mathilda Wrote:  The best way to learn to program is to start programming.

Exactly!!!!! Best advice in this thread!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes jockmcdock's post
18-08-2014, 07:53 AM
RE: Suggestions for taking up programming?
i feel like this thread is already becoming crowded with ideas and suggestions, so rather than offering those I would ask you what you already know, what got you interested, and what you would like to achieve.

For example, are you looking to better understand the relationship between human and machine languages? Are you a devotee of Uncle Noam[1] and want to understand how his work on grammar influenced computer science? Are you strictly asking as a hobbyist who has a project or two in mind that you would like to have a go at? Are you asking with a specific job or task in mind? Are you coming from a strong mathematical background, and if so how would you describe that background?

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noam_Chomsky

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
18-08-2014, 12:21 PM
RE: Suggestions for taking up programming?
Wow Ohmy. Okay you guys gave me a lot of starting points, thank you! I will check out those edx and coursera courses as soon as they start. Well since I opened this thread I had a look at some of those programming languages, especially Java. I like it a lot so far.

Quote:For example, are you looking to better understand the relationship between human and machine languages? Are you a devotee of Uncle Noam[1] and want to understand how his work on grammar influenced computer science? Are you strictly asking as a hobbyist who has a project or two in mind that you would like to have a go at? Are you asking with a specific job or task in mind? Are you coming from a strong mathematical background, and if so how would you describe that background?

As I said I'd love to get into computational linguistics later on, but there are other areas I can see myself working in, so it doesn't have to be confined to that. My interest was sparked when some of my linguistics profs were offering student assistant jobs for someone with some knowledge of programming (I think they mentioned R and Python), for work in a project related to semantics and typology. That project sounded very interesting and I was kinda regretful not having taken up programming before Undecided.

I don't especially have a strong mathematical background, but I really started to like math since I got out of school Smile. I aced my logic course last semester and I'll take one in statistics for linguists next Semester (they will introduce R as well). For now I'm just trying to get the basics to see whether programming is at all something I'd want to do professionally.

Quote:All the cunning linguists I worked with used a programming language called Prolog. For symbolic Artificial Intelligence and Computational Linguistics Prolog's used more in Europe whereas Lisp is used more in America. They're both declarative languages. This means that you just declare statements without specifying the order in which they are executed.

Just had a look at it! It looks a lot like predicate logic Shy. I will definitely check that out!

[Image: panda_0077.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
18-08-2014, 01:24 PM
RE: Suggestions for taking up programming?
Hmmm, I'd say it depends on what you wanted to do. My first course was visual basic in Highschool, and it was so natural, straight forward, and fun for me that it actually veered me off from a math path (hah) into a CS route in college.

If possible, I'd recommend just taking the introductory CS classes at your university or college. Self learning is great, but you will probably have spotty knowledge that is very specific vs broad.

The thing about programming is...once you "get it", you can easily learn most languages.

If there is something specific that you wanted to do, I would say search the net for what the best language is for that effort, and focus on that.

I prefer fantasy, but I have to live in reality.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
23-08-2014, 02:18 PM
RE: Suggestions for taking up programming?
I have a suggestion. What about the Wolfram language? Looks like the next hot thing - program everything with just a line or two of code. It's going to be a part of Unity 3D, which is cool. Yay, videogames! Also, it's 25 years in development.





http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/21270..._Unity.php
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: