Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
06-03-2013, 12:59 PM (This post was last modified: 06-03-2013 03:03 PM by Peanut.)
Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
I'm gonna go ahead and stick this in the science section because I couldn't figure out where else to put it.









I saw this on my Facebook news feed yesterday. At first, I was like, "What the HELL is this? Who put that baby in the water and is letting him cry like that?" But then I continued to watch and then I watched it once more... That baby was able to save himself in a simulated drowning incident. It could happen to anyone's child in the blink of an eye.

Why not teach babies to save themselves? I think this was overall a wonderful demonstration video and I can only hope that it can be taught to every child. I'm aware that most babies are able to swim upon entering the water for the first time at only a few months old, but this seemed entirely different to me.

He actually called out for "help." It was amazing. I won't lie and say that it didn't hurt my heart and make me think of my own son in that position. He totally used to have an Onesie like that one. Undecided But I see the benefits of teaching young children to do things for themselves at an early age in times of crisis.

Sometimes, I grapple with telling my son about natural disasters, too. The other day, he was asking about hurricanes and tornadoes. I ended up briefly explaining to him what one should do if a tornado were to ever touch down by our house. He was amazed. (He also asked how he could save our "kitty" during a tornado because "Jameson is a 'scaredy cat,' and he will just hide from me.") I have also told him about calling "9-1-1" if something happened to mommy or if someone tried to get in the house and to also hide. (Heavy stuff for a five year old!) He, of course being the sweet boy he is, says that he will "always protect [me] from the 'bad people.'" Heart I'm still waiting for him to "test it out" and I'm going to get a call back from a concerned emergency dispatcher to see why I "called and hung up."

I taught him our address one day on the walk home from the park. It takes about 10 minutes to walk home, and in that time, my son learned our address. I taught it to him to the tune of a song I can't place. He knows his whole name, mom and dad's name, and he's still learning my phone number. He knows to scream like he's dying if anyone ever tries to take him; He needs to fight, kick and scream and try to scratch the "bad guy." (I watch entirely too much True Crime stories, huh?) I don't sit and go over worst-case scenarios everyday with him, by the way. If he asks, I tell him.

I'm not saying I expect my son to be home alone until he is of a responsible age, though. I'm not saying to go throw your baby or grand baby into a pool and see what happens, either. If emergency preparedness can be taught in a controlled and safe environment, then look into it.

"It was life, often unsatisfying, frequently cruel, usually boring, sometimes beautiful, once in awhile exhilarating." -Stephen King
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-03-2013, 02:58 PM (This post was last modified: 07-03-2013 03:01 PM by Chaos.)
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
That looks pretty rude. Not sure if it is a good idea. Don't you think it could lead to some psychological traumas?
Even though is just a baby, it could remain in his memory for a long time. At least, it doesn't seem to me like a pleasant experience.

"The way to see by faith is to shut the eye of reason." - Benjamin Franklin
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-03-2013, 03:19 PM
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
In a few of the videos I watched, many of the babies were smiling not two seconds after being "rescued." They seemed to be enjoying it, to me.

And the people aren't holding them under water. I'm also sure it's not done for extended periods of time, as babies get restless pretty easily. (Speaking from how my son was as a baby as a reference.)

"It was life, often unsatisfying, frequently cruel, usually boring, sometimes beautiful, once in awhile exhilarating." -Stephen King
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-03-2013, 04:35 PM
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
It's how I learned to swim. Drinking Beverage

A few weeks ago, I took my 7-year-old brother with me to the gym and let him play in the pool. He hasn't yet learned to swim, but I was walking along the outside edge of the pool giving him orders and teaching him how to float; tread water; etc. Then, I took one of the foam noodle thingies and threw it into the middle and told him to "go get it". He looked at me and told me "It's too far!" I said "No it's not. Go get it." I can swim, so he obviously wasn't in any immediate danger, but he was certainly being put in a situation in which he'd either force himself to swim for the safety of the noodle; or he'd go underwater and start coughing. As I knew would happen; he struggled toward the middle; he really started to struggle; he paniced; then he instinctually forced himself to swim across the water - lest he drown. When he got to the noodle, he turned around with a huge smile because he had felt what it was like to swim. It was "Good fuckin' job, kiddo" from me. Now he's slowly learning how to control it effectively.

Sometimes, "swim or die" is an incredibly effective learning tool. Like I said; it's how I did it when I was a kid.

Through profound pain comes profound knowledge.
Ridi, Pagliaccio, sul tuo amore infranto! Ridi del duol, che t'avvelena il cor!
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Misanthropik's post
07-03-2013, 06:05 PM
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
Thanks, Miso Smile

Good contribution.

"It was life, often unsatisfying, frequently cruel, usually boring, sometimes beautiful, once in awhile exhilarating." -Stephen King
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-03-2013, 06:48 PM
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
(07-03-2013 03:19 PM)Peanut Wrote:  In a few of the videos I watched, many of the babies were smiling not two seconds after being "rescued." They seemed to be enjoying it, to me.

And the people aren't holding them under water. I'm also sure it's not done for extended periods of time, as babies get restless pretty easily. (Speaking from how my son was as a baby as a reference.)
Just because the babies were smiling doesn't mean they weren't terrified when they were in the water crying. It's never a good idea to scare a child for the purpose of teaching it something. Least of all terrifying a baby so it can learn not to drown when its parents aren't watching. In simple terms... there should never be a point in time when there's the chance that a baby or a toddler might go near an open body of water. That's what parents are for... to protect the child from danger. This whole notion of terrifying children for their own good is patently false on every level. It does damage to their yet undeveloped brains that is predictable and verifiable. And unlike bruises or broken bones, when our brain development is altered, it doesn't just go away or heal itself. It leaves a permanent neurological broken circuit in the brain and is attributable to myriad adult addictions and mental disorders.

The beginning of wisdom is to call things by their right names. - Chinese Proverb
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-03-2013, 07:09 PM
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
I've read that it's good to start them as infants because they remember being in the watery womb and a bunch of stuff like that. That's just what I read.
I learned how to swim very young and I think if more did you would have a lot less child drownings. Undecided

[Image: i-Jn5RHZ7-S.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes smidgen's post
07-03-2013, 07:14 PM
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
(07-03-2013 06:48 PM)bbeljefe Wrote:  
(07-03-2013 03:19 PM)Peanut Wrote:  In a few of the videos I watched, many of the babies were smiling not two seconds after being "rescued." They seemed to be enjoying it, to me.

And the people aren't holding them under water. I'm also sure it's not done for extended periods of time, as babies get restless pretty easily. (Speaking from how my son was as a baby as a reference.)
Just because the babies were smiling doesn't mean they weren't terrified when they were in the water crying. It's never a good idea to scare a child for the purpose of teaching it something. Least of all terrifying a baby so it can learn not to drown when its parents aren't watching. In simple terms... there should never be a point in time when there's the chance that a baby or a toddler might go near an open body of water. That's what parents are for... to protect the child from danger. This whole notion of terrifying children for their own good is patently false on every level. It does damage to their yet undeveloped brains that is predictable and verifiable. And unlike bruises or broken bones, when our brain development is altered, it doesn't just go away or heal itself. It leaves a permanent neurological broken circuit in the brain and is attributable to myriad adult addictions and mental disorders.
And yet, they'll never drown, AHAAAAAhhhhh. Drinking Beverage

Through profound pain comes profound knowledge.
Ridi, Pagliaccio, sul tuo amore infranto! Ridi del duol, che t'avvelena il cor!
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-03-2013, 07:20 PM
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
(07-03-2013 06:48 PM)bbeljefe Wrote:  In simple terms... there should never be a point in time when there's the chance that a baby or a toddler might go near an open body of water. That's what parents are for... to protect the child from danger.
In the first video, in depicts a simulated incident where a dog opened the slider door and baby found his way outside. It could happen. I don't care how attentive a parent is, shit happens in the blink of an eye.

"It was life, often unsatisfying, frequently cruel, usually boring, sometimes beautiful, once in awhile exhilarating." -Stephen King
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
07-03-2013, 07:25 PM
RE: Survival Instincts and Teaching Techniques to Babies and Young Children
(07-03-2013 07:09 PM)smidgen Wrote:  I've read that it's good to start them as infants because they remember being in the watery womb and a bunch of stuff like that. That's just what I read.
I learned how to swim very young and I think if more did you would have a lot less child drownings. Undecided
It's one thing to teach an infant to swim but it's entirely another to terrify them in the water. And you're right, the time spent in the womb is a long lasting memory for all of us. But the trouble there is that not all wombs were places of comfort and security. Mothers who are stressed or who abuse substances during pregnancy send all those chemicals to the child and it can be a very scary experience. If the mother doesn't eat well, the fetus can suffer from starvation, because it is obviously much more sensitive to a lack of nutrients. The birth process is also a traumatic experience for the infant and if it has suffered the aforementioned traumas, that process can be even more terrifying.

There's a good bit of very compelling evidence that our en utero and birth experiences are the genesis of a lot of the fears we have as adults. The birth experience also mirrors, almost exactly, the common near death experience of being in a tunnel and then emerging to a blindingly bright light. Of course, that light is explained away as entering "God's" world but the more plausible explanation is that is actually the real memory of entering this world.

The beginning of wisdom is to call things by their right names. - Chinese Proverb
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: