Taking Up an Instrument
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23-05-2017, 05:38 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(23-05-2017 11:56 AM)Larai19 Wrote:  
(23-05-2017 04:46 AM)julep Wrote:  Don't wait! Learning violin will help you learn everything better. There's pretty much nothing better that you can do for your brain than work at music.

I play piano, clarinet, flute, and sax, and I also sing. I have a violin but haven't tried to do much with it. Flute and vocal are relatively new to me in terms of serious study, meaning that I came to them as an adult.

I also teach adults and kids to play piano and clarinet. My students range from 4 years old to people in their 60s-70s. Two major differences between adults and kids that I've found are that 1) adults have to learn patience with their skill-development speed, and 2) adults have to develop their own practice ethic, as they don't have parents requiring them to practice. Adults tend to progress faster, actually, in the beginning of music study than most kids, but they feel more frustrated with the learning process. Adults tend to assume that if they understand what they're supposed to do, they should be able to do it quickly, and they underestimate the time things will take to sink into their muscles. You can slow down muscle memory by not practicing, but you can't speed it up to instantaneous.

Once you get past the beginning, there are some differences between adults' and kids' brains and fingers, it's true. Adults may have to use other strategies or approach things differently than they did when they were kids. For example, when I started studying singing formally and then began singing in an acapella group, I found that I had to do a lot more performing from memory. When I was a kid, I could memorize most music the first or second time through, but that ability had diminished over time. I had to work much harder, especially at first, to memorize the scores--but I kept at it and now I'm pretty fast at getting a new piece off book.

TL/DR: With patience and effort, you can learn to play an instrument at any age.

Good luck!

I would be learning the violin from scratch. I'm enchanted by the music but I german and chess studies... Do you think I could manage all three? Huh

Yes. You don't have to work equally hard at each one all the time, and when you get frustrated or overwhelmed by one and need time for your back brain to process it, you can shift more attention to the others.
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23-05-2017, 05:45 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(23-05-2017 01:12 AM)Larai19 Wrote:  I have been considering taking up the violin.

I have read some articles about the correlation between those who play music with an increase in motor-skills, neuroplasticity, and prevention of degenerative diesases. I've seen that there are many benefits to learning how to play an instrument.
I have decided if I pick up the hobby I will do it after I've successfully finished becoming fluent in German.

How many of you play an instrument?
Do any of you play the violin?
Do any of you have an experience with learning how to play an instrument out of your child years and adolescence?

I play a few. I don't play violin (at least not well enough to say that I play it), but I do play double bass, cello, and mandolin, all of which share something in common with the violin. As a child I was given piano lessons from an insanely early age; I took up a band instrument (clarinet) in 4th grade; and finally found my main axe (guitar) when I was 12. Outside of that, every instrument I've learned has been as an adult.

My advice would be:

* Make sure you have a decent instrument. Doesn't have to be a Strad, but whatever it is should be well set-up (a luthier can do this for you).
A lot of beginners are discouraged by instruments that are essentilally unplayable.

* Try to develop a good grounding in basic music theory, which can be done while you're learning an instrument.
If you do that, you will find (as I did) than many things carry over from one area to another.

* Don't underestimate the value of getting a good teacher -- especially when you're first starting out.
They can help you avoid a lot of false starts and dead ends, and make your practice time far more productive.

* Find some music that you like, and a teacher that will help you to learn it.
You're probably not setting out to be a soloist with the Berlin Philharmonic, so you should get something to play that will keep you interested enough to stick with it.

* When you start getting some technique under your fingers, find opportunities to play with other people, either at, or slightly above your level.
You can learn a lot of stuff just jamming, and it's fun.

* Stick with it. Practice really is the key, and it tends to progress in a series of climbs and plateaus.
But it will always reward you with either better, or more reliable technique.

Oh, and get a metronome. And use it. Smile

--
Dr H

"So, I became an anarchist, and all I got was this lousy T-shirt."
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23-05-2017, 05:46 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
Pick up a scalpel. Doctors make much more money than musicians.

Atheism is NOT a Religion. It's A Personal Relationship With Reality!
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23-05-2017, 05:51 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(23-05-2017 05:52 AM)Gwaithmir Wrote:  Imagine my shock when my mother's and sister's reaction was, "So, what?" Neither expressed any interest in my proposed musical evenings, saying, "We don't have time for that sort of thing." Gasp

The point of this story is that you should be sure you will have someone to share your musical interests with before you decide to make a major investment. Consider

Wow. First time I've ever heard a story quite like that; you have my sympathy.

It was almost the opposite with me. dad was a professional musician and music teacher, and mom had been a professional musician, and I was pretty much forced into it from an early age. Of course I rebelled, and I had to leave music and come back to in on my own before I really appreciated it. It has since become one of the centers of my life.

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Dr H

"So, I became an anarchist, and all I got was this lousy T-shirt."
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23-05-2017, 07:02 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
I've been looking at this violin...

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Bellafina/Pr...-Outfit.gc

It's in my price range for beginner violins. Is it any good?
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23-05-2017, 07:22 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(23-05-2017 07:02 PM)Larai19 Wrote:  I've been looking at this violin...

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Bellafina/Pr...-Outfit.gc

It's in my price range for beginner violins. Is it any good?

I first learned the Piano with my brothers, my mom insisted. I later played guitar, and would sing on stage, my youngest brother learned drums, the middle brother the bass though they both kept with the piano too. Quit playing when I was about 18, both my brothers became professional musicians (that is to say perpetually poor lol).

Either of my brothers would prolly tell you any instrument is fine, what matters is that you play it. Often. A lot.

Not that you're interested in any advice from me.

DLJ Wrote:And, yes, the principle of freedom of expression works both ways... if someone starts shit, better shit is the best counter-argument.
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23-05-2017, 09:03 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(23-05-2017 07:22 PM)JesseB Wrote:  I first learned the Piano with my brothers, my mom insisted. I later played guitar, and would sing on stage, my youngest brother learned drums, the middle brother the bass though they both kept with the piano too. Quit playing when I was about 18, both my brothers became professional musicians (that is to say perpetually poor lol).

Either of my brothers would prolly tell you any instrument is fine, what matters is that you play it. Often. A lot.

Not that you're interested in any advice from me.




Tongue

I self taught from a young age. Started on bass, couldn't resist the guitar though. Spent a lot of time playing it, had a (subjectively) respectable metal band active for almost ten years until we all got too damned old and married. We had some really good times, not just as stupid metalhead assholes, but musically. There's something about creating challenging music that you are passionate about with other people that is unlike any other feeling in the world.

Probably the most satisfying thing I've done in my life. I really hope my boys will love it like I do.

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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23-05-2017, 09:08 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(23-05-2017 09:03 PM)evenheathen Wrote:  
(23-05-2017 07:22 PM)JesseB Wrote:  I first learned the Piano with my brothers, my mom insisted. I later played guitar, and would sing on stage, my youngest brother learned drums, the middle brother the bass though they both kept with the piano too. Quit playing when I was about 18, both my brothers became professional musicians (that is to say perpetually poor lol).

Either of my brothers would prolly tell you any instrument is fine, what matters is that you play it. Often. A lot.

Not that you're interested in any advice from me.




Tongue

I self taught from a young age. Started on bass, couldn't resist the guitar though. Spent a lot of time playing it, had a (subjectively) respectable metal band active for almost ten years until we all got too damned old and married. We had some really good times, not just as stupid metalhead assholes, but musically. There's something about creating challenging music that you are passionate about with other people that is unlike any other feeling in the world.

Probably the most satisfying thing I've done in my life. I really hope my boys will love it like I do.

Personally I miss it. I did love it, I only quit because of bullying. I became very reclusive for a long time and focused on my second love. Computers.

I would encourage anyone to do music. Even people I don't like and are scumbags.

DLJ Wrote:And, yes, the principle of freedom of expression works both ways... if someone starts shit, better shit is the best counter-argument.
Big Grin
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23-05-2017, 11:12 PM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
I started playing guitar since I was 13. I also learned keyboard later on. But there is no particular age to start learning any musical instrument. you can learn at any age
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24-05-2017, 12:26 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(23-05-2017 11:12 PM)TheUnholy Wrote:  I started playing guitar since I was 13. I also learned keyboard later on. But there is no particular age to start learning any musical instrument. you can learn at any age

Do you compose any music? Smile
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