Taking Up an Instrument
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24-05-2017, 12:29 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
@Larai19

When you play most likely you'll end up composing, at least to some extent. I found when I used to play it just happens, both my brothers too.

I'd like to be clear about something though. I'm pretty sure I hate you. I still think you should learn music. Music is life.

DLJ Wrote:And, yes, the principle of freedom of expression works both ways... if someone starts shit, better shit is the best counter-argument.
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24-05-2017, 12:35 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(23-05-2017 05:38 PM)julep Wrote:  
(23-05-2017 11:56 AM)Larai19 Wrote:  I would be learning the violin from scratch. I'm enchanted by the music but I german and chess studies... Do you think I could manage all three? Huh

Yes. You don't have to work equally hard at each one all the time, and when you get frustrated or overwhelmed by one and need time for your back brain to process it, you can shift more attention to the others.

I'm a schedule hound. Though, I'm convinced that it would help me with the others. Big Grin
Do you know about a good ratio with time and learning an instrument?
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24-05-2017, 12:38 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
Ok, just so it's clear.

DLJ Wrote:And, yes, the principle of freedom of expression works both ways... if someone starts shit, better shit is the best counter-argument.
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24-05-2017, 02:19 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(24-05-2017 12:35 AM)Larai19 Wrote:  Do you know about a good ratio with time and learning an instrument?

More time you spend, faster you learn. If you spend too little, you forget what you already learned. I suggest try for twice a week minimum, and set aside around an hour each time. You can always increase it if you find you're enjoying it. I think much less than that and you doom yourself to permanent beginner status. Also do look for a teacher. Good teacher will get you well grounded in the basics. If you start by yourself and learn bad habits (i.e. habits of playing which can result in not the best sound, or habits of holding your instrument which quickly become tiring, or habits which limit what you can do, such as holding the bow in a way that you can't use the full length of it), can't easily break them later.

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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24-05-2017, 02:48 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(24-05-2017 12:35 AM)Larai19 Wrote:  
(23-05-2017 05:38 PM)julep Wrote:  Yes. You don't have to work equally hard at each one all the time, and when you get frustrated or overwhelmed by one and need time for your back brain to process it, you can shift more attention to the others.

I'm a schedule hound. Though, I'm convinced that it would help me with the others. Big Grin
Do you know about a good ratio with time and learning an instrument?

I recommend frequent and relatively short sessions at the beginning, although if you have the time and desire it's fine to go longer.

For example: start by setting an hour, one day a week, as lesson day. Lessons can be with a teacher in person, by Skype, or on Youtube or something similar. The point of the lesson is to give you something to focus on for the week. Then budget 20-minute segments, four other days of the week, to practice the lesson material, plus anything else you want to learn. Especially at the beginning, frequency is more important than the length of the session. Don't say to yourself, "well, I practiced for an hour on Wednesday, so that means I can skip two days' practice." It's the habit and the muscle memory you're trying to build. And the ear as well (your ability to listen to yourself and hear where you should put the notes) is better developed in this way.

That gives you an initial time investment of five days per week, a little less than three hours, total. Plan to give the violin at least this much time for six months to a year and you'll be able to tell by the end of that period whether violin is for you.
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24-05-2017, 07:18 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
Here's a great TED talk about how to learn pretty much anything in 20 hours. Applies to musical instruments as well.



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24-05-2017, 07:26 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(24-05-2017 02:19 AM)morondog Wrote:  
(24-05-2017 12:35 AM)Larai19 Wrote:  Do you know about a good ratio with time and learning an instrument?

More time you spend, faster you learn. If you spend too little, you forget what you already learned. I suggest try for twice a week minimum, and set aside around an hour each time. You can always increase it if you find you're enjoying it. I think much less than that and you doom yourself to permanent beginner status. Also do look for a teacher. Good teacher will get you well grounded in the basics. If you start by yourself and learn bad habits (i.e. habits of playing which can result in not the best sound, or habits of holding your instrument which quickly become tiring, or habits which limit what you can do, such as holding the bow in a way that you can't use the full length of it), can't easily break them later.

I suppose this is a silly question because it depends on a lot of variables but how long does it take to learn an instrument, generally. Assuming it's practiced for at least an hour a day...
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24-05-2017, 07:28 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(24-05-2017 02:48 AM)julep Wrote:  
(24-05-2017 12:35 AM)Larai19 Wrote:  I'm a schedule hound. Though, I'm convinced that it would help me with the others. Big Grin
Do you know about a good ratio with time and learning an instrument?

I recommend frequent and relatively short sessions at the beginning, although if you have the time and desire it's fine to go longer.

For example: start by setting an hour, one day a week, as lesson day. Lessons can be with a teacher in person, by Skype, or on Youtube or something similar. The point of the lesson is to give you something to focus on for the week. Then budget 20-minute segments, four other days of the week, to practice the lesson material, plus anything else you want to learn. Especially at the beginning, frequency is more important than the length of the session. Don't say to yourself, "well, I practiced for an hour on Wednesday, so that means I can skip two days' practice." It's the habit and the muscle memory you're trying to build. And the ear as well (your ability to listen to yourself and hear where you should put the notes) is better developed in this way.

That gives you an initial time investment of five days per week, a little less than three hours, total. Plan to give the violin at least this much time for six months to a year and you'll be able to tell by the end of that period whether violin is for you.

Laugh out load I have a bad habit of doing that when trying to build new habits.

Instruments are an investment aren't they?
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24-05-2017, 07:29 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(24-05-2017 07:18 AM)Heath_Tierney Wrote:  Here's a great TED talk about how to learn pretty much anything in 20 hours. Applies to musical instruments as well.




Thank you! Big Grin I will watch it after I get home from the doctor's later. Thumbsup
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24-05-2017, 08:52 AM
RE: Taking Up an Instrument
(24-05-2017 07:26 AM)Larai19 Wrote:  I suppose this is a silly question because it depends on a lot of variables but how long does it take to learn an instrument, generally. Assuming it's practiced for at least an hour a day...

It depends what you want to do. If you want to play twinkle twinkle little star... then a few hours from when you first touch it. If you want to play Beethoven... maybe a lifetime? Goals intermediate will take intermediate time.

The good news is whichever point you are at, it's always reasonably good fun Smile

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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