Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
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07-02-2013, 05:59 PM
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
(07-02-2013 05:34 PM)Luminon Wrote:  In the long run? We'll need more than that. Creativity, equilibrium, moderacy, brotherhood, sharing and so on.
My emphasis on the word: equilibrium.

You hit the nail right on our heads, Luminon.

We have everything but that.

Actually, the absolute very best book I have ever read on our qualities and methods best suited to discover truth is John Ralston Saul's "On Equilibrium".

He lists six qualities we require, and we require in equilibrium, to find truth:

These six are:

Common sense
Ethics
Imagination
Intuition
Memory
Reason.

To quote him: "Think of each of us at our door, turning the door-handle and using our inner forces to help us know who we are. If we embrace our six qualities and the push and pull of tension which holds them together, they can help us shape our lives, by opening ourselves up to the whole idea of who we are".
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07-02-2013, 06:11 PM (This post was last modified: 07-02-2013 06:16 PM by fstratzero.)
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
(07-02-2013 05:59 PM)Zat Wrote:  
(07-02-2013 05:34 PM)Luminon Wrote:  In the long run? We'll need more than that. Creativity, equilibrium, moderacy, brotherhood, sharing and so on.
My emphasis on the word: equilibrium.

You hit the nail right on our heads, Luminon.

We have everything but that.

Actually, the absolute very best book I have ever read on our qualities and methods best suited to discover truth is John Ralston Saul's "On Equilibrium".

He lists six qualities we require, and we require in equilibrium, to find truth:

These six are:

Common sense
Ethics
Imagination
Intuition
Memory
Reason.

To quote him: "Think of each of us at our door, turning the door-handle and using our inner forces to help us know who we are. If we embrace our six qualities and the push and pull of tension which holds them together, they can help us shape our lives, by opening ourselves up to the whole idea of who we are".
You do realize that common sense, imagination, memory, and intuition are often incorrect.

This video illustrates how through mathematics we overcome a 4 of those.
According to inductive logic based on evidence we can trust the mathematics.



Member of the Cult of Reason

The atheist is a man who destroys the imaginary things which afflict the human race, and so leads men back to nature, to experience and to reason.
-Baron d'Holbach-
Bitcion:1DNeQMswMdvx4xLPP6qNE7RkeTwXGC7Bzp
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07-02-2013, 06:22 PM
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
(07-02-2013 06:11 PM)fstratzero Wrote:  You do realize that common sense, imagination, memory, and intuition are often incorrect.
...
That is why you need them in EQUILIBRIUM!

The old checks and balances system. Smile
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07-02-2013, 06:24 PM
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
(07-02-2013 05:59 PM)Zat Wrote:  
(07-02-2013 05:34 PM)Luminon Wrote:  In the long run? We'll need more than that. Creativity, equilibrium, moderacy, brotherhood, sharing and so on.
My emphasis on the word: equilibrium.

You hit the nail right on our heads, Luminon.

We have everything but that.

Actually, the absolute very best book I have ever read on our qualities and methods best suited to discover truth is John Ralston Saul's "On Equilibrium".

He lists six qualities we require, and we require in equilibrium, to find truth:

These six are:

Common sense
Ethics
Imagination
Intuition
Memory
Reason.

To quote him: "Think of each of us at our door, turning the door-handle and using our inner forces to help us know who we are. If we embrace our six qualities and the push and pull of tension which holds them together, they can help us shape our lives, by opening ourselves up to the whole idea of who we are".
I pretty much have to agree...people need to develop these skills. However, how can we help people learn these skills? The "How" part is whar interests me most.
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07-02-2013, 06:30 PM (This post was last modified: 07-02-2013 06:47 PM by fstratzero.)
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
(07-02-2013 06:22 PM)Zat Wrote:  
(07-02-2013 06:11 PM)fstratzero Wrote:  You do realize that common sense, imagination, memory, and intuition are often incorrect.
...
That is why you need them in EQUILIBRIUM!

The old checks and balances system. Smile
That's why I think reason/Critical Thinking should come first above the rest.

Member of the Cult of Reason

The atheist is a man who destroys the imaginary things which afflict the human race, and so leads men back to nature, to experience and to reason.
-Baron d'Holbach-
Bitcion:1DNeQMswMdvx4xLPP6qNE7RkeTwXGC7Bzp
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07-02-2013, 06:35 PM
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
I am in the process of publishing my book on "Physics -- the Skeleton of Nature".

In this book I don't get bogged down in the details of calculations, proofs, test questions (I am putting these into the Appendix called: "Math lover's paradise"). I am concentrating on the essence of every part of Classical Physics -- the Fundamental concepts and principles. I talk about how a new law was discovered, how one discovery was built on another, how one idea created another.

At University I had a perfect teacher.

He wrote his own textbook and never repeated anything in class that was already in the book. He just told us at the end of each class to read up on the next subject from page x to page y. Next time he came in, he was talking to us about the scientists, the story of the discovery, the philosophical and scientific essence of the new laws and the new areas that it opened up. He had hundreds of anecdotes, funny stories, jokes, examples.

We never missed a class, we were riveted by his presentation -- in his words Physics came to life.

That is one way to inspire young people to think and learn.
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07-02-2013, 06:47 PM (This post was last modified: 07-02-2013 06:51 PM by fstratzero.)
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
Don't get me wrong I think being irrational, emotional, and ridiculous is fun! It's important for us to play, and be illogical, but when somebody is making a truth claim whether it be on TV, the news, or in conversation, we should have the tools to evaluate that.

Especially in the States where Fox News exists...

Member of the Cult of Reason

The atheist is a man who destroys the imaginary things which afflict the human race, and so leads men back to nature, to experience and to reason.
-Baron d'Holbach-
Bitcion:1DNeQMswMdvx4xLPP6qNE7RkeTwXGC7Bzp
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07-02-2013, 06:54 PM
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
(07-02-2013 06:24 PM)Julius Wrote:  I pretty much have to agree...people need to develop these skills. However, how can we help people learn these skills? The "How" part is what interests me most.
It's not difficult in the early grades: children are interested and enthusiastic. You can engage them in lively conversation. If you watch them when they don't know an adult is present (and they don't have to put on The Moppet Show*) little 5- and 6-year-olds behave like socialized grownups much of the time. They debate, negotiate, argue, compromise, arbitrate. Alone, they test, measure, observe, construct, try again another way. They work things out. They don't want things or solutions or facts to be handed to them all pat and polished, with a cherry on top. By about 12, North American children develop an attitude of "Why bother? It's all been done a dozen times over. A factory can make better things; an expert can find better solutions, Wikipedia knows more facts. If I can't be the best and most famous, there's no use trying at all."

By treating them with contempt.... Let me back up a bit. We love and cherish them all to bits - that's why we protect them from the slightest injury, discomfort, risk, failure, boredome or disappointment. We expect so very little of them and give them so much! We indulge them right out of their creativity, curiosity and self-esteem.

I have proposed an alternative educational system before - it's too long to go into here. Mainly, it's about teaching children skills and then letting them do actual, real, useful work in the real world, among real people. (Not in the mines and sweatshops, Mr. Gingrich.)

* Oh, cripes, i caught a toddler beauty contest on tv the other day. Utterly puke-inducing! USian culture definitely needs an overhaul.

It's not the mean god I have trouble with - it's the people who worship a mean god.
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07-02-2013, 07:08 PM (This post was last modified: 07-02-2013 07:16 PM by Zat.)
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
(07-02-2013 06:47 PM)fstratzero Wrote:  Don't get me wrong I think being irrational, emotional, and ridiculous is fun! It's important for us to play, and be illogical...
Absolutely. Without being playful and whimsical, we will never come up with new ideas.

Niels Bohr told Wolfgang Pauli once: "We are all agreed that your theory is crazy. The question that divides us is whether it is crazy enough to have a chance of being
correct.
"
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07-02-2013, 07:09 PM
RE: Teaching "Critical Thinking" in Education
(07-02-2013 06:35 PM)Zat Wrote:  I am in the process of publishing my book on "Physics -- the Skeleton of Nature".

In this book I don't get bogged down in the details of calculations, proofs, test questions (I am putting these into the Appendix called: "Math lover's paradise"). I am concentrating on the essence of every part of Classical Physics -- the Fundamental concepts and principles. I talk about how a new law was discovered, how one discovery was built on another, how one idea created another.

At University I had a perfect teacher.

He wrote his own textbook and never repeated anything in class that was already in the book. He just told us at the end of each class to read up on the next subject from page x to page y. Next time he came in, he was talking to us about the scientists, the story of the discovery, the philosophical and scientific essence of the new laws and the new areas that it opened up. He had hundreds of anecdotes, funny stories, jokes, examples.

We never missed a class, we were riveted by his presentation -- in his words Physics came to life.

That is one way to inspire young people to think and learn.
Zat,

This is a great book and i wish you all the success in the world. For sure, Isaac Asimov's, "The History of Physics" helped me to much better understand Physics way back when I was a student, and I'm sure your book will do an even greater service.

Anyways...you got me thinking about a question I asked as a young student before a class of some pretty cynical students. Basically, the question was this: "Why do second-order differential equations seem to model so many natural phenomena so well?" The Prof looks at me and says, You really don't know?" And I said, "Yeah...I really don't know and neither does anyone here or most of your grad students I bet...let's ask!" At this time, the smartest guy I ever knew, a a young grad student, says something to the effect, "He's right, none of us really knows for sure." So...the Prof tells us in a simple way that, after he said it, we couldn't believe we missed. About 20 Grads and Undergrads had the light bulb go off all at once. It was amazing. [Energy in - Energy Out - Initial Conditions] As simple as it was, we just never really saw it - or at least appreciated it. Amazing.

Thanks.

Julius
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