Teenage Atheists
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31-01-2013, 09:39 AM
RE: Teenage Atheists
Yo new people.

Hope y'all are enjoying the forum.

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
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31-01-2013, 02:58 PM
RE: Teenage Atheists
(17-05-2012 08:58 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  " Thank God you're not my real son."
I was adopted from Russia at a young age, and when I heard this.... Well I wasn't happy.
I never saw this thread before now and, when I just read that, my heart felt like it sunk through the floor and my eyes welled up. My kids are adopted and they mean everything to me. Beyond when I'm specifically thinking about their adoption, the fact that they are not my biological offspring never even occurs to me. It's irrelevant. They are every bit my real kids as any biologically related kids could be.

I sincerely hope what your mother said in that moment was out of emotions and she really didn't mean it. (Not that it would excuse it; it's not an excusable remark for any reason.) If she did mean it, then she was never really your mother even before that comment. Kids are not supposed to be little versions of their parents. They are individuals like any individuals and a parent's job is to teach them and shape them, not to make them. Your mother doesn't have to agree with you about your atheism or be happy about it, but she should love you no less. That kind of remark is a horrible thing for her to say.

I was listening to Seth's "Atheism and Sexuality" podcast last week (I'm a little behind) and I think it was Zinnia Jones who said something along the lines of blood ties don't make you family. You have to earn the status of family and some people who have no blood ties can be more family than some people who do have them. I completely agree with Zinnia.

I'm sorry you had to hear that from your mother and I'm sorry both your parents seem to have had a very poor reaction to your atheism. I agree with you that coming out as an atheist is needed and also brave. It's no different than people in other movements taking a stand and making it better in the long run for those with the same cause. Eventually (hopefully) it will get easier for future atheists because of the ones who take a stand now and accept the suffering that comes with it.

"Religion has caused more misery to all of mankind in every stage of human history than any other single idea." --Madalyn Murray O'Hair
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01-02-2013, 05:49 AM
RE: Teenage Atheists
I'm 32 now. Was raised roman catholic and willingly went to church daily. It took me years to get out of the delusion. I only admitted it after reading the God Delusion a few months ago, though I had been drifting for years. I am in awe that as a teenager you guys had the mental fortitude to make the switch. You have a lot more character than I had at that time for sure. I have no advice to give because quite frankly I would never have had the guts to do what you did and if I had been around you I would have been one of those nasty kids. I probably have a lot to learn from you teenagers.

---------------------------------------------------------------
Knowledge can be given, Understanding must be earned
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20-02-2013, 08:28 PM
RE: Teenage Atheists
I'm 16 years old and a strong atheist. I understand what you've went through, I've been through so much because of my lack of belief in god. When I first told my parents (about a year and a half ago), they cussed me out, made me eat alone (instead of with the family, which was the usual thing), they didn't talk to me for at least 3 weeks unless it was to scold me for being an atheist. They pretty much disowned me as their son. Thankfully, they have come to realize that this is who I am. They are more accepting to it, they treat me like part of the family again. And I know it has gotten better for me, hopefully it will for you too.

I first started questioning my beliefs in middle school. My parents had taken my sister and I out of public school, and we had to go to a private Christian school. We had Bible study classes; we had to read the Bible, write about our findings, and discuss them with the class. My teacher always thought of me as a rebellious kid because I questioned things the most. And what that made me realize is that they're teaching these kids and young adults to blindly follow something without making your own decisions. I realized right then and there that I didn't want to associate with religion. I started reading more and more of the Bible, watching religious documentaries, etc. until I finally came to the conclusion that God does not exist.

But as far as the whole situation with your parents, give them time. Talk to them, tell them how you feel about their attitude towards you and your personal choices, and tell them that you're still their son, whether adopted or not. My sister was actually adopted, and I have always treated her as if she were my biological sister. I would never treat her any differently, no matter what she believed. Hopefully they'll come to their senses and realize that they should love you unconditionally, even if your beliefs and personal choices aren't theirs.

Thanks, hope I helped out. Smile
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23-02-2013, 07:00 PM
RE: Teenage Atheists
(20-02-2013 08:28 PM)jamessandrewss Wrote:  I'm 16 years old and a strong atheist. I understand what you've went through, I've been through so much because of my lack of belief in god. When I first told my parents (about a year and a half ago), they cussed me out, made me eat alone (instead of with the family, which was the usual thing), they didn't talk to me for at least 3 weeks unless it was to scold me for being an atheist. They pretty much disowned me as their son. Thankfully, they have come to realize that this is who I am. They are more accepting to it, they treat me like part of the family again. And I know it has gotten better for me, hopefully it will for you too.

I first started questioning my beliefs in middle school. My parents had taken my sister and I out of public school, and we had to go to a private Christian school. We had Bible study classes; we had to read the Bible, write about our findings, and discuss them with the class. My teacher always thought of me as a rebellious kid because I questioned things the most. And what that made me realize is that they're teaching these kids and young adults to blindly follow something without making your own decisions. I realized right then and there that I didn't want to associate with religion. I started reading more and more of the Bible, watching religious documentaries, etc. until I finally came to the conclusion that God does not exist.

But as far as the whole situation with your parents, give them time. Talk to them, tell them how you feel about their attitude towards you and your personal choices, and tell them that you're still their son, whether adopted or not. My sister was actually adopted, and I have always treated her as if she were my biological sister. I would never treat her any differently, no matter what she believed. Hopefully they'll come to their senses and realize that they should love you unconditionally, even if your beliefs and personal choices aren't theirs.

Thanks, hope I helped out. Smile
Thanks for sharing.

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Credit goes to UndercoverAtheist.
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23-02-2013, 09:21 PM
RE: Teenage Atheists
I'm 18 so I guess I fit in the teenage group.

I had a hard time believing in God for a while but I stubbornly clung on for a while. I developed a mental illness and it got harder to convince myself that there was a god, so I started digging a little deeper. I went through more advanced classes and learned more; I watched shows like The Atheist Experience where I saw a lot of popular Christian arguments for God being refuted. I sort of went from there.

My Young Life friends from high school NEVER talk to me anymore; I think they were just talking to me because I was a number to be won. Luckily, I attracted a lot of non-religious friends so my social life didn't take much of a hit beyond that. One of my friends is actually going to school for his PhD in topology, teaches calculus at the local university and went to Catholic school!



OP: I hope that in time your family will come to realize that they made a mistake and will accept your lifestyle choice. Until then, don't give up on the truth.
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