The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
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04-06-2012, 01:38 PM
The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
I have seen a few threads pop-up in recent weeks about specific science questions and I have started a few threads with descriptions of particular scientific principles (which go largely by the wayside). Because of this, I thought that a thread dedicated to asking questions would be beneficial and would reduce the need to start a new thread every time someone wants to know what evolution is or radiometric dating or quantum theory, etc. This way these questions can be addressed without filling up the science section with short threads and new threads in science can be dedicated to other matters.

I am no expert in all of science but I can probably do a good job describing:
-General Geology (like sedimentology, volcanology, seismology)
-Geochemistry (stable and radiometric isotopes. Including radiometric dating techniques)
-Evolution (from a paleontological perspective mainly. Gradualism vs. Punctuated Equilibrium)

And other ideas and concepts related to these. There are several other individuals on the site who would be capable of describing math and statistics in good detail (I can do statistics fairly well) and at least a few people who are more adept at biology than myself (I tend to only like living things long after they are dead and turned to stone.)

So, anyone out there got any questions?

Evolve
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04-06-2012, 02:17 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
Here's an easy one just to start things off...
If Doc Hubble with his red shirt on the night shift is right that the universe is accelarating apart, why the fuck are they telling us that the Andromeda galaxy is on a collision course with earth?

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04-06-2012, 02:20 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
Why is the sky blue? Smile

"All that is necessary for the triumph of Calvinism is that good Atheists do nothing." ~Eric Oh My
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04-06-2012, 02:42 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 02:17 PM)DLJ Wrote:  Here's an easy one just to start things off...
If Doc Hubble with his red shirt on the night shift is right that the universe is accelarating apart, why the fuck are they telling us that the Andromeda galaxy is on a collision course with earth?
Don't confuse local motion with average motion across the visible universe.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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04-06-2012, 02:43 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 02:20 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  Why is the sky blue? Smile
It's gray, here. Sadcryface2

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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04-06-2012, 02:48 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 02:42 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(04-06-2012 02:17 PM)DLJ Wrote:  Here's an easy one just to start things off...
If Doc Hubble with his red shirt on the night shift is right that the universe is accelarating apart, why the fuck are they telling us that the Andromeda galaxy is on a collision course with earth?
Don't confuse local motion with average motion across the visible universe.

Don't confuse irony with...
um...
something that isn't irony.

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04-06-2012, 05:11 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 02:20 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  Why is the sky blue? Smile

Same reason the ocean is, water!!

I can't wait til my son gets old enough so that I can start talking science with him.

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04-06-2012, 06:21 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
[Image: img.cgi?i=131617]

srs question... What's the most probably hypothesis around for abiogenesis at the moment?

Sapere aude! Have courage to use your own understanding!
Take the risk of thinking for yourself, much more happiness, truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way.


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04-06-2012, 06:39 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
There are a lot of models of abiogenesis. In general, to create life, you need the building blocks of life first. Some people theorise that the atmosphere of the Earth was of a reducing nature. Shown in the Miller-Urey experiment, electrical activity is able to catalyse the formation of basic amino acids in a reducing atmosphere. Biological polymers are formed through via early proteins produced by early genetic templates using RNA or some other form of nucleotide. Research is being carried out to understand how early biological polymers and even how early cells form. There is also evidence that nucleotides may have an extraterrestrial origin.

Welcome to science. You're gonna like it here - Phil Plait

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04-06-2012, 06:59 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
The miller-Urey hypothesis, although a good one, has not held up very well unfortunately. It hasn't been repeated successfully and unfortunately a couple of their key assumptions were also unlikely. First is the nitrogen source, they used ammonia and unfortunately, geochemical evidence suggests that early N in the oceans was not available as ammonia. Secondly was the administration of the electricity. They wanted to simulate lightening but constant electrical stimulation to the apparatus does not replicate random lightening strikes. The primordial soup hypothesis still stands though, it is just notoriously hard to test.

My favorite abiogenesis hypothesis is centered around vent communities. At deep sea hydrothermal vents, there is plenty of energy and abundant resources for chemosynthesizers, which are the likely ancestor to all of life on our little planet.

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