The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
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04-06-2012, 07:01 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 05:11 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  I can't wait til my son gets old enough so that I can start talking science with him.
omg omg omg. If you have a child you must expose them to They Might be Giants "Here Comes Science" album. Also, don't forget to play science games with your children Smile


http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDEE83D1704954641

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_Comes_Science

http://www.merchdirect.com/TheyMightBeGi...ctid=12445


My daughter is six. We have a molecular modelling kit that the local university chemistry department threw out, so she has an understanding of simple organic chemistry. From watching the elements song on the album above she was able to answer by the time she was four what elements mostly constitute life (carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen) - that's without me teaching it to her. She picked it up from the song itself. She knows about the spectrum of light. She has a good understanding of the solar system and our place in the galaxy and the universe. We're starting to work through the Dr Karl book "Dinosaurs aren't dead" which contains a brief history of the universe and life on earth. She has a very very very introductory understanding of special relativity. Next step - quantum physics! I just have to keep reading to stay ahead of her.

One thing that MENSA tells you is to try and teach your children things they won't be studying at school, at least for a while. That will give them the best opportunity to learn while at school while also keeping themselves occupied and interested. With my daughter it helps that her uncle is a research neurologist and brings home cool things like liquid nitrogen to play with every once in a while.

This is totally the wrong thread for this. Sorry. Exuberance!

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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04-06-2012, 07:13 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 06:21 PM)ALovelyChickenMan Wrote:  [Image: img.cgi?i=131617]

You don't. You zero the data. You replace a differentiated creation with an undifferentiated creation. Christians. Tongue

(04-06-2012 06:21 PM)ALovelyChickenMan Wrote:  srs question... What's the most probably hypothesis around for abiogenesis at the moment?

Geometry. If I can find a link laterz I'll post it, but basically, shit like carbon, hydrogen, oxygen; they can be pictured as spheres of a certain size. And as shit in reality is always moving around, things of a certain size just fall together. Vector, gravity, electricity, time -> life. Life balances entropy. Buncha theists ain't gonna dig that we're just a static accumulation of sifted shit, but fuck them. Big Grin

I like it just fine. I'll go with NdT on this one. Being made of the most common scrap in the universe increases the commonality of being in the universe. One with the universe without all the woo. Don't need to be a wise man atop the hill, just needs to be a hill (like my Gwynnies, oc).

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04-06-2012, 08:23 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 05:11 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  
(04-06-2012 02:20 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  Why is the sky blue? Smile

Same reason the ocean is, water!!

I can't wait til my son gets old enough so that I can start talking science with him.
I thought the ocean was blue because it reflected the sky. I guess I had it backwards. The sky reflects the ocean.

"All that is necessary for the triumph of Calvinism is that good Atheists do nothing." ~Eric Oh My
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04-06-2012, 08:52 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 07:13 PM)houseofcantor Wrote:  
(04-06-2012 06:21 PM)ALovelyChickenMan Wrote:  [Image: img.cgi?i=131617]

You don't. You zero the data. You replace a differentiated creation with an undifferentiated creation. Christians. Tongue

(04-06-2012 06:21 PM)ALovelyChickenMan Wrote:  srs question... What's the most probably hypothesis around for abiogenesis at the moment?

Geometry. If I can find a link laterz I'll post it, but basically, shit like carbon, hydrogen, oxygen; they can be pictured as spheres of a certain size. And as shit in reality is always moving around, things of a certain size just fall together. Vector, gravity, electricity, time -> life. Life balances entropy. Buncha theists ain't gonna dig that we're just a static accumulation of sifted shit, but fuck them. Big Grin

I like it just fine. I'll go with NdT on this one. Being made of the most common scrap in the universe increases the commonality of being in the universe. One with the universe without all the woo. Don't need to be a wise man atop the hill, just needs to be a hill (like my Gwynnies, oc).

Yes! Yes! Yes!

Praise be!

That's is now a grand total of 2 (yes two) HoC posts that I have understood.

Meanwhile...
Abiogenesis.... La lala lala.... GOD DID IT! Now STFU I'm going back to bed.

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04-06-2012, 09:47 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 02:20 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  Why is the sky blue? Smile

The sky is blue because the light from the sun is filtered through the gasses of the atmosphere and shifts to the blue end of the light spectrum.
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04-06-2012, 11:08 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 02:20 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  Why is the sky blue? Smile
It's so sad... then it cries rain Sad
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04-06-2012, 11:10 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
(04-06-2012 11:08 PM)LadyJane Wrote:  
(04-06-2012 02:20 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  Why is the sky blue? Smile
It's so sad... then it cries rain Sad
Pour sky. It must be feeling under the weather even more here in the NW. Weeping

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11-06-2012, 06:08 AM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
Here's one:
Planets form with the heaviest molecules sinking towards the centre and lighter elements near the surface. Tectonic activity sometimes brings heavier elements such as iron to the surface of our planet.

So... does this also happen for solar systems? Would the heaviest dust end up closest to the centre of mass, and therefore closest to the source of ignition for the star? Should stars therefore contain the heaviest elements within the solar system with planets and especially outer planets containing the lightest?

Why is it that we have rocky planets near our sun? Does the sun's composition resemble the composition of the inner, rocky planets?

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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11-06-2012, 09:13 AM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
The theory seems to be, not so much. Once upon a time there was this big spinny pile of gas called the solar nebula which had lots of angular momentum and ridiculous magnetic fields. These fields pushed ionized violatiles outwards so that there's gas giants out there and rocky worlds in here. After a bit the spinny magnetic stuff settled down and clumps formed. Where they formed is prolly a result of harmonics, like how the asteroid belt may have been a clump trying to form in harmonic discord and blammo! Seems also that the mass exodus of ionized volitiles carried with it heavier elements in parts per billions much like a river will make off with a tree when it gets excited. Here's some linky:

http://www.space.com/58-the-sun-formatio...stics.html


http://ircamera.as.arizona.edu/NatSci102...ysform.htm


http://lasp.colorado.edu/~bagenal/1010/S...ation.html


http://www.astronomy.org/astronomy-survi...lform.html


http://www.universetoday.com/40631/parts-of-the-sun/

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11-06-2012, 02:47 PM
RE: The Big Thread of Science questions and Answers
It's also important to note that the composition of the sun is basically the composition of the solar system because it has so much mass when compared with everything else. The sun is a 2nd generation star, meaning it was seeded by the remnants of other dead stars. So, its composition is almost entirely Hydrogen and Helium (>98%) with the remaining <1% being every other element present in our solar system.
(11-06-2012 06:08 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  Here's one:
Planets form with the heaviest molecules sinking towards the centre and lighter elements near the surface. Tectonic activity sometimes brings heavier elements such as iron to the surface of our planet.

So... does this also happen for solar systems? Would the heaviest dust end up closest to the centre of mass, and therefore closest to the source of ignition for the star? Should stars therefore contain the heaviest elements within the solar system with planets and especially outer planets containing the lightest?

Why is it that we have rocky planets near our sun? Does the sun's composition resemble the composition of the inner, rocky planets?

Evolve
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