The Birth of Our Planets
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19-12-2014, 11:09 AM
The Birth of Our Planets
I'm looking for answers, and those answers can include your speculations on how our planets came into existence. As many of you know, I am very open minded and don't mind even some of the most unlikely explanations.

How do you think our planets got here? What do you really think?

Go!

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19-12-2014, 11:15 AM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
Um this is no mystery. Gravity. It is that simple. Space dust and meteors and bodies colliding after the birth of a star generates gravity. That gravity causes those bodies to build up and become denser eventually to the point of becoming planets.

Poetry by Brian37(poems by an atheist) Also on Facebook as BrianJames Rational Poet and Twitter Brianrrs37
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19-12-2014, 11:23 AM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
Question one... Our planets? Huh

You such as the thought on how in the wake of nebulae or after it once stars have been formed, the heavy elements lingering coalesce into hot round structures that get begin to orbit stars while potentially colliding with other planets before either ejecting from orbit, breaking into bits, or stabilizing as a cooled planet or planet-like kinda body not exactly orbiting a star itself.

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19-12-2014, 11:39 AM (This post was last modified: 19-12-2014 11:50 AM by Free.)
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
I tend to agree with both of you.

I see Saturn as being the kind of "epicenter" of a collision between a couple of large rocks. From that collision, perhaps some or all of our other planets were formed. Such a collision may have slowed down the speed of these rocks and enabled them both- as well as larger rock fragments that eventually formed other planets- to get trapped by the sun's gravitational effect.

Over time, with the solar wind and other factors, the current shape of our planets was formed.

With Saturn being the epicenter it may explain those rings. All those smaller rocks being at the epicenter got trapped by Saturn's gravitational effect.

Undecided

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19-12-2014, 11:57 AM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 11:15 AM)Brian37 Wrote:  Gravity. It is that simple.
One would think that electromagnitism and Strong and Weak nuclear forces were also important.

Also don't forget that the big bang was insufficient to create many of the elements such as Iron and Carbon. So we needed a Star to go super nova prior to our own solar system.

Then probably our Sun began to form, and while it formed it rotated and caused many other objects, gas and rock to rotate around it, they collided into clumps which became planets and moons etc.
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19-12-2014, 12:06 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
Here's a decent primer of the current scientific consensus.

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Flesh and blood of a dead star, slain in the apocalypse of supernova, resurrected by four billion years of continuous autocatalytic reaction and crowned with the emergent property of sentience in the dream that the universe might one day understand itself.
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19-12-2014, 12:15 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
Nuclear strong and weak forces only have a significant effect over ridiculously short distances. They'll be important in the core of the protostar but unless you're approaching pressures and densities where fusion becomes a possibility they don't play much of a role.

Electromagnetism might play some small role early on but not much. Until the sun lights up it's largely gravity. Once that happens you have an abundant source of EM, which pushes the "snow line" back to the orbit of Jupiter and differentiates the rocky planets from the gas giants.

Both carbon and iron can form without supernovae. Our sun will likely end up in a helium-burning C-N-O cycle at the end of its days and likely produces some small part of its energy that way now.

You're right though, it does take a supernova to get anything further up the periodic table than iron and nickel. Thorium and Uranium can only be produced by r-processes that are found in supernovae. Many other elements can be produced by s-processes in normal stars but require precursors that have to be formed in supernovae.

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19-12-2014, 12:21 PM (This post was last modified: 19-12-2014 12:37 PM by Stevil.)
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 12:15 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  Nuclear strong and weak forces only have a significant effect over ridiculously short distances. They'll be important in the core of the protostar but unless you're approaching pressures and densities where fusion becomes a possibility they don't play much of a role.
Without strong and weak we don't have atoms, without atoms we don't have stars, without strong and weak nuclear forces we don't have shining stars. Without shining stars we don't have the mechanism to turn hydrogen and helium into other elements.


(19-12-2014 12:15 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  You're right though, it does take a supernova to get anything further up the periodic table than iron and nickel.
It also takes a super nova to get the matter from a star into other parts of space where it can form planets and stuff, doesn't it?
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19-12-2014, 01:27 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 12:21 PM)Stevil Wrote:  
(19-12-2014 12:15 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  Nuclear strong and weak forces only have a significant effect over ridiculously short distances. They'll be important in the core of the protostar but unless you're approaching pressures and densities where fusion becomes a possibility they don't play much of a role.
Without strong and weak we don't have atoms, without atoms we don't have stars, without strong and weak nuclear forces we don't have shining stars. Without shining stars we don't have the mechanism to turn hydrogen and helium into other elements.

Agreed. My point was that nuclear strong and weak forces won't have much to do with the evolution of a nebula into a solar system. Aside from allowing the various constituent elements to exist.

(19-12-2014 12:21 PM)Stevil Wrote:  
(19-12-2014 12:15 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  You're right though, it does take a supernova to get anything further up the periodic table than iron and nickel.
It also takes a super nova to get the matter from a star into other parts of space where it can form planets and stuff, doesn't it?

Not necessarily, though it certainly helps. Large, unstable stars that are too small to produce a supernova but large enough to become a giant star typically blast their outer layers off into interstellar space. Our sun is expected to do that in 4 or 5 billion years. The resulting nebula is poorer in metals though. A few of the exoplanets that have been found are poor in metals and may have formed that way.

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19-12-2014, 06:46 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 01:27 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  Not necessarily, though it certainly helps. Large, unstable stars that are too small to produce a supernova but large enough to become a giant star typically blast their outer layers off into interstellar space. Our sun is expected to do that in 4 or 5 billion years. The resulting nebula is poorer in metals though. A few of the exoplanets that have been found are poor in metals and may have formed that way.
But for our solar system, we probably came from a super nova?
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