The Birth of Our Planets
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19-12-2014, 07:08 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
Big dust cloud of material from super nova'ed stars and shit. Gravity slowly brings this material together to get small blobs of space dust. These blobs gravitate towards each other and form larger space dust blobs. Gravity pulling on these blobs and objects colliding into them cause them to spin. These blobs slowly pull in more and more space dust and get larger and larger (still spinning because objects in motion don't stop unless acted on). 99.96% (or something like that) of space dust forms the sun which at some point got so big and heavy it could start a fusion reaction.
Other smaller objects, planets, formed but started to orbit the sun rather than get pulled into it.
The planets formed in the same manner as the sun, with small objects getting pulled towards larger ones until a large object is formed (a planet).

Alternatively, God did it.

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19-12-2014, 07:41 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 06:46 PM)Stevil Wrote:  
(19-12-2014 01:27 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  Not necessarily, though it certainly helps. Large, unstable stars that are too small to produce a supernova but large enough to become a giant star typically blast their outer layers off into interstellar space. Our sun is expected to do that in 4 or 5 billion years. The resulting nebula is poorer in metals though. A few of the exoplanets that have been found are poor in metals and may have formed that way.
But for our solar system, we probably came from a super nova?

Do you mean as opposed to a nebulae?

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19-12-2014, 10:28 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 07:41 PM)Free Wrote:  
(19-12-2014 06:46 PM)Stevil Wrote:  But for our solar system, we probably came from a super nova?

Do you mean as opposed to a nebulae?
Wouldn't the nebulae be a remenant of a super nova?
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19-12-2014, 10:32 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 10:28 PM)Stevil Wrote:  
(19-12-2014 07:41 PM)Free Wrote:  Do you mean as opposed to a nebulae?
Wouldn't the nebulae be a remenant of a super nova?

I think it's more complex than that.

I read this.

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20-12-2014, 12:30 AM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 10:32 PM)Free Wrote:  
(19-12-2014 10:28 PM)Stevil Wrote:  Wouldn't the nebulae be a remenant of a super nova?

I think it's more complex than that.

I read this.
From that page
Quote:Some nebulae are formed as the result of supernova explosions, the death throes of massive, short-lived stars.

Because our solar system (including Earth) has lots of heavy elements then we must have come from a super nova. If our matter also came from a Nebula then I surmise that our nebula is a remnant of a super nova.

This is not to say that all nebulas come from super novas, but you would struggle to get rocky planets coming from a nebula of hydrogen and helium and a few our traces of light elements.
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20-12-2014, 09:15 AM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(19-12-2014 11:39 AM)Free Wrote:  I tend to agree with both of you.

I see Saturn as being the kind of "epicenter" of a collision between a couple of large rocks. From that collision, perhaps some or all of our other planets were formed. Such a collision may have slowed down the speed of these rocks and enabled them both- as well as larger rock fragments that eventually formed other planets- to get trapped by the sun's gravitational effect.

Over time, with the solar wind and other factors, the current shape of our planets was formed.

With Saturn being the epicenter it may explain those rings. All those smaller rocks being at the epicenter got trapped by Saturn's gravitational effect.

Undecided

That is a unique view, unsupported by evidence.

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20-12-2014, 01:17 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 09:15 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(19-12-2014 11:39 AM)Free Wrote:  I tend to agree with both of you.

I see Saturn as being the kind of "epicenter" of a collision between a couple of large rocks. From that collision, perhaps some or all of our other planets were formed. Such a collision may have slowed down the speed of these rocks and enabled them both- as well as larger rock fragments that eventually formed other planets- to get trapped by the sun's gravitational effect.

Over time, with the solar wind and other factors, the current shape of our planets was formed.

With Saturn being the epicenter it may explain those rings. All those smaller rocks being at the epicenter got trapped by Saturn's gravitational effect.

Undecided

That is a unique view, unsupported by evidence.

Meh, it's just a hypothesis.

I kinda based it upon the larger planets being in closer proximity to each other. If a collision occurred, the bulk of the two colliding rocks would be where Saturn and Jupiter are. Other rock fragments from the collision could have formed the other planets.

I'm thinking that what is currently Saturn was the far larger rock originally, and it's collision with what is now Jupiter caused the larger fragments of what we call Uranus and Neptune, placing them behind the orbit of Saturn, as a collision could suggest such a scenario.

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20-12-2014, 02:20 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 01:17 PM)Free Wrote:  I kinda based it upon the larger planets being in closer proximity to each other. If a collision occurred, the bulk of the two colliding rocks would be where Saturn and Jupiter are. Other rock fragments from the collision could have formed the other planets.

I'm thinking that what is currently Saturn was the far larger rock originally, and it's collision with what is now Jupiter caused the larger fragments of what we call Uranus and Neptune, placing them behind the orbit of Saturn, as a collision could suggest such a scenario.
But.....

Saturn and Jupiter are gas planets, so why are you talking about rock?
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20-12-2014, 02:31 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 02:20 PM)Stevil Wrote:  
(20-12-2014 01:17 PM)Free Wrote:  I kinda based it upon the larger planets being in closer proximity to each other. If a collision occurred, the bulk of the two colliding rocks would be where Saturn and Jupiter are. Other rock fragments from the collision could have formed the other planets.

I'm thinking that what is currently Saturn was the far larger rock originally, and it's collision with what is now Jupiter caused the larger fragments of what we call Uranus and Neptune, placing them behind the orbit of Saturn, as a collision could suggest such a scenario.
But.....

Saturn and Jupiter are gas planets, so why are you talking about rock?

Because they don't really know yet whether or not they are entirely gaseous. They suspect there is a core of other elements, but they don't really know yet.

My feeling is there is something solid beneath that gas.

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20-12-2014, 02:33 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 01:17 PM)Free Wrote:  
(20-12-2014 09:15 AM)Chas Wrote:  That is a unique view, unsupported by evidence.

Meh, it's just a hypothesis.

I kinda based it upon the larger planets being in closer proximity to each other. If a collision occurred, the bulk of the two colliding rocks would be where Saturn and Jupiter are. Other rock fragments from the collision could have formed the other planets.

I'm thinking that what is currently Saturn was the far larger rock originally, and it's collision with what is now Jupiter caused the larger fragments of what we call Uranus and Neptune, placing them behind the orbit of Saturn, as a collision could suggest such a scenario.

Except those planets are not in close proximity to one another. And they are gas giants - that is mostly gas with a very small rocky core.

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